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V.21 No.15 | 4/12/2012


The Daily Word in awesome Canada, Opposite Day and the sinking ghost ship

The Daily Word

Thousands pilgrimage to Chimayó today.

Las Vegas, N.M., fights fracking and bans oil and gas drilling.

Why Canada should be cheered for ditching the penny.

Menacing Easter bunnies.

Kid sells his kidney for an iPhone.

Marine Corps pilot says he played tag with a UFO in the ’70s.

Guy gets naked for Opposite Day.

Jesus appears in duct tape in Albuquerque.

Coast Guard sinks a ghost ship with a cannon.

Ex-Gov. Gary Johnson says making Gov. Susana Martinez the veep pick would be Sarah Palin, Part Deux.

Smallest town in the States sells for only $900,000.

Why Catholics really eat fish on Fridays.

Pit bull takes a bullet for his owner.

Chevy Chase is an asshole.

V.21 No.13 | 3/29/2012

News Bite

Fuel terminal near a Superfund site seeks a permit to emit more pollutants.
V.21 No.12 | 3/22/2012
Julia Minamata


Recycled Fears

Company makes overtures to a leery neighborhood

After a series of polluting industrial neighbors, one North Valley community is concerned about a coming recycling plant.
Margaret Wright


Can’t see the forest—or the trees

I'm still poring over the findings of a U.S. Forest Service study released last month that gave Albuquerque a high ranking in two key areas—and neither has stellar tidings for our local climate and quality of life.

Researchers documented a high loss of our urban forest area and an increase of impervious ground cover. This means that trees disappeared across the city at the same time that rooftops and pavement spread. The study found us up there in terms of tree loss with New Orleans and fast-growing, drought-stricken Houston.

More impervious surfaces mean more challenges for our thirsty city. Water that falls on an open field has a drastically different outcome compared to water falling on blacktop. The more paved-over, compacted area there is, the less water is absorbed into the ground. It’s also more likely that the water that does soak in (or run off to the river) is polluted and prone to flooding.

You can check out the full text of the Forest Service study here.

V.21 No.11 | 3/15/2012
Peter McBride


Tonight! Outdoor cinema at the Banff Mountain Film Festival

The world-touring film fest makes a pit stop at the KiMo Theatre at 7 p.m. Its fluid and beautifully shot collection of short films features mountain culture, outdoor sports and environmental subjects—including Chasing Water, previewed in this week’s feature. Bonus: $10 to $12 tickets benefit the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and the Mountain Fund.

Peter McBride


A River Ran Through It

The tale of the once-mighty Colorado waterway, part of Tuesday’s Banff Mountain Film Festival tour stop

In a sense, photographer Pete McBride has been preparing to make Chasing Water all his life. Raised on a cattle ranch in central Colorado, he grew up working hay fields irrigated by snowmelt that carved the Grand Canyon and slaked the thirst of the Southwest. “I often used to think about water,” says McBride in the film. “I wondered how much went into our fields and how much returned to the creek ... I wondered how long it would take irrigation water to reach the sea.” Later, as a photographer for National Geographic, Outside and Men’s Journal, McBride traveled to some of the world’s most exotic locales—often, as it happened, shooting stories that related in some way to water.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.8 |


The Daily Word in D3 demolition, thrash metal and glass burrito

The Daily Word

City Council approves a plan to carve up District 3 (Downtown, Barelas, UNM area) and ax Benton's seat.

APD officer ends up in the hospital after chewing on a glass burrito.

St. Michael's in Santa Fe to conduct random student drug tests.

Outrage over Quran burning spreads in Afghanistan. At least 10 Afghans and two American soldiers have died.

Midair helicopter smash kills seven marines during training.

9-year-old girl dies after running for three hours as punishment for stealing a candy bar, according to an Alabama sheriff's office.

UN may prosecute Syrian officials of crimes against humanity.

FDA questions inhalable caffeine.

Maybe you don't need eight hours of sleep.

Serious hipster cruise. Like on a ship.

Startups looking to skim carbon dioxide from the atmo. Bill Gates thinks it's a good idea, says his money.

Virginia politicians second-guess mandatory pre-abortion vaginal probing.

Analysts predict soaring national debt under all GOP contenders' tax plans—except for Ron Paul's.

Thrash metal endorsements for 2012: Megadeth dude supports Santorum.

V.21 No.8 | 2/23/2012


From Toilet to Tap

Rio Rancho plans to pour effluent into the aquifer

Rio Rancho’s waste is being wasted. The same is true for most cities, which treat their sewage well enough to be used for gray water purposes but then send it downriver. Due to the plight of the desert and a rapidly growing population, Rio Rancho no longer wants to send off its sewage.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.7 | 2/16/2012

Neverending Stories

State Axes Cap-and-Trade

After more than a year of death-defying escapes, an environmental rule was repealed on Monday, Feb. 6, with a unanimous vote by a Gov. Susana Martinez-appointed board.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.4 | 1/26/2012


City to pipe landfill methane to the jail

One of the tidbits in this week’s Council Watch got a lot of attention. Albuquerque is going to build a line from a local dump to our Westside lockup. The excess methane that’s usually burned off at the landfill with be used to heat water in the jail’s boiler room.

It’s predicted the project will save the Bernalillo County Metropolitan Detention Center thousands every year for about a century.

V.21 No.3 | 1/19/2012


Germinate local genius with ABQ Sprout

Have you heard about this grassroots effort to improve the city?

The model works like this:

• Folks pay to get into a dinner cooked by a local chef.

• During the dinner, people make pitches on how to make Albuquerque a better place.

• The diners vote, and the money they paid to attend the event becomes an instant micro-grant for the winner.

In Albuquerque it’s called ABQ Sprout, though it’s based on a model that goes by various names in other cities. The first-ever dinner is Saturday, Jan. 28, at the South Valley Multipurpose Center (2008 Larrazolo SW). Admission is $15 to $30 on a sliding scale.

V.21 No.4 | 1/26/2012

Council Watch

A No-Bike Road

Bicyclists spoke out about the first-ever bike ban on a 3,000-foot stretch of Chappell between Osuna and Singer. Signs stating "no bicycles" went up in early January. The city says that stretch is too dangerous for cycling.
V.21 No.3 |


The Daily Word in film caps, Gingrich and Megaupload

The Daily Word

17-year-old student stabbed and killed at school.

City pays woman back after police destroyed her weed.

State lawmakers looking to banish the $50 million cap for film rebates imposed last year.

Look inside the Fukushima containment vessel.

Santa Fe's minimum wage will be the highest in the country.

Congress is going to hold off on PIPA and SOPA votes.

Romney may lose to Gingrich in South Carolina.

College students are playing the fainting game. I thought that was for kids.

Hackers retaliate after Megaupload is shut down.

A matrilineal state in India (where women rule).

If that capsized cruise ship dumps its fuel, it will pollute one of the most pristine segments of the Mediterranean.

Why is it hard to believe in evolution?

Advice that doesn't make sense until you're too old to need it.

Pulitzer Prize: Meh.

V.21 No.3 | 1/19/2012

News Bite

A Spit Shine on the City

Two projects promise to better Burque: ABQ Sprout, a micro-grant dinner that funds good ideas and CNM’s free green-collar jobs training.
V.21 No.1 | 1/5/2012
Julia Minamata


Environment vs. jobs

Is it an either/or proposition?

In the Alibi that’s on stands, Contributor Margaret Wright wrote an article on polarized reactions to the repeal of Albuquerque’s building standards.

The debate was repeated throughout New Mexico in 2011 as construction and real estate folks attempted to lower stringent regulations. They argued that tough rules drive business away and result in fewer jobs. Our Republican leadership mostly agreed and helped usher in repeals of various environmental protections.

But as a September New York Times article tells us, there is nothing new about this ideological conflict. It happens regularly around the country. An MIT economist quoted in the report talks about the “Groundhog’s Day quality” of the argument. He’s actually measured job loss as it relates to environmental regs. Turns out, it’s a tricky thing to study.

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