alibi online
Weekly Alibi PodcastFree Will AstrologyAlibi's Personals
 

water


V.22 No.20 |

news

The Daily Word in shady dentistry, bear bile and riding a Ferris wheel for way too long

The Daily Word

New Mexico's at the top of the list! Of worst droughts in the country!

And pumping water out of the ground just isn't working like it used to.

"El Dentista," an unlicensed dentist in Santa Fe who performed his "services" out of a van, left a trail of mouth infections and unnecessarily removed teeth in his wake. The New Mexico Department of Health is offering free counseling, blood testing and referrals to his victims. But remember, it could be worse.

Developers in Oklahoma are resistant to the idea of including tornado shelters in their homes because it costs too much money. Sad trombone.

Clinton Shepherd of Chicago just finished riding a Ferris wheel for two days straight. "I was thrilled and honored to be able to have all the love and support I did," Shepherd said.

And it turns out that increasing demand for bear bile (used in a nonsense "home-remedy") is really bad for bears.

V.22 No.21 | 5/23/2013
[link]

dreams

Rowdy’s Dream Blog #295: Mermaids.

I swim in deep marble tanks with dreadlocked mermaids.

V.21 No.30 |

News

The Daily Word in Chick-fil-A, Chick-fil-A, and Chick-fil-A

The Daily Word

Student Ghetto residents are trying to stop a townhouse under construction at Garfield and Girard.

The 101 year old Peterson Dam in Las Vegas New Mexico is leaking 60 million gallons of water per year.

Albuquerque's Hope Christian School denied enrollment to a boy because his parents are gay.

Last Thursday Rick Santorum weighed in on the Chick-fil-A controversy. Friday, Sarah Palin ate some Chick-fil-A. Saturday, The Vice President of public relations at Chick-fil-A died. The Mayor of D.C. calls Chick-fil-A "Hate Chicken."

"Little girls point and laugh."

Tourette's syndrome can really make your life complicated.

The Plaid wasn't a particularly loud pattern but I tried to kill him anyway.

Heard of "concierge medicine" yet?

The founder of Amazon has pledged 2.5 million dollars to support marriage equality in Washington.

London's Zil Lanes.

Money awarded to record labels that won their case against Pirate Bay will not be shared with the artists whose rights were being defended.

Kim Jong Eun on a roller coaster.

On this day in 1968, Brian Jones was eating goat cheese and honey, smoking a lot of hash, and recording the Master Musicians of Jajouka.

V.21 No.29 | 7/19/2012
Chaly / CC by-S.A. 2.0

Feature

Is “Megadrought” the new normal?

We've all heard the gloomy scenarios of global warming: extreme weather, drought, famine, breakdown of society, destruction of civilization. Here in New Mexico it feels like we’ve made the switch from esoteric to actual, from computer model to daily life. My perch in Placitas feels like a front-row seat to the apocalypse. Smoke is in the air. Neighbors are fighting over water. Some of my outdoor flower pots have melted in the heat. Wild animals are getting thirsty, hungry and bold. It turns out, this might just be the new normal for the American Southwest.

V.21 No.28 | 7/12/2012

video games

Webgame Wednesday on Thursday: Flooded Village

Dig a trench from the river to water the plants and float the boats. Don't drown the people. Sounds simple enough, but the grid-based puzzler Flooded Village throws enough twists and turns at you to keep the old think-box working overtime. Further impediments (like ice) rear their ugly heads, forcing you to make more convoluted excavations in the landscape. What are you waiting for? Get digging!

V.21 No.29 | 7/19/2012
Chaly / CC by-S.A. 2.0

Feature

Bone Dry

Southwest farms bite the dust as “megadrought” becomes the new normal

In a dirt parking lot near Many Farms, Ariz., a Navajo farmer sold me a mutton burrito. He hasn't used his tractor in two years, he told me, and he’s cooking instead of farming because "there isn't any water." He pointed east at the Chuska mountain range, which straddles the New Mexico border. In a normal year, water coming off the mountains reaches his fields, he said.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.16 | 4/19/2012
Pete Domenici Jr.

News Profile

Mining the Law

An interview with Pete Domenici Jr., attorney for industry

For Domenici Jr., it's a question of balance: "You start with the premise that the reality is that human beings will affect their environment when resources are developed," he says. "So as a society we have to figure out ways to protect the environment while allowing population growth and economic growth to occur."
V.21 No.15 | 4/12/2012
Brap Ola

Neverending Stories

Super Sucker Smackdown

The State Engineer rejects a company’s application to pump water from beneath tiny Datil, N.M. But Augustin Plains Ranch LLC vows to fight back.
V.21 No.11 | 3/15/2012
Peter McBride

Feature

Tonight! Outdoor cinema at the Banff Mountain Film Festival

The world-touring film fest makes a pit stop at the KiMo Theatre at 7 p.m. Its fluid and beautifully shot collection of short films features mountain culture, outdoor sports and environmental subjects—including Chasing Water, previewed in this week’s feature. Bonus: $10 to $12 tickets benefit the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance and the Mountain Fund.

Peter McBride

Feature

A River Ran Through It

The tale of the once-mighty Colorado waterway, part of Tuesday’s Banff Mountain Film Festival tour stop

In a sense, photographer Pete McBride has been preparing to make Chasing Water all his life. Raised on a cattle ranch in central Colorado, he grew up working hay fields irrigated by snowmelt that carved the Grand Canyon and slaked the thirst of the Southwest. “I often used to think about water,” says McBride in the film. “I wondered how much went into our fields and how much returned to the creek ... I wondered how long it would take irrigation water to reach the sea.” Later, as a photographer for National Geographic, Outside and Men’s Journal, McBride traveled to some of the world’s most exotic locales—often, as it happened, shooting stories that related in some way to water.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.8 | 2/23/2012

Environment

From Toilet to Tap

Rio Rancho plans to pour effluent into the aquifer

Rio Rancho’s waste is being wasted. The same is true for most cities, which treat their sewage well enough to be used for gray water purposes but then send it downriver. Due to the plight of the desert and a rapidly growing population, Rio Rancho no longer wants to send off its sewage.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.20 No.50 | 12/15/2011
Eric Williams ericwphoto.com

Environment

Down by the Banks

Does our desert city have the right to drink from the Rio Grande?

In 2008, the city stopped relying solely on a rapidly dwindling aquifer. Our water utility flipped a switch, and the Drinking Water Project came online. The good news is the project seems to be working. The bad news is the New Mexico Court of Appeals just ruled the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority doesn’t have the rights for the Rio Grande.
V.20 No.49 | 12/8/2011

news

When your eyeballs are like raisins, then it’s a drought. Maybe.

Remember when it didn’t rain for months, and the sun punched you during the day? And because of fires devouring trees in every direction, the moon glowed orange at night through the smokey haze?

I think the superheavy instrumental act Pelican sums it up nicely in this number. -------->

But, more to the point, the Water Utility Authority is looking to change how it defines levels of drought. The utility bases drought on how much water we suck from the aquifer under our desert outpost. When the city drinks more than projected, officials can initiate a drought advisory, watch, warning or emergency. As the level increases in urgency, so do water-use restrictions.

But the utility is looking to change the game and proposed new rules. If they come to pass, we’ll have to use up way more aquifer water before an advisory goes into effect. And water-use restrictions would not be tied to the level of drought that’s been initiated. Even if an emergency is declared, your neighbor won’t necessarily have to stop washing her Escalade for hours every afternoon. Instead, the board that oversees the utility will select from a menu of remedies and impose them on customers.

All this and more in this week’s news section.

V.20 No.48 | 12/1/2011

Environment

How Dry Is Dry?

Officials aim to change what we call “drought”

The Water Authority aims to change when we officially call it “drought.”
V.20 No.46 | 11/17/2011
Julia Minimata

news

Water in the desert

In this week’s news section, reporter Jack King highlights a lack of transparency when it comes to the Dirt City’s water supply.

The Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority spent millions on a project that’s designed to take some of the strain off our aquifer. We divert water from the Colorado River Basin and add it to the Rio Grande. But the utility hasn’t met its relief objectives for 2009 and 2010, and the governing board had no idea, according to King’s story.

The utility’s promised to up its transparency game.

This week, County Commissioner Art De La Cruz wrote a letter to the Alibi defending the project. He writes:

First and foremost, after three years of project operation the U.S. Geological Survey is reporting that the aquifer is showing signs of rebound. According to the USGS New Mexico Water Science Center, increases in winter groundwater levels (which are most representative of aquifer condition) are being observed. This is consistent with predictions from model simulations wherein groundwater pumping was reduced in favor of using surface water. Given that the water-level trend had generally been downward through the early part of this decade, the reversal is an extremely positive development.

Read the rest of his letter in the next edition of the Alibi, which will be online tomorrow evening. And look for another article by King in the coming weeks.

Today's Events

Sabaku Con at Marriott Pyramid

courtesy of sabakucon.com

An anime and Japanese pop-culture convention featuring competitive gaming, cosplay workshops and panels with celebrities like Cara Nicole, Brittney Karbowski and Maile Flanagan.

InnaState • rock, reggae • Citizens of Tape City Showcase • R&B • DJ Buddhafunk at Launchpad

This Enchanted Landscape Opening Reception at Sorrel Sky Gallery

More Recommended Events ››
Join our mailing list for exclusive info, the week's events and free stuff!
 

  • Select sidebar boxes to add below. You can also click and drag to rearrange the boxes; close using the little X icons on each box. To re-add a box you closed, return to this menu.
  • Because you are not logged in, any changes you make to these boxes will vanish as soon as you click to another page. If you log in, the boxes will stick.
  • alibi.com
  • Latest Posts
  • Web Exclusives
  • Recent Rocksquawk Discussions
  • Recent Classifieds
  • Latest User Posts
  • Most Active Users
  • Most Active Stories
  • Calendar Comments
  • Upcoming Alibi Picks
  • Albuquerque
  • Duke City Fix
  • Albuquerque Beer Scene
  • What's Wrong With This Picture?
  • Reddit Albuquerque
  • ABQ Journal Metro
  • ABQrising
  • ABQ Journal Latest News
  • Del.icio.us Albuquerque
  • NM and the West
  • New Mexico FBIHOP
  • Democracy for New Mexico
  • Only in New Mexico
  • Mario Burgos
  • Democracy for New Mexico
  • High Country News
  • El Grito
  • NM Politics with Joe Monahan
  • Stephen W. Terrell's Web Log
  • The Net Is Vast and Infinite
  • Slashdot
  • Freedom to Tinker
  • Is there a feed that should be on this list? Tell us about it.
    Out of the Woodwork
    Out of the Woodwork6.2.2016