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V.23 No.36 |

Opinion

County Commission Offers Alternative to Berry's Tender Mercies

By Samantha Anne Carrillo [ Sat Sep 6 2014 7:35 PM ]

On Friday, Aug. 29, Mayor Richard J. Berry made history. In his YouTube communiqué debut, Berry became the first Albuquerque mayor to veto an election amendment. According to Berry's statement, R-14-91 contained proposals he couldn't "in good conscience" allow Albuquerque citizens to vote on. Translation: Berry claims his ethics prevented him from permitting us to weigh in at the polls on a) raising sales tax one-eighth of a centto fund social services for the addicted, homeless and mentally illand b) to reduce criminal penalties for the possession of less than one ounce of marijuana.

R-14-91 also contained ballot initiatives to a) grant the City Council approval authority over the Mayor's hiring of police and fire chiefs, b) change the voter-initiative process to prevent costly special elections and c) a bond proposal to fund "metropolitan redevelopment." In layman's terms, Berry's veto was a political strong-arm tactic to get the City Council to drop the tax increase and penalty reduction initiatives. Otherwise, these other three issues wouldn't get to voters. And it worked. On Wednesday, Sept. 3, the Council compromised (read: caved).

And that, as they say, could have been that. But on Friday, Sept. 5, the Bernalillo County Commission issued a press release calling for voter input on the tax increase and marijuana penalty reduction initiatives that Berry nixed. In the release Commission Chair Debbie O’Malley said, “It’s critical that we hear directly from the people about how to move forward on these two issues that have such a major impact on our community. We need to look for ways to divert people with serious mental illness out of jail and into treatment instead. This issue impacts all of us and Bernalillo County residents are ready to talk about solutions.”

In the same release, Commissioner Maggie Hart-Stebbins states, “Better access to mental health services and marijuana penalties are clearly on the minds of Bernalillo County residents. Both of these issues have a significant impact on public safety and county government so it makes sense to give the voters a say in this community discussion.”

The County Commission will convene on Monday, Sept. 8, at 10am to make a final decision on which questions voters will get to address. That's where you come in. O'Malley and Hart-Stebbins want your input on the tax and marijuana penalty initiatives. Based on the overwhelmingly critical responses to Berry's veto video and the veto post on his Facebook page, many of you have something to say. So say it. If the Commission adds these initiatives to the ballot, all Bernalillo County residentsnot just city folkwill have an opportunity to make a meaningful difference in creating local public policy.

These are difficult times for our city, and we appear to be at a crossroads. It's easy to be cynical. But rather than reposting memesespecially those featuring Mark Twain's belief that voting makes no differencetake a few minutes this weekend to engage your representatives on issues that matter to you. To facilitate that conversation, scroll on for quick links to contact O'Malley and Hart Stebbins. Use your voice. It's more powerful than you know.

Click here to email Debbie O'Malley or call her at (505) 468-7027.

Click here to email Maggie Hart-Stebbins or call her at (505) 468-7108.

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V.23 No.35 |

Opinion

The Revolution Will Not Be Posted On YouTube

Berry's historic veto endangers Albuquerque's future

By Samantha Anne Carrillo [ Sat Aug 30 2014 3:12 PM ]

Albuquerque Mayor Richard J. Berry made history yesterday. In addition to debuting a YouTube communiqué strategy, Berry became the first mayor in Albuquerque's history to veto an election amendment. According to the announcement, Berry vetoed R-14-91 because he couldn't "in good conscience" allow citizens of Albuquerque the opportunity to vote on a) lessening criminal penalties for possession of marijuana in quantities of one ounce or less and b) raising the Albuquerque gross-receipts tax rate one-eighth of a cent to fund social services for addicted, mentally ill and homeless citizens.

In this historic address, Berry cites his unwillingness to sign a bill that would raise taxes without any "clear and concise plan" on how to spend resulting funds and "flying in the face of state and federal law" by decriminalizing the possession of an "illegal drug." And the big, bad "illegal drug" is ... marijuana, a drug so innocuous even notoriously conservative local media outlets refer to it by slang terms like "pot" or "weed."

Deferring a vote on lessening penalties for possession of marijuanawhich is a far cry from actually decriminalizing marijuanais rather short-sighted, but the greater injustice in this veto is stalling funding for a citywide crisis of addiction, mental illness and homelessness. These three issueswhich overlap and are at the root of immense suffering, both for those grappling with these afflictions and those impacted by resulting crimemust be at the core of any "urban renewal" strategy.

The City Council can override Berry's veto with a vote of 6 to 3. Three other ballot initiativesgranting the City Council approval authority over the Mayor's hiring of police and fire chiefs, changing the voter-initiative process to prevent costly special elections and a bond proposal that would fund "metropolitan redevelopment"are also included in Berry's veto. Within the scope of these combined, largely progressive initiatives, consider the urgency of funding social services for our city's homeless, mentally ill and addicted residents when communicating with your City Councilor. If you're not sure who that is, find out here.

For my money, raising sales tax one-eighth of a cent, from 7 percent to 7.125 percent, is a prudent investment in the future of Albuquerque. And if lessening criminal penalties for possession of marijuana allows Albuquerque law enforcement to focus on addressing the institutional failures clearly outlined by the US Department of Justice and preventing violent crime, so much the better. Whatever your opinion of the ballot initiatives proposed in R-14-91, let your City Councilor know what you think. This is an issue that deserves your attention and civic engagement ... even on Labor Day weekend.

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V.22 No.18 |

news

The Daily Word in the incredible story of the Cleveland hostages, pink dolphins and hairy visors

By Geoffrey Plant [ Tue May 7 2013 8:19 AM ]
The Daily Word

Reported cases of HIV infection are on the increase on the Navajo Reservation.

Colorado pot legalization involves some new taxes that may not have the support of pro-marijuana groups.

KOAT reports a rash of bike thefts downtown.

Are some of our contemporary English words identical to words from a 15,000 year old "proto-Eurasiatic" Ice Age language?

Kidnapped in Cleveland, hostages for ten years and an instant-classic TV interview.

The United States finally came out and accused China of cyber-espionage.

The pink dolphins of Hong Kong are dying.

I bet Bill Richardson could get Led Zeppelin back together.

The ABBA museum in Stockholm is now open!

This article explains the origins the conservative Islamist movement in Bangladesh.

There's only enough room in this world for one manufacturer of "visors with simulated hair," AKA hairy-hats.

On this day in 1980, Yugoslavian dictator Josip Tito was buried.

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V.20 No.21 | 5/26/2011
Courtesy of the City of Albuquerque

News Bite

Burque’s Game Plan

By Carolyn Carlson
Rather than spending Chavez-style on one or two big-ticket items, why not spread that money into myriad projects that connect in an integrated way? That's the idea behind Berry's "ABQ the Plan.”
V.20 No.2 | 1/13/2011

News Bite

First, a Roof

By Marisa Demarco

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V.19 No.45 | 11/11/2010

news

Berry talks Burque, recycling and the arena

By Sam Adams [ Fri Nov 5 2010 3:09 PM ]

About three quarters of the way through Thursday's State of the City address, Mayor Richard Berry laid out his intentions for the proposed arena project. "I simply have not gotten to the point where I can look the taxpayers of Albuquerque in the eye and tell them that now is the right time to spend $300 million on a Downtown event center and headquarter hotel," Berry said. He went on to refer to the convention center market as "an industry ... in decline," and said that he was not willing to increase taxes to make it happen.

But Berry stopped short of ruling the possibility out. He mentioned the use of city-owned property and a renovation of the existing convention center as potential solves. "We can talk about incentivizing the private sector to finance a headquarters hotel," he added.

The mayor also addressed privatizing city recycling, to some degree. He began with the bold, sweeping promise that, "The way we recycle will forever be changed in Albuquerque by this time next year." He said it's unacceptable for the city to recycle only 6 percent of its total waste. He proposed a "public-private partnership" that would create a regional processing plant but didn't get any more specific.

Much of the speech was dedicated to addressing how Berry and his staff had achieved transparency and financial efficiency in hard times. He said they saved $25 million in 2010 largely by "trimming the fat," or cutting back in unnecessary administrative positions. All this was done while receiving an A+ review from the Sunshine Review, a national transparency rating company.

Other notable figures Berry mentioned for the last year include a 19 percent decrease in property crime, $10 million toward affordable housing, a record 11 million bus riders on public transit and 25 percent fewer cats euthanized by city shelters.

Planned projects for the next year include expanded bus routes in busy areas, building two fire stations, solar energy use at the airport and an east side spay-neuter clinic.

The mayor ended his speech in the same spirit of resiliency and collaboration he purveyed throughout: "We have weathered some tough roads this past year, and need to be vigilant as we move forward—but together we can look toward a bright future."

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V.19 No.32 | 8/12/2010

news

The government wants you to tell it how to save money. No really.

By Marisa Demarco [ Mon Aug 9 2010 10:54 AM ]

How many times have you said, “I can’t believe the city wastes money on ... “? Or “I can’t believe they spent taxpayer dollars on [blank] while [blank] goes to the dogs”?

Today, Mayor Richard Berry will announce his latest effort to save the city some cash. Through an online form, you can report abuse, fraud and waste. You can also offer tips on how you think the city can spend our dough more wisely.

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V.19 No.31 | 8/5/2010

Council Watch

Mind on Its Money, Money on Its Mind

By Carolyn Carlson
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V.19 No.30 | 7/29/2010

Newscity

Wrong Side of the Law

Will the city’s agreement with ICE impact immigrant victims of domestic violence?

By Marisa Demarco

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V.19 No.29 | 7/22/2010

Gessing Again

The Downtown “Arena”

Berry should know better

By Paul Gessing

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V.18 No.50 | 12/10/2009

Council Watch

The New Boss

By Carolyn Carlson

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V.18 No.43 | 10/22/2009

Ortiz y Pino

We Were Mugged!

Why Richard Berry won the mayor’s seat

By Jerry Ortiz y Pino

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V.18 No.37 |

politics

Tonight! A Mayoral Debate!

By Marisa Demarco [ Wed Sep 16 2009 12:33 PM ]

The questions will be good. Yesterday, we gathered round a conference room table—we members of independent and public media—and put our collective brainpower into thinking about the city, its direction and its citizens. This won't be politics as usual.

You can show up to make sure that it isn't. I'll be collecting questions from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Bank of America Theatre at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. I'll pick a couple of the best ones and pose them to the candidates during the broadcast.

If you can't make it down in person, listen tonight at 7 p.m. to KUNM 89.9. Or you can catch it Friday at 7 p.m. on KNME Channel 5.

Even better, see a live-stream of the event here at alibi.com and live-blog with us. (You should also be able to catch it and join the fray from any of the media partners' sites).

Don't forget about the debate afterparty at Blackbird Buvette (509 Central). Down a Civic Duty (seriously, that's our drink special), listen to some jams by Jessica Cassyle Carr and friends, and discuss the city.

ALL OF THIS IS FREE.

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