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Marcia Sednek knows whimsy.
photos courtesy of Mariposa Gallery
Marcia Sednek knows whimsy.

Arts

All the Pretty Dresses

Artist Marcia Sednek twists and bends each forgotten and worn object into a wonderful piece of sartorial art.
“Our Lady of Sorrows” retablo by Salvador Carriaga Lambert
“Our Lady of Sorrows” retablo by Salvador Carriaga Lambert

Arts

Art and Devotion

El Chante hosts a community art show highlighting culture and faith

The Art of Devotion promises a Saturday night filled with culture, tradition and faith.
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Oh, Banksy, you so crazy ...
[click to enlarge]
Oh, Banksy, you so crazy ...

Arts

Better Out Than In: Britain’s Banksy Hops Across the Pond

Banksy has hit Broadway.

Today marks the tenth day of British street artist Banksy’s “residency on the streets of New York.” The artist’s website proudly declares that his famous—some might say infamous—work will be surfacing on the streets of the city that never sleeps for the month of October. The exhibit is titled Better Out Than In.

So far, there has been a new piece on a wall or vehicle every day—with the exception of the day when Banksy posted an ambiguous but clearly opinionated YouTube video on the Syrian War to his site. Among the street art is an intricately detailed rainforest scene in the back of an old delivery truck, the addition of the words “The Musical” to random graffiti around the city (ex. “Occupy! The Musical”) and the popular “THIS IS MY NEW YORK ACCENT … normally I write like this” spray-painting (below) on the Westside. All pieces are viewable on the street artist’s website and are now accompanied by a numbered tag, and a tongue-in-cheek audio component accessible by Banksy’s 800 number, 1-800-656-4271.

More than a week in, and it seems as if the city of New York hasn't yet decided how to respond to Banksy’s pieces. While the first was painted over within 24 hours—as the satirical American voice at the other end of the 800 number predicted—others are rapidly being removed from their original locations to auction. This presents an interesting dilemma; some wonder if—in such a cultured city—removing the murals is preservation of art or its destruction. According to The Guardian, Bristol's City Council polled citizens a few years ago about Banksy's art, and 97 percent voted that when a Banksy image appeared in public domain, it should remain.

While this conundrum is certainly one to mull over, this may be a good time to recognize some of Albuquerque’s own great street art, sanctioned and otherwise. Albuquerque, another city rich in art and culture, has long integrated street art into the urban landscape. Three years ago, 516 Arts hosted an event called STREET ART: A Celebration of Hip-Hop Culture and Free Expression, which left street murals around downtown Albuquerque. Participating artists included Chris Stain, who left a large painting of a solemn, silhouetted working man at Second and Central. Native Burqueño Ernest Doty was charged as the controversial, anonymous Rainbow Warrior, a street artist who spilled smile-inducing spectrums over buildings across the city. At least one of these rainbows remain untouched; whether that's due to cultural appreciation or inability to cover them up, I couldn’t say.

For more street works around the Duke City, check out the Street Art Albuquerque Facebook Page, which includes photos of acrylic and spray-painted works and the streets where they’re located. And to keep up with Banksy’s exhibit from the Duke City, visit the site or check out the #banskyny tag on Instagram.(Disclaimer: This blog is not intended to motivate all artistic adolescents to begin scribbling property that is not your own; some things are best left to the, er, more experienced.)

“Goddess Gula” by Patricia Halloran
Ed Goodman
“Goddess Gula” by Patricia Halloran

Arts

Bowling for Canines

Back in May, Alibi told you about Edward Goodman, the attorney and animal rescuer seeking artists to transform some humble wooden bowling pins into knockout pieces of art for a worthy cause. Happily, Goodman’s work has paid off. On Saturday, Oct. 5, Corrales will be home to Bowled and Beautiful, an art show to benefit homeless dogs. Twenty-five quirky, humorous and beautiful sculptural objects made from those vintage bowling pins—everything from toucans to saints to cat Picassos—are being sold by silent auction, with all proceeds benefiting Second Chance Animal Rescue and NMDog.

Goodman says he’s “most impressed that, with a budget of ‘zero,’ we have been able to put together a fantastic one-of-a-kind art show and fundraiser.” Indeed, judging by all the swag the event’s managed to round up, Bowled and Beautiful seems to have struck a chord with the community.

Vegetarian and vegan hors d’oeuvres are being donated by Perea’s Tijuana Bar and Restaurant, the Bistro Brewery and the Oasis Desert Bistro, while the Corrales venue, St. Gabriel’s Episcopal Church (4908B Corrales Road) has also been offered up at no charge. Even the jazz is donated, thanks to Corrales ensemble Mood Swing. Along with the artworks, products and services contributed by local businesses are up for bid in the silent auction.

With so many thousands of animals in New Mexico shelters, Bowled and Beautiful creatively tackles a serious cause. Put your bid in on a one-of-a-kind artwork to help some one-of-a-kind critters.

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Poncili Creacion
Poncili Creacion deals in mystery.

Arts

Frontiers in Puppet Theater

Grownup puppetry comes to Albuquerque for one night

A strange new breed of puppet makes its way to Barelas tonight. Hailing from Puerto Rico, Poncili Creacion is the latest experimental oddity debuting at the Tannex.
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You'll need to stand in the middle of Gold St. west of 4th to see this one
plant
You'll need to stand in the middle of Gold St. west of 4th to see this one

arts

House of CONSPIRACY!

Third Albuquerque Toynbee Tile Found

It was a Wednesday afternoon like any other. Business took my comrade and I to the intersection of 4th and Gold streets in downtown Albuquerque. Parking on the north side of Gold, across from the historic Simms Building, I ran across the street to deliver Alibis to a certain donut shop that operates out of the fifties-vintage steel/glass enclosure currently best known as the DEA offices on "Breaking Bad." On my return dash across the street I was keeping my eyes peeled for found money on the ground when lo and behold my psyche was confronted with the unmistakable color, shape and message of a third Albuquerque Toynbee Tile.

Cleverly deployed for decades onto streets around North America and the world, Toynbee Tiles appear to have arrived in Albuquerque sometime in 2011, the same year the excellent documentary film Resurrect Dead was released. Read the original story here and find out where the second Albuquerque Toynbee Tile is here. The coda to this most recent find reads "TIME'S UP!" and there's a nifty ashtray to the right. Keep looking down.

Frederico Vigil touching up one of his cartoons in the gallery at Nahalat Shalom
[click to enlarge]
Hershel Weiss
Frederico Vigil touching up one of his cartoons in the gallery at Nahalat Shalom

Arts

Frederico Vigil’s Prelude to a Monument

Full-size sketches illuminate fresco master’s process

Don’t miss your chance to see Frederico Vigil’s vast preliminary sketches for the Torreón fresco.
via Robb Rael’s Facebook page
via Robb Rael’s Facebook page

Arts

Old Man Gloom’s New Clothes: Santa Fe artist debuts Zozobra-themed group exhibition

Every child who attended a Santa Fe elementary school made some picture or papier-mâché version of the infamous Zozobra during their academic career. And then, if they were anything like me and my friends, they proceeded to burn at least one of these homemade depictions.

Zozobra, an often-misunderstood tradition, is as much a part of our culture as are green chile roasting and farolitos during Christmastime. For unfamiliar Burqueños or visitors to the state, Zozobra is a 50-foot-tall puppet, deemed “Old Man Gloom,” into which we cast all our troubles every autumn and watch them burn away.

However, as much as Santa Feans appreciate the tradition, very few dream of the day when Zozobra would become a thread in their lives' work. Santa Fe artist Robb Rael is an exception.

Rael organized a group show featuring satirical depictions of Zozobra. The exhibit’s opening reception happens on Sept. 6 from 5 to 8pm, and the show will run through Sept. 15. According to the Albuquerque Journal, Rael's paintings will be shown alongside the work of at least 10 other artists at his business, Get Framed Inc.

Rael’s work has long included this cultural icon. In fact, one of his designs was chosen as the official Zozobra poster in 2009. In general, his paintings tend to contain various New Mexican cultural elements and icons coupled with use of psychedelic colors and patterns. Staring at his bright, fun displays, viewers are challenged to reflect on the meanings behind them.

Though Rael has worked cooperatively with the Kiwanas Club, which hosts the burning of Zozobra, this show is independent of the annual event. While Kiwanas does display depictions of Old Man Gloom, the organization takes care to ensure that he’s not presented in religious or political contexts that may be deemed offensive. On the other hand, Rael sometimes creates to shock people, as he told the Journal.

The show, titled GLÜM – Madder Than the Old Man, will be full of color, culture and wit. Check it out at Get Framed, in the Design Center (418 Cerrillos, Suite 3, Santa Fe).

“Karl” by Andrew Wyeth
“Karl” by Andrew Wyeth

Arts

Come Over, Karl: Andrew Wyeth’s painting to be housed at Albuquerque Museum

In our Instagram world, it is rare to come across a piece of art which clearly and deliberately took many painstaking hours to create, but Albuquerque is privileged to exhibit such a work for the next five years. Andrew Wyeth's “Karl,” an egg tempura painting lent by a private curator, is now on display at the Albuquerque Museum (2000 Mountain NW).

Wyeth is one of the most popular US painters of the last century, known for his dark, somber themes and intricately detailed work. “Karl,” the portrait of a German immigrant farmer, follows suit. The painting causes the audience's eyes to focus on every last color and wrinkle in this man's face, while necessarily noting the dramatic meat hooks on the ceiling. The piece moves audiences to an appreciation of its eeriness and depth.

The portrait is displayed between notable work “A Shower in a Dry Year,” by Peter Hurd, Wyeth's brother-in-law, and the work of Wyeth's sister, Henriette Wyeth. This classic representation of American art can be viewed at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History located on 19th Street and Mountain NW in Old Town.

Jamison “Chas” Banks in action
Jamison “Chas” Banks in action

Arts

Off The Rails: Wells Park Rail Runner Adds Two Murals

It’s more than a visual documentation, more than graffiti taking on the moniker of a “legitimate” art piece (not that graffiti isn’t legitimate art in itself). It’s a community project that embraces the quirky world of artistic triumph. Put together by 516 ARTS and the Wells Park Neighborhood Association, in appropriate partnership with The City of Albuquerque Public Art & Urban Enhancement Program, these organizations added two new murals to the existing Wells Park Rail Runner Mural Project.

The project started in 2012, with four murals going up (the lead artists were Larry Bob Phillips, David Leigh, Nani Chacon, Nettrice Gaskins and Laurie Marion). Now it’s adding two new murals by Frank Buffalo Hyde and Jamison “Chas” Banks. Drawing on their Native American heritages, both artists sought to show work that not only symbolizes their cultures, but also represents the interconnectedness of artistic appreciation and the shared experience of being able to view these works forever. The newly completed murals are located in the Rail Runner Corridor, north of Downtown Albuquerque, between Mountain Rd. and I-40 along First Street.


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DOUBLE FEATURE @THE GUILD
DOUBLE FEATURE @THE GUILD1.16.2015