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Daily Word

Daily Word

The Daily Word in Saveur, Low Riders, Abelardo's Coke, Hummingbirds and Salmon Snagging

By August March [ Thu Oct 13 2016 1:17 PM ]
The Daily Word

Over at a lifestyle magazine called Saveur, reporter David Tanis reports on a thing called New Mexico green chile.

Meanwile, at NM Politics, Gabe Vasquez writes about herencia.

And the mighty Lobo Football team faces off against the Air Force Falcons on Saturday ... in Tejas.

This weekend, celebrate the poetic mythos of the lowrider at the NM Museum of History.

A Texas man named Abelardo allegedly brought 10 pounds of Peruvian marching powder into New Mexico. He pleaded guilty to those charges on Wednesday.

The Capitol Bar in Socorro has been in business for 120 years.

DCF Blogger Johnny Mango takes a trailer named "Happy" to Alamogordo.

Folks in Arkansas are debating the pros and cons of medical cannabis. As part of one teevee station's examination of an upcoming ballot initiative on the issue in the Natural State, former NM top cop Darren White was consulted.

Apparently, UNM Associate Professor Christopher Witt is friends with the agents of Huitzilopochtli.

Finally, in this week's much-awaited fishing report, salmon snagging is a thing in our state during the autumn.

Event Horizon

Event Horizon


Friday, Oct 14: Sex for the Shy and Awkward

By Megan Reneau [ Thu Oct 13 2016 10:00 AM ]
Best selling author and world reknowned Intimacy and Emotional Freedom Coach, Cathy Vartuli, teaches what it means to recreate yourself around flirting and sexual connections.
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Courtesy of the author


At the Moonlight Guesthouse

By August March [ Wed Oct 12 2016 11:45 PM ]

Exactly 20 years ago I was living in Nepal. Mostly I lived Kathmandu, in a hilly neighborhood called Baluwater, but by the end of October 1996, I’d be back in Burque for good.

There are embassies in that part of the capital of Nepal and government residences too. A long and broad boulevard lined with palm trees marked the western boundary of mi vecino. The palm trees were filled with dates and big fruit bats that had faces like little brown dogs.

The Chinese Embassy and the Mexican Consulate were just a few doors up the street, and the vast estate housing the Prime Minister and his family took up most of the lower end of the area where I lived.

Across from my apartment there was a beer shop that offered ice-cold liters of San Miguel Beer and packets of Triple 5 cigarettes. A huge marijuana plant took up a quarter of my front yard, which was otherwise filled with marigolds and crab grass. I shared the place with a British friend of mine who worked for the Nepali government.

On October 1, 1996, after little preparation and training, we took a flight on Trident Airlines to Pokhara, a small city on the edge of the Himalayan Mountains. There’s a trail there that follows the Kali Ghandaki River up a steep valley to a mountain outpost named Jomsom. After spending the night at the Shamrock Hotel in Pokhara, we decided to fly to Jomsom in an old Soviet Helicopter that had metal buckets for seats.

From Jomsom there was a trail up into the mountains. At about 9400 feet in elevation, hikers could choose to bear west into the Kingdom of Mustang on the edge of the Tibet or head east, away from the river toward the Thorung La pass at about 17,000 feet.

It was cold and windy in Jomsom (elevation 9000 feet) when we arrived in the late afternoon. Somehow the environs seemed barren yet fertile at the same time. The terraced hillsides on either side of the valley were cultivated with apples, buckwheat, lentils and marijuana.

The valley was surrounded by unimaginably huge mountains; years later I have difficulty comprehending how big and looming they really were. There was an army outpost at the edge of town and down by the river was a bank and the travelers’ lodge where Jimi Hendrix supposedly stayed in the late 1960s.

Yaks as big as cars and donkeys decorated with bells roamed through the cobblestone streets, shaking their heads. They were pulling loads of beer, flour, cheese and bottled water up the trail and toward Lo Manthang or Lhasa. Twenty years ago, there was little motorized transport and no paved roads in the area; merchants and pilgrims had traversed the trail following the Kali Gandaki into Tibet on foot or by hoof for centuries though.

After wandering around the place for about an hour, my friend and I took rooms at an inn called the Moonlight Guesthouse because there was a sign out front saying they served the best burritos and apple pie on the Annapurna Circuit.

My room was spartan with whitewashed walls and a small bed, table and oil lamp in the corner. To this day, I like to keep my room at home like the one I had in Jomsom; plain with no decorations and comforting in its simple attestation to the need for rest.

That night I dined on a burrito of yak cheese and lentils that had been folded into a tortilla made from a sort of buckwheat fry bread. It was decent fare all right, but the cooks at the moonlight lodge didn’t have any chile. When I asked after some sort of piquant salsa, one of them told me there was a can of tomato sauce somewhere in the kitchen; they had given up on spaghetti night a few years back because travelers didn’t fancy the buckwheat noodles on offer.

So the slice of apple pie that followed the highlight of my meal and I could’ve eaten the whole pastry, but I didn’t want to give my American identity away. Afterwards a band of Tibetan immigrants came around and played music while we smoked hashish out of a long pipe made from a water buffalo horn.

We stayed in Jomsom two days because it was so damn inviting there; there was a small museum housing a photographic history of the region as well as ammonite fossils—believed by many Hindus to be divine objects—found along parts of the nearby river bed. An enclave of German agriculture experts living on a hillside south of town could talk for hours about the apples, buckwheat and cannabis they were studying while working to introduce methods that would enhance traditional practices and increase crop yields. Jomsom was a bright, windy place—a point of transition and intersection located at the very edge of the world.

On the third day I checked the maps, flashlights and shoes, calibrated my lensatic compass and carefully loaded my pack and sleeping bag. On the way out an older, tanned Swiss man approached and asked if we needed a porter or guide, wondering if we had the proper permits to continue. I produced two government issued cards. My friend told him we were going to go it alone. He looked over his glasses at me and shook his head. And we walked away from Jomsom headed for the mountains.

Next Time: Kagbeni and Muktinath


The Daily Word in Florida, Road Closures and Lurking

By Megan Reneau [ Wed Oct 12 2016 1:32 PM ]
The Daily Word

God may enrich these states with the legality of a certain herb this coming November.

Omelette du fromage is the only French 90s kids need to know.

Did you notice Trump was kind of lurking behind Clinton during the debate?

The James Boyd trial ended in a hung jury.

The President weighs in on why Star Trek is so important.

Traffic on Central was shut down for awhile today because a man was throwing things at cars from a roof.

Florida's voter registration time has been extended till Oct. 18.


The Daily Word in "locker room talk," Hurricane Matthew, and the Standing Rock camp

By Robin Babb [ Mon Oct 10 2016 10:35 AM ]
The Daily Word

The second presidential debate of the year was last night. It was town hall-style debate, where voters were present to ask the two candidates questions. Today, the internet seems to have decided who won the debate after all: Ken Bone, the man in the red sweater.

Last week, some recordings of Trump making lewd comments about women were released, to nobody's surprise. Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, denounced these comments but said that he won't drop out of the campaign. He called getting tapped for the VP spot the "greatest honor" of his life.

Oh, and by the way -- professional athletes are pissed that Trump keeps defending/side-stepping his lewd statements by calling it "locker room talk." That's not how locker rooms work, my dude.

Fuck Columbus Day. Happy Indigenous People's Day.

The indigenous protectors camped at Sacred Stone in North Dakota protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline are now being watched and patrolled by the Morton County Sheriff's Office. The peaceful protestors have already met the brunt of North Dakota's private and state-funded security forces. If this doesn't look like exactly history repeating itself, I don't know what does.

The death toll in Haiti and the southeast US is climbing due to flooding from Hurricane Matthew. Urgent rescue efforts are underway in North Carolina, after severe flooding forced people to their rooftops.

Event Horizon
/ Creative Commons

Event Horizon

Yellowcard Gets the Red Card

Tuesday, Oct 11: Yellowcard • pop-punk, alternative • Like Torches • Dryjacket • indie

By Renée Chavez [ Mon Oct 10 2016 10:00 AM ]
Your tweenage dreams have been awakened.
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Event Horizon

Event Horizon

Heritage, Past and Present

Monday, Oct 10: Indigenous Peoples’ Day Celebration

By Monica Schmitt [ Sun Oct 9 2016 11:00 AM ]
Students of the Native American Community Academy express what it means to be Indigenous in their eyes through story, song and dance.
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Event Horizon
American Murder Song
Courtesy of the artist

Event Horizon

Murder, American Style

Monday, Oct 10: American Murder Song

By August March [ Sun Oct 9 2016 10:00 AM ]
A nihilistic theatrical performance based on death and suffering.
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The Daily Word in Suicidal Chatbots, Wandering Black Holes and Escaping From the Matrix

By Joshua Lee [ Sat Oct 8 2016 10:00 AM ]
The Daily Word

So ... why are we scared of clowns?

Did Microsoft's Japanese chatbot, Rinna, really become suicidal this week?

A couple of billionaires are funding our escape from what they believe is our simulated reality. You know, when I espouse nutty ideas like simulation theory or a holographic universe, it's okay, because the rest of the world tells me I'm crazy. I don't know if I'm comfortable with them agreeing.

Let's turn the creep factor up some. Astronomers have discovered a wandering black hole creeping around another galaxy.

Event Horizon
Courtesy of the Palisades Facebook Page

Event Horizon

Hit 'em with the High and the Low

Sunday, Oct 9: Palisades

By Megan Reneau [ Sat Oct 8 2016 10:00 AM ]
Get out your glitter hairspray and fishnet gloves, kids.
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