Book Reviews


V.26 No.23 | 6/8/2017

Book Review

Memory Rendered into Poetry

Jacqueline Woodson's visit and her novel, Another Brooklyn

In Another Brooklyn, two-parts poetry and one-part prose, it's not just the story that resonates, but the knack that Jacqueline Woodson has for infusing the world she creates with the contemplativeness that comes with her earnest poetry.
V.26 No.19 | 5/11/2017
Sunshine State

Book Review

All Roads Lead to Florida

Sarah Gerard's dark evocations of the sunshine state

Sarah Gerard's book of essays, Sunshine State, is an ode to the many faces of her home state, with a the dizzying toggle between internal landscapes and external forces, shifting between the poetic and the starkly unsentimental.
V.26 No.14 | 4/6/2017
Universal Harvester

Book Review

Midwestern Horror Mise en Scène

Universal Harvester falls short of its promise

Universal Harvester

Universal Harvester, despite its amazing jacket design and intriguing concepts, fails to ever pull the reader in fully.

V.26 No.6 | 2/9/2017

Book Review

Who Comes for the Girls

Zadie Smith's inquiry into race, belonging and privilege

Swing Time

A reader could easily pick up this novel and enjoy it without putting any thought to the underpinnings of all the drama; just as likely, what underpins each scene might be what others find most compelling and important.
V.25 No.52 | 12/29/2016
Pond

Book Review

The Magic of Solitude

Pond stands apart from literary convention

Claire-Louise Bennett's auspicious debut, Pond, distinguishes itself from other books published this year in every way—from subject to structure to tone, all the way down to the story's values.
V.25 No.45 | 11/10/2016
The Gloaming

Book Review

The Specter of Consequences

The Gloaming traces grief across continents

The Gloaming, by Melanie Finn, traces grief across continents.
V.25 No.37 | 9/15/2016
The Last Samurai

Book Review

The Last Samurai in London

No, it doesn’t have anything to do with that awful Tom Cruise movie

The Last Samurai

The Last Samurai is a brilliant work that turns a classic story on its head.
V.25 No.20 | 5/19/2016
Zero K

Book Review

DeLillo’s Try for Immortality

Zero K extends career-long queries

Despite the unnecessary opaqueness of Zero K, it is a testament to DeLillo’s literary intellect and one-of-a-kind style.
V.25 No.2 | 1/14/2016
Unbecoming: A Novel

Book Review

Steal Life of Bad Fruit

Unbecoming: A Novel

In the immortal worlds of Buckaroo Banzai, “No matter where you go, there you are.”
V.24 No.23 | 6/4/2015
Your Band Sucks

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Your Band Sucks

The rise and fall of indie music

Your Band Sucks: What I Saw at Indie Rock's Failed Revolution (But Can No Longer Hear)

Jon Fine’s commentary is mostly just a memoir.
V.24 No.21 | 5/21/2015

Books

Where Is Edward Abbey?

The search for an environmental hero's final resting place

Author Sean Prentiss discusses his haunting new memoir about searching for the secret grave of Edward Abbey.
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V.24 No.20 | 5/14/2015
Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics

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Far Out and Inward-Looking

Santa Fe publisher Synergetic Press rereleases Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics with an intriguing talk at Collected Works Bookstore.
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The Marble Orchard

Book Review

The Ties That Bind

The Marble Orchard

Dark literary thriller The Marble Orchard explores how loyalties can shape a man’s choices—and doom him.
V.24 No.19 | 5/7/2015

Book Review

Just Say No to Prohibition

Johann Hari challenges a devastating 100-year experiment

Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs

We’ve lost the War on Drugs. So what’s next?
V.24 No.18 | 4/30/2015

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Conquering America One Beat at a Time

August March pauses “The Mighty Boosh” long enough to read and review Michaelangelo Matos’ EDM treatise The Underground Is Massive: How Electronic Dance Music Conquered America.