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V.25 No.35 | 09/01/2016

The Daily Word in Slave Labor, NASA and Honeybees

The Daily Word

A new study gives insight into treating anxiety disorders. Scientists determine that the key isn't simply lowering cortisol levels in the brain, it's lowering them in particular areas of the brain.

NASA always seems to be working on something mind-blowing and certainly larger than life. These days, it's a mission for a spacecraft called Osiris-Rex. Ever wondered what ingredients were involved in the making of the solar system? This spacecraft aims to follow a 500 meter, carbon-rich asteroid holding the answers.

Coffee is an essential component in many Americans' lives, but how much do you think about the origin of your precious roast? Not to put a damper on your beautiful, caffeinated morning but you can most likely thank slave labor for that latte.

Wake me up when the election ends.

I can almost smell musty pages and feel the buzzing yearning for knowledge from here.

In an attempt to kill mosquitoes carrying Zika virus, an aerial pesticide sprayed in South Carolina killed millions of honeybees. The sweet creatures crawled from their hives to escape the poison but died just outside the entrance.

It's bat season! Carlsbad Caverns National Park is home to hundreds of bats that head to Mexico when the weather gets chilly (so, right about now). Before you take a road trip to watch them pour out of the caves at dusk, here's some info about these little winged creatures.

Would you run 8.8 miles to school every day while barefoot? This guy would (and did). Read about the importance of education to Uganda native James Arinaitwe, who gladly took the lengthy journey to learn in his youth.

V.25 No.28 | 07/14/2016

Event Horizon

Hark! A Shark!

Saturday, Jul 23: Shark Discovery Day

Learn about sharks' amazing adaptations, keen senses, important roles in ocean ecosystems and meet the resident sharks.
V.25 No.26 | 06/30/2016

Event Horizon

Raise Your Voice

Tuesday, Jul 12: UNM Seal Forum

The first of a series of discussions with the public about the meaning and future of the seal of UNM.
V.25 No.18 | 05/05/2016
/ Public Domain

Event Horizon

Kids These Days

Friday, May 13: The First Annual ABQ STEM Fiesta

Science, technology, engineering and math activities for all ages.
V.25 No.14 | 04/07/2016

The Daily Word in Health Services, Education and Dollar Stores

The Daily Word

There was a progressive victory in Las Cruces even in the face of 50 to 1 spending from the opposition.

The Lt. Gov. takes to facebook to share in the incendiary rhetoric revolving around UNM Health Sciences Center's relationship with Soutwestern Women's Options.

A popular Taos teacher is leaving education citing Martinez and Skandera's teacher evaluation polices.

And here are some of the repercussions for the governor's wise choices around state health services providers.

There's lots of toxic crap on the shelves at dollar stores. That may at least partially explain the weird smell made by my wine glass shaped sippy-cup.

V.25 No.11 | 03/17/2016

Literature

Teaching Across Cultural Strengths

UNM Associate Professor Alicia Chávez will be at the UNM Bookstore on Thursday, April 7, at 12pm to sign copies of Teaching Across Cultural Strengths (Stylus, 2016).

In Teaching Across Cultural Strengths, Chávez suggests that an imbalance in the teaching and learning situation exists when the teacher teaches from one cultural perspective and the student's primary learning experiences come from another cultural perspective. To enhance the possibility that the student will master the learning situation and achieve its deep objectives, it is important that college teachers expand their cultural reach and include multicultural perspectives in the teaching and learning situations. Teaching Across Cultural
Strengths offers a comprehensive set of guidelines based on a sound theoretical foundation, and empirical research that will enable college teachers to narrow the gap in cross cultural teaching and student learning.

Alicia Chávez is an Associate Professor in Educational Leadership and Policy at UNM. She has served as collegiate leader, student affairs professional, and faculty member in universities around the country. Chávez has also co-authored several books on culture and college teaching, including Web Based Teaching Across Culture and Age (Springer, 2013).

The UNM Bookstore is located at 2301 Central Ave. NE at the intersection of Cornell and Central.

TEDxABQ Facebook

Event Horizon

No Equality Found (Yet)

Friday, Mar 25: TEDxABQ: Equity in Education

Lectures on how education can progress in a positive way.

The Daily Word in War Crimes, Education and Walter White

The Daily Word

Women taking care of other women gives me hope (and also makes me continuously angry because we need to do this but WHATEVER).

It’s a witchy world for us ladies, amirite?

Invisibility cloaks (ya know, like from Harry Potter) may be available for war crimes soon! Wow!

Michelle Obama’s speech about girls’ education around the world is perfect.

We should have known Walter White left Gray Matter for a stupid reason (because he’s a dumb awful idiot).

Oliva Wilde was too old to play Leo D.’s wife in Wolf of Wall Street. He was 38 and she was 28.

Have you heard of these vigilante pedophile hunters?

We should have known that '90s boybands would save the world.

V.25 No.6 | 02/11/2016

Literature

What Makes a Snowflake?

A local author visits Page One Books to read his new children's book on snowflakes.
V.25 No.4 | 01/28/2016

Vote for Education

If you’re a registered voter living in the Albuquerque area (particularly if you’re in the APS district), tomorrow is an important day! A vote regarding educational bonds affecting APS, CNM and local charter schools is taking place. This could increase CNM’s capital mill levy $1 million (they haven’t gotten an increase since 1996) and APS and charter schools' capital mill levy to $575 million. Capital mill levy means the money would go towards construction, renovations, operating expenses, etc. And guess what! This won’t increase taxes!!! Whaaaaat!

So stop complaining about having to do shit and help out your local community and economy by voting! Look to see where the nearest voting center is here and if you have any more doubts, watch these videos. See y’all at the polls!

V.25 No.4 | 1/28/2016
Poverty

Opinion

The Kids are Not Alright

Study finds N.M. children at the bottom of the poverty list

poverty -> poor education -> poor tech economy -> poverty
V.25 No.3 | 01/21/2016

School Daze

We've been talking a lot about the educational system here at the Alibi recently, which you can read more about in the latest issue that's available 'til Jan. 27 (get it while you can). I’m going to recount some of my best and worst educational experiences. My time in the public (and briefly private-ish) educational system was a wild ride, and within most of my memory, not a good one. Let’s see why!

When I was in second grade I was sexually harassed by a boy in my class. Over the school year he gathered other boys to chase me and harass me. When I would complain to teachers they would tell me something like, “Oh he just likes you!” or “Boys will be boys. Ignore him and he’ll stop.” My best friend was the only person who took me seriously. She would chase him and threaten him back, which would stop them for a while, but since she was in the grade above me, she couldn’t always be there. I started dissociating around this time.

In third grade I was placed in the same class as my harasser again, even though I had made many complaints about his behavior. I remember I cried all night the day before classes started because I was so afraid to be in the same space with him again. My mom fought most of the year trying to get the school administration to change their decision but they said all the other classes were full. Because I was in the same class as this kid again, I was nervous and distracted all the time. My teacher would yell at me a lot for a few reasons: I didn’t pay attention, I collected rocks from the playground (which I guess was stealing school property) and because I had a hard time doing math.

Nothing particularly notable happened until middle school (or maybe it did and I just can’t remember because of the dissociation junk). One of my best friends who had an aptitude for math was yelled at by our math teacher because he didn’t show his work. He explained that he didn’t show his work because he could do it all in his head and out teacher said he couldn’t and was probably cheating.

Our humanities teacher, on the other hand, was very funny and somewhat imperious (though, I suppose most adults are at that age). He encouraged me to write like there was no tomorrow. It was his last year teaching at our school, so at the end of the year I wrote him a poem about how I would miss him and how he really helped me and he cried. We both were proud.

My seventh grade science teacher was absolutely ridiculous. I asked her a question about some type of rock and she actually responded, “Because God made it that way, sweetie.”

My eighth grade history teacher was also very encouraging to me as a writer. For a paper about an event during the American Revolution, I wrote it how I thought a journalist during that time would write it, and after I read it to the class she asked me if I plagiarized it. She didn’t mean it to be insulting (though I was offended, cuz I write gr8) she was just incredibly surprised that a young teenager could write like that so convincingly.

At the beginning of high school I went to a charter school. During the first semester, while my humanities teacher was giving a lecture, I raised my hand because I had a question (like ya do), and then she stopped her lecture and yelled at me for interrupting her.

By the time tenth grade began, I started going to a public school. My anxiety and depression were the worst I had ever experienced in my life at that point (within memory). Thankfully all of my teachers were incredibly kind and eager to teach.

My class schedule was a bit unusual because I went to a school with a different curriculum the year before. I was kind of behind in science (I had taken the class that juniors took at that school, but I hadn’t taken what freshmen took) and ahead in history. So in my science class I was with a lot of kids who had failed it many times. The kid who sat behind me tried to feel me up one day and the teacher didn’t even write him up. Another kid would bother me constantly about dating him which made me extremely uncomfortable. The teacher was nice but he didn’t protect me, which I resent.

My history teacher was completely different. She was lively, intelligent and treated her students how they treated her. She taught me to be studious, respect myself and to stand up for myself. I felt safe in her classroom.
My English teacher was hilarious, kind and patient. I felt like I could be myself around him and I felt safe in his classroom, too. He taught me to be critical and seriously inquire about things and to be confident about my writing and my awkwardness.

By the time eleventh grade started, the school system (and therefore a lot of teachers) began to rely heavily on technology. I remember in one class in particular—my English class—if the computer didn’t work for some reason, we weren’t going to be taught that day. This forced technological shift was particularly difficult for me because I’ve always learned best by actually doing something, not reading about doing things or being told how to.

My first English class in college didn’t go well. My teacher talked to everyone like we were children and was noticeably nicer to the guys in class. Once she gave me a paper back telling me to make the exact corrections that she made and I would get an A. I did what she said and got a D on the paper.

My second English class was a completely different experience. My teacher was incredibly kind, exceptionally encouraging and inspirational. It was her last semester teaching, which is a shame because I wanted to take more or her classes.

I ended up giving up on college because—much like the forced technological shift I experienced my junior year—it was too much reading about doing things and not enough doing for me. Regardless of my bad experiences, I’m extremely grateful for the educational opportunities I’ve had because at the end of the day, I learned something.

V.25 No.3 | 1/21/2016
Skipping
Tamara Sutton

Education

The Kids are Alright

Memoirs of an educational assistant

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” Dickens was talking about teaching when he wrote that, right?
Runnin Jewels
Rob

Education

Expanding the Achievement Gap

The privatization of education in the days of No Child Left Behind

When test scores become the pinnacle of academic achievement, teachers and students alike are done a great disservice.
KerryTron

Education

Post Post Modern Learning

CNM's tech department gears up for the future

CNM’s Computer Information Systems department is obviously where you should find yourself if you're looking to begin a career in technologies, or if you're a professional interested in learning about whatever amazing breakthroughs have happened since breakfast.

Today's Events

Shift Dance Festival at VSA North 4th Art Center

Kelsey Paschich
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Unique choreographic voices, points of views and movement styles from dancers Allie Hankins, Jacqueline Stewart, Jacqueline M. García, Lisa Nevada and Kelsey Paschich.

Dine and Glow at Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum

Get the Led Out • Led Zepplin tribute at Sunshine Theater

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