Alibi V.14 No.42 • Oct 20-26, 2005 

Music to Your Ears

Crawl Love—Despite the rain—or perhaps because of it—this weekend's Fall Crawl was the most enjoyable that I've ever attended. Central was alive with Crawlers without being uncomfortably overcrowded, and bands still got to play to packed houses. Likewise, the ratio of local to national acts was right-on for my tastes. I'll admit that there were even a few locals that I had never heard before. (I'm talking to you, Cherry Tempo—and I'll see you in November.) At the end of the night the streets weren't asphyxiated with vomit. No, just horse shit from our peace-keeping mounted Albuquerque police units. Thanks, guys! I'm aware that you've probably got your own opinion on how it all went down, and I encourage you to share your experience with us while it's still fresh on your mind. You can do this a few ways: Write a letter to the editor (e-mail letters@alibi.com), call me personally (346-0660, ext. 260) or rant about it on www.rocksquawk.com. Every bit of information is useful to us as we begin thinking about the next Crawl, six months from now in the Spring. What did you enjoy? What kinks could stand to be ironed out? Tell us all about it. And pray for rain.

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Music Magnified

Widespread Panic

Sarah Bonneau

Tuesday, Oct. 25; Kiva Auditorium (All-ages), 7 p.m.: Widespread Panic is one of the most successful touring bands today, but most people have never heard them on the radio. Without television exposure, radio airplay or promotion in record stores, Widespread Panic has sold out shows for more than 18 years, making them one of the top 50 grossing touring acts in the nation. If you've never seen them, here's your chance.

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Spotlight

Vulgar curiosity: mewithoutYou

Or, I'm cuckoo for mewithoutYou

MewithoutYou is one of my favorite new-ish bands (they released their first album in 2002) because they seem to kindle the energy of heavier indie rock of the '90s, what with the distortion and yelling, but at the same time add delicate, well-devised lyrics and inventive sound-structures. I tried to speak with guitarist Michael Weiss over the phone last week as the band drove through Oregon, but the ill-fated conversation got cut off three times before my tape recorder ran out of batteries. What was left out involved a high school production of Fame, Danzig and me watching the "January 1979" video 100 times over the summer. Here's what we salvaged:

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Show Up!

Ramblin' Jack Elliott

"One of the few authentic voices in folk music."

Born in Brooklyn, Ramblin' Jack Elliot began to cultivate his cowboy image when he ran away from home at 15 and joined the rodeo. He learned to play the guitar and was recording by the early '50s. He traveled and lived with Woodie Guthrie, and through him, met Bob Dylan, later playing in his band. He's also toured with Pete Seeger and worked with other American folk greats like "Utah" Phillips, Emmylou Harris and Tom Waits, to name a few. Still, Ramblin' Jack goes mostly unrecognized for his contribution to American folk music. Most recently, he was left out of Martin Scorcese's chronologically confusing documentary “Bob Dylan: No Direction Home," although he was a key figure in the '60s folk explosion which spawned Dylan. Ramblin' Jack is, however, in Bob Dylan's Chronicles: Vol. 1, on pages 245 to 255 (that's according to Jack's tour manager).

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Flyer on the Wall

Mmmm ... Sacrilicious

The writing on the side says, "The Unholy Ghost of Jesus commands you to come and rock." Obey! The show is with Caustic Lye, Kronow and Lower Than Dirt this Saturday, Oct. 22, at Atomic Cantina. Always free, always 21-and-over, usually evil. (LM)

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Sonic Reducer

The Very Hush Hush Mourir C'est Facile (Sao Bento Music)

As you struggle up through sleep, out of a sad dream you can't remember, you might hear the static-muffled sounds of "Forever," the first track on the debut of The Very Hush Hush. The melodious delirium continues, but the pace increases as drum(s)/machines kick in and distorted vocals urgently begin telling you something just beyond your grasp. Created by two classically trained pianists living in a haunted house, the album is spookily familiar ... a good thing. Put some albums by The Faint and Sigúr Rós in the blender and listen as you fall asleep. It'd sound like this.

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EVENT HORIZON ()

The Cat's in the Cradle

Miss May I • Ice Nine Kills • metal • Capsize • alternative, melodic hardcore • Lorna Shore • emocore • Westwind

If you still haven't had your fill of melodic hardcore, emocore and/or emo with no chaser—and lord knows who hasn't; I still dream of Hawthorne Heights every night before jumping up from my La-Z-Boy recliner and toddling off to bed—then do yourself a solid and visit Albuquerque's home for rock…
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EVENT HORIZON ()

Are You Ready Kids?

TOKiMONSTA • electronic, hip-hop

Electronic experimentalist and heady hip-hop instrumentalist Jennifer Lee, better known as TOKiMONSTA, makes an appearance at the Historic El Rey Theater on Thursday, Sept. 28. An astral entity whose work with Project Blowed and Flying Lotus landed her squarely within the realm of El Lay’s underground hip-hop movement, Lee also happens to be a classically trained pianist. She is well known for deconstructing the work of luminaries like Justin Timberlake and Yacht through remixes that absolutely come apart in your head as the beat drops—sometimes delicately, sometimes like thunder, but always with a focus that speaks volumes about her musical prowess and wonky tendency to digress upon subtle rhythms and beatific bits of melody. $15 is all it will cost the average 18+ listener to engage in the elusive what-comes-next nature of West-Coast grooviness. The curtain rises on TokiMonsta at 9pm.
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EVENT HORIZON ()

Sorry, Not Sorry

Sorry Guero! • American death groove • Moonshine Blind • rock, country • The Lords of Wilmoore • punk rock • Cobra Vs. Mongoose

Hard rock is a thing that occasionally raises it's grizzled, drug-addled head in this dusty desert. It's a damn good thing the dude can play the guitar like ringing a bell. It also helps that the thing can sing. If not for these two crowd-pleasing aspects, Dirty City denizens would have booted Hard rock and his ilk outta this town ages ago. If you still haven't been exposed to this phenomena, may I suggest you haul your hipster ass down to Launchpad on Saturday, Sept. 30, for the album release party hosted by Burque groove-metal stalwarts Sorry Guero! The entirety of the diamond tough, blue-jean-clad, head-banging subculture who worship hard rock will be there, solidly represented by bands like hillbilly-heshers Moonshine Blind and pure punk provocateurs such the Lords of Wilmoore (eh, I lived on that street too, as an undergrad) and Cobra vs. Mongoose. So be there or be obtuse; it's only ten bones, okay?
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