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V.25 No.21 | 5/26/2016
Fawn
Kaelen Green

Culture Shock

Sailing to a New Arcadia

Kaelen Green's drawings offer passage to a different world

By Maggie Grimason
Five years have passed since a pivotal moment, and illustrations—each of which takes hundreds of hours to complete—are now seeing the light for the first time in An Island Emerging.
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V.25 No.20 | 5/19/2016
Sherman Alexie
Lee Towndrow

Culture Shock

“Books are the Only Provable Way to Improve Your Life”

Sherman Alexie visits our “literary city”

By Maggie Grimason
Maggie Grimason speaks with Sherman Alexie about anger, process and Janelle Monáe.
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V.25 No.19 | 5/12/2016
Free Leonard Peltier
Dirty Velvet

Culture Shock

Leonard Peltier’s Last Chance for Freedom

Gregg Deal's visual activism is indicative of the power of art

By Maggie Grimason
Gregg Deal questions the status quo with art that is simple, direct and impossible to ignore.
V.25 No.18 | 5/5/2016
Begin That Beguine
Max-Carlos Martinez

Culture Shock

More Than White Men on Horses

El Retrato Nuevomexicano Ahora explores the many contexts of portraiture

By Maggie Grimason
The people these 11 artists have chosen to represent in their work are vast and beautiful.
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Solastalgia
courtesy of the artist

Culture Shock

Solastalgia

: (n.) The pain experienced when the place where one resides or one loves is under immediate assault

By Maggie Grimason
Maggie Grimason interviews Demian DinéYazhi' and Jess X. Chen, two multi-disciplinary artists probing with their words the hurts of ongoing environmental degradation, colonization and the myriad injustices that thousands of people struggle against daily.
V.25 No.17 | 4/28/2016
You’re Never Weird on the Internet (almost)

Culture Shock

The Queen of the Geeks

Felicia Day embraces her weirdness, online and off

By Maggie Grimason
We interview the super-killable Sean Bean of sci-fi women, prior to her visit this Friday.
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Gallery Preview

The Merry Month of May

New galleries Downtown brighten the season

By Maggie Grimason
These new spaces may provide just the right experience to reinvigorate your creativity if the weather and wind aren’t cutting it.
V.25 No.15 | 4/14/2016
Pat Berrett

Culture Shock

Children of No Country

Yjastros develops its own language of dance

By Maggie Grimason
The marvelously robust art of flamenco is expressed in new choreographies presented in this weekend's 30th season of Yjastros.
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V.25 No.14 | 4/7/2016
Artbot
Illo by Rob M

BOB: Arts

By Megan Reneau & Courtney Foster

Best Performing Arts Group

The Best in theatre, visual arts and words both spoken and written.
V.25 No.13 | 3/31/2016
Keystone Light

Culture Shock

City's New Installation Opens Downtown

Street art, sound art, performance art are all found on Central

By Graggie Mimason
Graggie walks the blurry line between art and life. Cops let her go.

Gallery Preview

Art Appreciation 101

Varied gallery openings explore bird life, the human figure and more

By Maggie Grimason
Albuquerque's fine art galleries are exploring the confines and nuance of appreciation by showcasing thematic works that typify appreciation of a singular subject.
V.25 No.12 | 3/24/2016

Culture Shock

Black in Burque

Burque Noir celebrates black women, their art and activism

By Maggie Grimason
Burque Noir will feature a wealth of rich and varied performances by, and to pay homage to, black female artists and activists.
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V.25 No.9 | 03/03/2016
Myself as a Pilot by Anne Noggle

Arts

Assumed Identities: Photographs by Anne Noggle

Photographs by Anne Noggle

Press Release [ Wed Mar 23 2016 1:30 PM ]

Pilot, photographer, professor, and poet, Anne Noggle (1922-2005) began her groundbreaking career as a photographer late in life but quickly gained recognition for her witty and honest work.

Assumed Identities: Photographs by Anne Noggle opens at the New Mexico Museum of Art on Saturday, April 2, 2016 and runs through September 11, 2016. A free to the public opening is on Friday, April 1 from 5.30 to 7.30pm.

Drawn from the museum's extensive holdings of her work, Assumed Identities reintroduces the artist to the public ten years after her death. The show traces Noggle from her beginnings in photography in the late 1960s and early 1970s where we see her searching for subject matter in the early pieces – many taken in and around her home in Albuquerque. These photographs are the earliest inklings of the subject Noggle pursued most often in her career: herself and her world.

Noggle was influenced by Julia Margaret Cameron, Diane Arbus, and August Sander's revealing photographic portrayals of family and friends, the ordinary work-a-day prol, and even the obscure or freakish. When Noggle turned the camera on herself she became known for her unblinking self-portraits including those showing herself recovering from a facelift, nudes made when she was in her seventies, as well as portraits of elderly women that hint at their rich lives. Noggle's self-portraits present many guises to the camera – some real, some imaginary – and connect her firmly with both the feminist artists of the 1970s and to a long line of contemporary female photographic self-portraiture as seen in the work of Cindy Sherman, Gay Block, and others. "People tell me that the photographs of me are not in any way flattering," the artist told curator Anne Tucker in 1993. "They are not meant to be. They are supposed to be real."

Noggle's place in the world of photography is somewhat unheralded. One of her most significant contributions to the field of photographic history was the groundbreaking exhibition, Women of Photography: An Historical Survey, a show she co-curated in 1975 with San Francisco Bay Area photographer Margery Mann and an inspiration for young artists at the time. Noggle received a Guggenheim Fellowship, three NEA awards, and an honorary doctorate from the University of New Mexico. Additionally, she was the museum's first photography curator (1970 to 1976), and her work has been on view many times at the New Mexico Museum of Art; first in a 1968 photography competition and ten subsequent times in either group or survey shows.

Katherine Ware, both the exhibition curator and the museum's Curator of Photography noted that, "Noggle was important in the development of photography in New Mexico. With more than 100 pieces of her work in the museum's collection, her contributions as an artist have yet to be fully appreciated or evaluated. Assumed Identities is an attempt to examine her work in depth on the 10th anniversary of her death."

About Anne Noggle

Born in Illinois, Noggle earned a pilot's license by her senior year in high school, at a time when very few women were pilots. Working as a flight instructor, she served as a Women's Air Force Service Pilot (WASP) during World War II. Following the war, she taught flying, did stunts for an aerial circus, and did crop-dusting throughout the Southwest. She then went on active duty with the Air Force and served overseas. Working in Paris for a time, her visits to the Louvre sparked her interest in art. From her crop-dusting work Noggle developed emphysema forcing her retirement from flying. She then moved to Albuquerque and at the age of thirty-eight enrolled as a freshman in art history at the University of New Mexico. Taking a studio art requirement, she developed photographs for the first time and felt the same kind of excitement she had experienced as a pilot, saying, "There is a resemblance, I think, between flying and photography. Both are done alone, in concept anyway, and both require independence and optimism, and some dumb courage." She went on to earn a Bachelor in Fine Arts degree in Art and Art History in 1966; she subsequently continued graduate studies in photography from 1966 until she earned a master's degree in 1970. Her emphasis on portraiture was distinctly at odds with the focus of the art department at that time as shaped by Van Deren Coke but Noggle stood by her vision.

V.25 No.11 | 3/17/2016
Corpus Info Shop
Steven Serrano

Culture Shock

A Queer, Radical Convergence

Corpus Info Shop opens the doors of its alternative library and DIY space

By Maggie Grimason
Corpus Info Shop is a community-based, alternative media center that offers books, art, zines, film and music that you won't be able to find at the traditional library a few blocks away.
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V.25 No.9 | 03/03/2016

Arts

Artist Talk: Jonathan Thunder

and community lunch!

Press Release [ Fri Mar 11 2016 1:00 PM ]

Join the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts and the IAIA Artist-in- Residence (A-i-R) Jonathan Thunder (Red Lake Ojibwe) as he discusses his residency and art practice on March 16, at noon. Jonathan Thunder (Red Lake Ojibwe) is a painter and digital media artist currently residing in Duluth, Minnesota. He attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and received a BFA in Visual Effects and Motion Graphics from the Art Institutes International Minnesota. The event will take place on the second floor project lab, and a community lunch will follow!

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