National Museum of Nuclear Science and History


V.25 No.42 | 10/20/2016

Event Horizon

Mars in a Handbasket

Saturday, Oct 29: Generation Beyond: Mars Experience Bus

Kids experience traveling to Mars in a virtual reality bus, taking a tour along the surface of the Red Planet.
V.24 No.30 | 7/23/2015
News Monkey

Crib Notes

Crib Notes: July 23, 2015

Study the petroglyphs carefully if you want to pass this Albuquerque news quiz.
V.23 No.26 |
Manchester City Library CC by 2.0

Alibi Picks

Bravely Said: 4 Voices on the 4th

It makes sense to welcome the 4th of July with stirring words artfully arranged—poetry seems to run in America’s veins. It connect us with our ideals and national hopes, whether or not we’ve yet achieved them. In 4 Voices on the 4th, the Museum of the American Military Family presents the voices of veterans and their family members woven into a powerful, poetic “collage performance.”

They join a long literary history. “The Yankees will hang their heads up high,” acknowledged a British officer in “The Battle of Bunker Hill,” written after a 1775 military clash that proved American troops wouldn’t be easily routed. Boston poet Robert Lowell connected the Civil War to his own milieu in 1960’s “For the Union Dead”: “The stone statues of the abstract Union Soldier/ grow slimmer and younger each year—/ wasp-waisted, they doze over muskets and muse through their sideburns…” At 2pm, hear Caroline LeBlanc, Circe Olson Woessner, Karin Bradberry and Jacqueline Murray Loring at the Museum of Nuclear Science and History (601 Eubank SE), and while you’re there, visit the Sacrifice & Service: The American Military Family exhibit, honoring the sometimes unacknowledged heroes of our nation’s defense. See nuclearmuseum.org or call 245-2137 for more info. Before you head out for fireworks and beer on Friday, take some time to remind yourself why we’re celebrating. National Museum of Nuclear Science and History • Fri Jul 4 • 2-3pm • Included with regular admission • View on Alibi calendar

V.22 No.5 |
NASA PHOTO

Alibi Picks

View from Afar

Earth From Space

Sometimes, in order for something to be seen clearly, we need to take a step back and look at it from a distance, with a new perspective. The same goes for our planet. Since the first color image of the world from space was captured from a NASA weather capsule in 1967, scientists have been using such data to better understand life on earth. Tomorrow, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History will open an exhibit titled Earth from Space. This 20-poster set features beautiful images from across the globe that illustrate how satellite imagery is gathered, what sorts of technologies are used to gather it, and how this information is used to better mankind's understanding of the third rock from the sun. The display is available for view daily through April, and admission is $8 for adults and $7 for students, seniors and youth. National Museum of Nuclear Science and History • Sat Feb 2 • 9 am-5 pm • $7-$8 • View on Alibi calendar