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Arts

Bowling for Canines

“Goddess Gula” by Patricia Halloran
Ed Goodman
“Goddess Gula” by Patricia Halloran

Back in May, Alibi told you about Edward Goodman, the attorney and animal rescuer seeking artists to transform some humble wooden bowling pins into knockout pieces of art for a worthy cause. Happily, Goodman’s work has paid off. On Saturday, Oct. 5, Corrales will be home to Bowled and Beautiful, an art show to benefit homeless dogs. Twenty-five quirky, humorous and beautiful sculptural objects made from those vintage bowling pins—everything from toucans to saints to cat Picassos—are being sold by silent auction, with all proceeds benefiting Second Chance Animal Rescue and NMDog.

Goodman says he’s “most impressed that, with a budget of ‘zero,’ we have been able to put together a fantastic one-of-a-kind art show and fundraiser.” Indeed, judging by all the swag the event’s managed to round up, Bowled and Beautiful seems to have struck a chord with the community.

Vegetarian and vegan hors d’oeuvres are being donated by Perea’s Tijuana Bar and Restaurant, the Bistro Brewery and the Oasis Desert Bistro, while the Corrales venue, St. Gabriel’s Episcopal Church (4908B Corrales Road) has also been offered up at no charge. Even the jazz is donated, thanks to Corrales ensemble Mood Swing. Along with the artworks, products and services contributed by local businesses are up for bid in the silent auction.

With so many thousands of animals in New Mexico shelters, Bowled and Beautiful creatively tackles a serious cause. Put your bid in on a one-of-a-kind artwork to help some one-of-a-kind critters.

View in Alibi calendar calendar
Bowled and Beautiful

Art Show and Silent Auction
Saturday, Oct. 5, 7 to 10pm

St. Gabriel’s Presbyterian Church
4908B Corrales Road, Corrales
440-3208
FREE
Arts

Frontiers in Puppet Theater

Grownup puppetry comes to Albuquerque for one night

Poncili Creacion
Poncili Creacion deals in mystery.

A strange new breed of puppet makes its way to Barelas tonight. Hailing from Puerto Rico, Poncili Creacion is the latest experimental, transcendental, elemental act to grace the ring in the Tannex’s revolving circus of mysteries. What we know of their show “Sacred Candy” is wispy at best: Masks will be employed. Objects will be manipulated. Expectations will be subverted. Cosmic questions will be pondered via optics of encrypted meaning.

Blind Date
A glimpse from “Blind Date” by Josefus & Friends

“Sacred Candy” is a labyrinth you will enter in due time. First: Feast your eyes on “Blind Date,” a live puppet + projection sketch presented by Albuquerque’s own Josefus & Friends. Josefus is Joe Annabi, the multitalented member of former bands THEN EATS THEM and Yoda’s House, whose ingenious cartoons you may have spotted adorning the menu boards at Winning Coffee Co.

“I am a huge fan of the Henson style of puppetry, which was a style developed for television and film,” explains Annabi, who teaches puppet making for kids at the Zia Family Focus Center. “It's not just the technical side of the Henson school of thought that I find appealing, but also very much the aesthetic.” His “Blind Date” will feature two puppets of Annabi’s own creation, Foxi der Fuchs and Drabney Lodores (played by Jenni Bage).

The grown-up-only fun begins at 9pm at the Tannex (1417 Fourth Street SW). Cost is $5 to $10, sliding scale. “I think, between myself and Poncili, this will be a very unique performance for Albuquerque,” says Annabi. “Hopefully we can inspire more experimentation on the fringes of the usual.”

View in Alibi calendar calendar
“Sacred Candy” and Josefus

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 9 to 11pm
The Tannex

1417 Fourth Street SW
Tickets: $5 to $10
thetannex.com
arts

House of CONSPIRACY!

Third Albuquerque Toynbee Tile Found

You'll need to stand in the middle of Gold St. west of 4th to see this one
plant
You'll need to stand in the middle of Gold St. west of 4th to see this one
It was a Wednesday afternoon like any other. Business took my comrade and I to the intersection of 4th and Gold streets in downtown Albuquerque. Parking on the north side of Gold, across from the historic Simms Building, I ran across the street to deliver Alibis to a certain donut shop that operates out of the fifties-vintage steel/glass enclosure currently best known as the DEA offices on "Breaking Bad." On my return dash across the street I was keeping my eyes peeled for found money on the ground when lo and behold my psyche was confronted with the unmistakable color, shape and message of a third Albuquerque Toynbee Tile.

Watch out for that bus. Seriously.
PLANT
Watch out for that bus. Seriously.
Cleverly deployed for decades onto streets around North America and the world, Toynbee Tiles appear to have arrived in Albuquerque sometime in 2011, the same year the excellent documentary film Resurrect Dead was released. Read the original story here and find out where the second Albuquerque Toynbee Tile is here. The coda to this most recent find reads "TIME'S UP!" and there's a nifty ashtray to the right. Keep looking down.

Arts

Frederico Vigil’s Prelude to a Monument

Full-size sketches illuminate fresco master’s process

Frederico Vigil touching up one of his cartoons in the gallery at Nahalat Shalom
[click to enlarge]
Hershel Weiss
Frederico Vigil touching up one of his cartoons in the gallery at Nahalat Shalom

A fresco isn’t like a painting. You can’t just pencil out a few shapes, squeeze some acrylic out of a tube and get going. You certainly don’t freehand it. Creating a masterpiece like Frederico Vigil’s 4000-square-foot fresco in the Torreón at the National Hispanic Cultural Center requires undertaking a complex series of well-timed steps. How complex? Your guess is as good as mine, but tomorrow, Aug. 31, you can learn about the fresco process from an acknowledged master of the medium and view seven of his full-size fresco cartoons at the closing reception for “Cartones del Torreón: Full Scale Drawings for the Torreón at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.”

Along the concave wall of the Torreón, Vigil’s monumental work depicts 3 millennia of Hispanic history in buon fresco, or “true” fresco, in which pigments are suspended in water and applied directly onto wet lime plaster. A skilled artist must work quickly and precisely; the color becomes one with the plaster as it dries, making buon fresco an especially vivid and durable medium. (Rome, you know, still has some nice ones from the 13th century.) As tools for planning and composition, cartoons are a vital stage of the fresco process. In addition, they act as stencils so the artist’s lines can be transferred accurately to the freshly laid plaster.

These seven cartoons by Vigil for the Torreón fresco, unseen by the public before this exhibition, are startling artworks in their own right. Make tracks to the North Valley for your last chance to see them at Nahalat Shalom Art Gallery (3606 Rio Grande NW) from 5 to 7pm.

Closing Reception and Presentation on the Fresco Process With Frederico Vigil

Saturday, Aug. 31, 5 to 7pm
Nahalat Shalom Art Gallery
3606 Rio Grande Blvd. NW.
nahalatshalom.org
Arts

Old Man Gloom’s New Clothes: Santa Fe artist debuts Zozobra-themed group exhibition

via Robb Rael’s Facebook page
via Robb Rael’s Facebook page

Every child who attended a Santa Fe elementary school made some picture or papier-mâché version of the infamous Zozobra during their academic career. And then, if they were anything like me and my friends, they proceeded to burn at least one of these homemade depictions.

Zozobra, an often-misunderstood tradition, is as much a part of our culture as are green chile roasting and farolitos during Christmastime. For unfamiliar Burqueños or visitors to the state, Zozobra is a 50-foot-tall puppet, deemed “Old Man Gloom,” into which we cast all our troubles every autumn and watch them burn away.

However, as much as Santa Feans appreciate the tradition, very few dream of the day when Zozobra would become a thread in their lives' work. Santa Fe artist Robb Rael is an exception.

Rael organized a group show featuring satirical depictions of Zozobra. The exhibit’s opening reception happens on Sept. 6 from 5 to 8pm, and the show will run through Sept. 15. According to the Albuquerque Journal, Rael's paintings will be shown alongside the work of at least 10 other artists at his business, Get Framed Inc.

Rael’s work has long included this cultural icon. In fact, one of his designs was chosen as the official Zozobra poster in 2009. In general, his paintings tend to contain various New Mexican cultural elements and icons coupled with use of psychedelic colors and patterns. Staring at his bright, fun displays, viewers are challenged to reflect on the meanings behind them.

Though Rael has worked cooperatively with the Kiwanas Club, which hosts the burning of Zozobra, this show is independent of the annual event. While Kiwanas does display depictions of Old Man Gloom, the organization takes care to ensure that he’s not presented in religious or political contexts that may be deemed offensive. On the other hand, Rael sometimes creates to shock people, as he told the Journal.

The show, titled GLÜM – Madder Than the Old Man, will be full of color, culture and wit. Check it out at Get Framed, in the Design Center (418 Cerrillos, Suite 3, Santa Fe).

Arts

Come Over, Karl: Andrew Wyeth’s painting to be housed at Albuquerque Museum

“Karl” by Andrew Wyeth
“Karl” by Andrew Wyeth

In our Instagram world, it is rare to come across a piece of art which clearly and deliberately took many painstaking hours to create, but Albuquerque is privileged to exhibit such a work for the next five years. Andrew Wyeth's “Karl,” an egg tempura painting lent by a private curator, is now on display at the Albuquerque Museum (2000 Mountain NW).

Wyeth is one of the most popular US painters of the last century, known for his dark, somber themes and intricately detailed work. “Karl,” the portrait of a German immigrant farmer, follows suit. The painting causes the audience's eyes to focus on every last color and wrinkle in this man's face, while necessarily noting the dramatic meat hooks on the ceiling. The piece moves audiences to an appreciation of its eeriness and depth.

The portrait is displayed between notable work “A Shower in a Dry Year,” by Peter Hurd, Wyeth's brother-in-law, and the work of Wyeth's sister, Henriette Wyeth. This classic representation of American art can be viewed at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History located on 19th Street and Mountain NW in Old Town.

Arts

Off The Rails: Wells Park Rail Runner Adds Two Murals

It’s more than a visual documentation, more than graffiti taking on the moniker of a “legitimate” art piece (not that graffiti isn’t legitimate art in itself). It’s a community project that embraces the quirky world of artistic triumph. Put together by 516 ARTS and the Wells Park Neighborhood Association, in appropriate partnership with The City of Albuquerque Public Art & Urban Enhancement Program, these organizations added two new murals to the existing Wells Park Rail Runner Mural Project.

Jamison “Chas” Banks in action
Jamison “Chas” Banks in action

The project started in 2012, with four murals going up (the lead artists were Larry Bob Phillips, David Leigh, Nani Chacon, Nettrice Gaskins and Laurie Marion). Now it’s adding two new murals by Frank Buffalo Hyde and Jamison “Chas” Banks. Drawing on their Native American heritages, both artists sought to show work that not only symbolizes their cultures, but also represents the interconnectedness of artistic appreciation and the shared experience of being able to view these works forever. The newly completed murals are located in the Rail Runner Corridor, north of Downtown Albuquerque, between Mountain Rd. and I-40 along First Street.

“Inland Empire: A Suspended Animation” by Jamison “Chas” Banks
“Inland Empire: A Suspended Animation” by Jamison “Chas” Banks

“Patternation” by Frank Buffalo Hyde
“Patternation” by Frank Buffalo Hyde

Arts

Censor Me Silly: “Inappropriate” art showcase at El Chante

Los Ojos Hablan
Los Ojos Hablan
Been feeling controversial lately? Maybe even censoring yourself? Do you have a need to break free of the rusty confinement that's holding you hostage in the mundane? It's understandable—but not permanent. Just ask Tera Muskrat or Nacho Jaramillo, the two artists who are showcasing their frowned-upon and censored artwork at El Chante (804 Park SW) on Saturday, July 27.

These two artists have felt the sting of galleries and town halls turning their work away because it was deemed “inappropriate.” However the point of art is to expose the inappropriate and political. For viewers, it expresses a previously unseen vision of the world.

But instead of faltering under the mighty thumb of “the man,” Jaramillo and Muskrat are exhibiting works new and old to showcase their accomplishments and push the boundaries of what is considered art and who makes that decision. These artists' work is described as “expressions of the human body, daily life, New Mexican women, comadres and rucas assisting their comadre on her journey to Chimayo or a night out at the Saints and Sinners bar to the faces of raza, Chicanos, Matachines and compadres deep in emotion where their eyes speak of life experiences.”

New Mexico Calendar Girls
New Mexico Calendar Girls

Jaramillo's Los Ojos Hablan exhibition showcases multiple iterations of his contemporary eye, from the use of simplistic brush strokes to 3D panels and “androgynous characters that consume you with their eyes.” And Muskrat's New Mexico Calendar Girls exhibition takes the traditional female form of yesteryear and places them within a contemporary setting to show the authentic beauty and multi-faceted integrity that lies within the natural New Mexican woman.

The opening reception starts at 6 p.m. and ends around 8:30 p.m. So, if you're in the mood to see some artwork that'll make you think, make you question and ultimately make you proud of this beautiful, crazy state we live in, make sure you get there on time. Oh, and there's gonna be “food, music y mas.” Can't beat that. The show runs through August 11.

Arts

Prepaid Party

ArtBar stimulates thirst for arts endeavors

Jeremy Shattuck
Artists famously drink to stimulate inspiration. However, at ArtBar, the money artists spend goes into the community and perhaps back into their own pockets as well.

ArtBar, an arm of Catalyst Club Inc., is a members-only performance space and bar created to support local art. They accomplish this by donating their annual net profits to various art-based nonprofits around New Mexico. (See previous Alibi coverage here.) It’s a unique idea that came to fruition last week when ArtBar opened its doors on July 11 to its founding members.

The venue was spacious, accentuated by high ceilings and sizeable windows that skirted much of the building. A large chandelier hung near the stage, refracting light onto excited art lovers, sponsors, organizers and artistes alike. The alluring aroma of Lobster Mac n Cheese drifted from a small kitchen operated by The Supper Truck. Large black comfy couches provided space to sip Bulleit Bourbon and people watch: skinny jeans-wearing hipsters, artsy girls in bright summer dresses, suited professionals and sandal-wearing vacation types. A well-stocked bar, despite its small beer selection, quenched the thirst of members as they danced to Carlos the Tall, a local cover band.

Jeremy Shattuck

Though the opening night party went off without a hitch, ArtBar is still finding its footing in terms of target audience. The decor felt a little sterile, aside from a cool red light along the bar and a few paintings. It was suggested to me that the lack of original music and art on display represented a missed opportunity to get the local art community involved. Striking a balance between a youthful, beer-drinking, artistic crowd and an older and likely wealthier one will be essential to ArtBar’s survival. Hopefully, further artist involvement will become an integral part of this balance as they continue to grow.

With membership at $30 per year, ArtBar is an easy way to give back to the art community. A membership can be purchased at the door or from their website. I mean really, where else can you practice philanthropy by simply drinking a delicious beverage?

ArtBar by Catalyst Club

119 Gold SW
254-8393 - catalystclubnm.org

Hours: 4 p.m.to 12 a.m. Sunday through Thursday, 4 p.m.to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday

Membership: $30 per year. Includes personal guests for members.
Arts

Art Against the Brutal Tide

Local activist brings a million bones to Washington

50,000 artwork bones were laid at Fourth and Central in 2011
onemillionbones.org
50,000 artwork bones were laid at Fourth and Central in 2011
Nearly two years ago, Alibi writer Summer Olsson told you about the One Million Bones art exhibition, an ambitious large-scale project designed to honor victims and survivors of genocide in Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burma and Somalia. Both a disturbing reminder of the human cost of mass atrocities and a fundraiser to anti-genocide organizations, the project is finally coming to a head this weekend in Washington D.C., where one million bones will be laid out in the National Mall.

On August 27, 2011, a preview installation of 50,000 bones was placed at the intersection of Fourth and Central by Albuquerque volunteers. Now, after three years of planning, education and hard work, the complete exhibit will unfold June 8 through 10 in our nation's capital. Each one of the million artwork bones, handmade by students, artists and activists from around the world, "represents a call to action, a story, a voice."

Play Youtube Video
The One Million Bones Albuquerque event in 2011

The project, which was born in Albuquerque, is headed by Naomi Natale. Speakers and performers, including Albuquerque's Poet Laureate Hakim Bellamy, will be present, and a candlelight vigil will take place Sunday evening.

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