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V.25 No.38 | 09/22/2016

Event Horizon

Got Minerals?

Friday, Sep 30: Fall Gem, Mineral and Jewelry Show

Browse gemstones, mineral specimens, rough rock, slabs, jewelry, beads, cabochons, fossils, tools and equipment.
Igor and The Red Elvises
Rene Thompson

Music

In Review: Igor and The Red Elvises

The Russian rockabilly surf rock band, The Red Elvises, have been coming to Albuquerque for years and at one point had a pretty massive local following when they would roll into town at the very least once a year. Those that have gone to their shows become nostalgic for their showmanship and inventive sounds. One cannot help but want to dance to and join in on their audience immersive gigs.

These days though, there is only one original member left in the band that was founded in 1995. They’ve changed their name to Igor and The Red Elvises, maybe because it just isn’t quite the same show or band with different members.

It was unfortunate to see that only a small number of people came to the show on Tuesday. This may be part of a larger issue; many millennials out and about downtown are no longer going to see bands play anymore, but seem more interested in hip hop and EDM.

The newer members of The Red Elvises play the same songs as the other incarnations of the bad did, and have even added a few new ones to their repertoire, but the show itself is different. The new singer does not have a Russian accent, that is an aspect that made the band what it used to be. The fervor was gone and replaced with a younger and not as lively group.

I must admit I hadn’t seen them play in years, and don’t get me wrong, every single one of the new band members are talented in their own right, especially their new horn player—she is a badass—but also their formerly infamous red balalaika bass was not being twirled about and used as a show prop as it once was. Essentially the show didn’t have the flair it once had. This could be due to Bernov, the previous bassist, quitting the band in 2009 to join the circus as a clown with a group called Slava's Snowshow.

But things do happen. Something that was made notable by Russian accents, grandiloquence and sheer soul to play had been changed and ended up sort of lost on a younger audience. Unfortunately this gig missed the mark of their usually grandiose shows.

According to their bio, showman extraordinaire Igor Yuzov is “perpetually globetrotting, and in the process he has found scores of wildly talented, entertaining musicians to bring into the fold of this increasingly international party band,” and it’s understandable that sometimes bands need to change to keep thriving.

Maybe it’s that I was hoping to see the show I had memories of from in my youth, but sometimes bands develop into something else entirely, even though they're playing the same music. And sometimes older fans are either going to embrace it or they’re not.

The new musicians added to the group and they did put on a great show. Anyone looking to go have a great time dancing to fun and upbeat vibes will thoroughly enjoy the newly evolved Red Elvises, especially if they play Launchpad again.

V.25 No.37 | 09/15/2016
Blink 182
IllaZilla

Event Horizon

Blink and You'll Miss It

Sunday, Sep 25: Blink-182

Prove it wasn't a phase to your mom.

Event Horizon

District 505

Saturday, Sep 24: International District Festival

A showcase of the diverse art, food and entertainers from the southeast area of Albuquerque.

The Daily Word in Terence Crutcher, Keith Lamont and Police Brutality

[ Wed Sep 21 2016 11:21 AM ]
The Daily Word

Two brewing companies are opening up shop Downtown.

Astronomers found some blobs within some other blobs (scientifically speaking).

Archeologists have discovered human remains at the largest shipwreck which was also where the Antikythera Mechanism was found.

Five medical personal were killed after the collapse of the cease-fire in Syria.

A 13-year-old boy was shot this month by police while playing with a BB gun.

Tulsa police fatally shot an unarmed man on Friday.

Charlotte police say fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott was holding a “gun.”

Since Colin Kaepernick has started his silent protest on Aug. 26, 15 black people have been shot during police encounters.

V.25 No.36 | 09/08/2016

The Daily Word in Facebook, Literal Blazin' and Spoopy Things

[ Wed Sep 14 2016 12:08 PM ]
The Daily Word

Blaze it but not like this.

What happens when the downstairs goes into the upstairs?

How spoopy was The Blair Witch Project in real life?

Down with data caps!

#omg You need to watch this short film Carrie Brownstein made #iLiterallyCannot

Facebook is comin' to New Mexico!

Weekly Weather Report

Week of Sept. 13-19

Today through Thursday it will be partly cloudy with a high of about 82° and not much of a chance of precipitation throughout the day. Friday will be sunny with a high of 83°. Saturday thunderstorms should pop up across the world, particularly on the East Side of Albuquerque, causing damnation for about 50-90% of the Earth's population (pesky holy water monsoons). Skies clear up for the end of the weekend on through to next week. See you next week, sinner!

Tourist in her own Town

Another Weekend in Review

Revisiting Albuquerque like it was the first time
Courtesy of the author

Creative Non-Fiction

"He Had a Far Out Decorator"

As 1991 began, I lived north the university. That year, it happened the weather did not get really cold until the end of January. There were patches of ice on the sidewalks near my house, also near the apartment of my friend, Kenneth W. Seward.

Seward was a lighting designer whom I worked with at the University of New Mexico. I had recently graduated from art school. I worked at Keller Hall, in the department of Music. Seward studied in the Theatre department and held a part-time job at the concert hall.

We were friends, collaborating on multi-media projects, discussing literature and music, generally encouraging the other’s reading and art-making. We were both Eagle Scouts; we both played the piano. But while I struggled with the instrument, he killed it–gracefully and courageously hammering out Beethoven while I kept getting lost after a dozen bars.

Listen: In those halcyon days, Ken was dying of a brain tumor. At the end of the previous summer, he had come into my office and complained of numbness in his hands, a dark circumstance for a manipulator of lights and electricity. Concerned, I suggested he go to the student health center.

One thing then led to another. By mid-autumn 1990, he had been diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme, a deadly type of brain cancer.

By January he had lost the ability to walk and manipulate tools and therefore, to work. His parents were in California. He had become estranged from them for he was gay and they could not accept that fact.

But he had loads of friends in Burque. We pitched in to help him. We all took turns keeping him company, taking him to the UNM Cancer Center, feeding and bathing him while Bartok and Gilbert and Sullivan played in the background.

When his parents finally arrived to make their peace in February, I resignedly noted that his father looked more like Ken than Ken did.

Kenneth W. Seward died on March 6, 1991 while I was eating lunch at the New Chinatown with some deadhead buddies of mine. That day, beautiful puffy clouds filled the sky over dirt city and it rained and rained that night. The next week, the College of Fine Arts held a glorious memorial service for him in Rodey Theater.

I kept a picture of him on the crew bulletin board at Keller Hall. In the picture he looked young and brave and full of life, holding a crescent wrench in his hand, smiling up towards the bright lights that beckoned him.

Soon after Ken died, I broke up with my long-time girlfriend. She was a classical musician. I'd like to believe we drifted apart during Seward’s illness, but the truth was much simpler and profoundly more tragic. I was a hipster; she was L-7.

After all of that, spring came, anyway. It was warm again; the grass was greenly lush at the duck pond. I kept busy by painting large abstract, loathsomely bright pictures and managing the concert hall.

Sometime in late March, some news went around the Fine Arts Center. The Dalai Lama was going to be visiting the university and would be speaking at Popejoy Hall.

I knew little about the man. The organization Friends of Tibet had occasionally visited the college, had brought around a group of touring monks to entertain and perplex the patrons of art and music who haunted the foyer. These followers of the lama performed traditional dances and chants and were magically entrancing to those who had the privilege of attending.

Coincidentally, my roommate, a graduate student in art history, was a devout Buddhist. He filled me in on concepts and events related to Tibetan Buddhism and the preeminence of the fourteenth Dalai Lama.

Anyway, it came to pass the Dalai Lama and his entourage needed a place to camp out before his speaking engagement. These were in the days before UNM renovated the Fine Arts Center. Much of it was an unkempt old joint–that included the Popejoy Hall green room, which was mostly a place the technical crew hung out to smoke and nap.

Owing to the fact that Keller hall was a genteel venue where chamber music and avant-garde compositions were performed, its green room was chosen as a headquarters for the visitors. The Keller Hall Green Room was tastefully decorated, well furnished and looked out onto a small verdant garden.

When the day arrived, the Dalai Lama was driven to the loading dock in back of the UNM art museum. Advisers, a meteorologist with magical abilities, members of Friends of Tibet and a small press corps accompanied him. Though he had recently won the Nobel Prize, he was not nearly as famous as he is now; the issues surrounding Tibet had just begun to creep into the public’s consciousness.

His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso was immediately whisked to the Keller Hall green room, where different dignitaries, including the President of the University, came and went, presenting him with fresh fruit and prayer shawls.

Late in the afternoon, I noticed there was an empty space on the couch next to the lama, so I went over and sat down next to him.

He looked over and remarked, “You are brave!” He put his arm around me, said something in Tibetan to the monk sitting next to him and continued, “Don’t worry,” he whispered, “everything will be fine.” He laughed. It was a deep and happy laugh.

Then motioned to one of his advisers and the two got up from their seats. The lama needed some time alone, to eat and meditate, the adviser told everyone in the room.

The Dalai Lama waved at me, then retired to the downstairs lounge in Keller Hall. Later I was asked by one of his aides to join his procession over to Popejoy Hall. I didn’t have another opportunity to speak to him, though. He and his followers left soon after the event was over.

The rest of that spring and then the summer seemed to zip right on by. I finished a decent painting, figured out a tune by Bartok and then welded together a sculpture that held a bit of Ken’s ashes inside of it. When someone stole it from in front of the Art Building at the end of May, I felt the same pleasure Duchamp must have felt when workmen dropped and shattered Le Grand Verre.

In June, I got the only tattoo I would ever sport–from the legendary J.B. Jones, who decided to paint a picture of the Holy Spirit on my left shoulder. In August, my roommate and I decided to rent out a room in the old, rambling house we shared.

The ad we placed in the Daily Lobo was answered by a group of exchange students from Britain. They were young and brave and full of life. Two of them would end up living in the house and loudly introducing us to a thing called EDM.

The third was a long-haired wandering anthropologist from Wales. In the year that followed, she took me abroad. We traveled through Amazonia, basked on the beaches of lower Antilles, squatted in a shack in Middlesex and finally took a journey to the place where Nepal borders Tibet. In September 1996, we trekked up a river that followed a long, steep valley–into the kingdom of Mustang.

This was the place where lamas dwelt, walking amidst fields of buckwheat and dusty trails. They were in search of light, I remember thinking to myself as the straps from Ken’s old backpack dug into my shoulders and the mountains beckoned us.

V.25 No.35 | 09/01/2016

Event Horizon

Get Lit

Friday, Sep 9: Umbrella Week

Kickoff Umbrella Week with ten-minute performances by musicians, comedians, dancers and poets.

Event Horizon

Free Play

Friday, Sep 9: NM Game Jam

A 48 hour game development challenge uniting industry veterans, students and hobbyists to create new opportunities for game development growth in New Mexico.
Daye Jack got the music flowin'

music

You Could've Been Part of the Crowd

Watsky Shone at Sunshine

This past rainy weekend, Sunshine Theater was rocked by WATSKY, Witt Lowry, Daye Jack and Chuckwudi Hodge. If you missed out, here are a few snapshots to give you a taste of the energy that was bouncing off the walls and running through the crowd.

Also, this is a gem if you're all about that old sound.

V.25 No.34 | 08/25/2016

Event Horizon

Free Your Hands and Your Mind Will Follow

Monday, Sep 5: 2nd Annual Food-On-A-Stick Festival

The best foods trucks and bakers in Albuquerque serve up unique dishes all on-a-stick.

Event Horizon

Jazz 'n' Juice

Saturday, Sep 3: Wine and Jazz Festival

Meet local wine makers, sample their creations and purchase wines by the glass, bottle or case all while the brightest jazz bands and musicians take the stage.

Weekly Weather Report

Week of Aug. 30-Sep. 5

Clouds have been rolling through the metro area all day, so there's seemingly a chance of rain this afternoon. Yesterday it was the same situation but someone decided not to follow through with the rain so we all just had to watch it pass us by. Maybe someone will follow through with the signs that they give today. Tomorrow will be about the same, so we have that to look forward to. Things are going to start to heat up on Friday with a high of 86 degrees Fahrenheit, so don't throw your summer wardrobe in the trash compacter, yet (though advised by The City Fashion Council). Next week will be sunny with mild temps, almost like autumn really exists. But of course it does. We aren't all bodies floating in goo being prodded at by reptilian aliens.

Today's Events

Shift Dance Festival at VSA North 4th Art Center

Kelsey Paschich
Francois Achan

Unique choreographic voices, points of views and movement styles from dancers Allie Hankins, Jacqueline Stewart, Jacqueline M. García, Lisa Nevada and Kelsey Paschich.

Leftover Soul • vinyl dance party at Sister

Women's Self Defense Class at Shifting Sands Dojo

More Recommended Events ››
 

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    Hero Quest
    Hero Quest10.7.2016