california


V.23 No.25 | 6/19/2014

Odds & Ends

By Devin D. O’Leary
From Ukraine to Alabama, it’s funny because it happened to someone else.

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The Daily Word in hungry gators, a stegomastodon skull and a POW's return

Colleges look at fraternities to ease the pressure.

Secretary of State John Kerry sent a message to Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, urging Iraqis to “come together,” as Al Qaeda-inspired militants continue their march toward Baghdad.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, an American prisoner of war, has been returned to the states.

A priest was shot and killed at a church in Phoenix, Ariz., while another was wounded.

Bobby Lee Pearson, who was on trial for a burglary charge, died in a fight mere hours after being acquitted.

You don't want your gun? Take it to the landfill!

Two Chinese nationals were apprehended and face federal charges for trying to buy military sensors from an Albuquerque company and smuggle them back to China.

Doctors at UNM Hospital are trying to reconstruct an 8-month-old child's organs after she was allegedly raped by her mother's boyfriend.

It's a stegomastodon skull!

A Louisiana tour guide likes to swim with gators … and feed them … with his mouth.

news

The Daily Word in Mark Zuckerberg's complaints, a WIPP truck and a dog-eating python

High schools are just now catching on that a later start time means healthier students. Did you think beauty rest was a myth?

Authorities now think the Malaysian plane that's been missing for almost a week was “deliberately flown off-course.”

The NSA has made Mark Zuckerberg so mad that he called the President to complain.

Police in California arrested a teen father for allegedly biting the nose off his 1-month-old son because he wouldn't stop crying.

It's looking like fewer planes are gonna land in Albuquerque.

Renatta Torres, mother of Christopher Torres (who was fatally shot by APD almost three years ago), took to the stand to talk about her son.

Anthony Samora, 46, is getting life in prison, plus 27 years, for raping and murdering a 16-year-old boy. This was his second conviction for rape.

According to a report released today, a truck that caught fire at WIPP was “improperly maintained.”

I guess this just adds to the many reasons I don't like snakes.

news

The Daily Word in Detroit's bankruptcy, racism at Ole Miss and a Twix obsession

President Obama is meeting with the Dalai Lama today. And China ain't happy about it.

A court will hear several groups' petitions for appeal regarding Detroit's eligibility to file for bankruptcy protection.

Someone wants to split Cali into six parts...

Racism is still brewing at Ole Miss.

A murder suspect was found living and working in an Albuquerque motel. Do I hear discount?

A stabbing in northwest Albuquerque sent three people to the hospital, and police think they have all the suspects in custody.

Brandon Villalobos' lawyer says that his lack of mental capacity could be a key component in his defense. Villalobos is accused of killing 12-year-old Alex Madrid.

Now, I love a good Twix. But this is dedication.

news

The Daily Word in Dayton's immigrants, the mayoral election and randy tarantulas

While the government shutdown still looms, Congress is questioning whether the debt ceiling will be increased and ponders the likelihood of a default.

Al Qaeda fugitive Abu Anas al-Libi was captured in Libya over the weekend and is being held on the U.S.S. San Antonio in the Mediterranean Sea before being taken to New York to be prosecuted.

“World's first flexible OLED [organic light-emitting diode] panel for smartphones"? LG corners the market on curved screens and such.

Dayton, Ohio sees improvements in its economy by lending help to people immigrating to the US.

After an anti-abortion group was accused of picketing a doctor's house in Bernalillo County, the county commissioners are looking into an anti-picketing ordinance to prevent this from happening again.

Jerry Chavez is accused of stabbing his estranged wife to death while his two boys, ages 6 and 12, witnessed the crime. Though his friends have stated that he is a good, Christian man and “would never kill anyone.”

With the mayoral election happening tomorrow, the question remains: Will there be a runoff?

Who knew tarantulas really like to get it on?

news

The Daily Word in hot schools in the Midwest, California's Rim Fire and lava lamps

Congress and the White House are still trying to decide whether or not to launch a limited military strike against Syria for using chemical weapons on civilians last month.

One-year-old Antiq Hennis was shot in the head and killed Sunday night in Brooklyn, NY. According to sources, the bullet was meant for this father, Anthony Hennis.

For those who are taking a break this Labor Day and reading Fifty Shades of Grey, the two main stars of the movie adaptation were announced.

California's Rim Fire is still raging, and many fear for the lives of the cattle that graze those lands.

It's getting hot in here, so can I please go home?

The search still continues for missing firefighter, Token Adams, who went missing on Friday afternoon when he failed to report to his crew at a “pre-planned meeting point” when responding to a fire in the Jemez.

Five people (including two children and a pregnant woman) died this Labor Day weekend in car crashes around the state.

Hey Londoners, go get you some lava lamps. They turn 50 tomorrow!

news

The Daily Word in biker wars, flash flood warnings, a massive prison hunger strike and speculation about Edward Snowden

The tone of this local KRQE piece about an influx of rival biker gangs reminds one of an old biker film.

I do not own a lawn but I still want a free rain gauge.

There was more flooding in the Albuquerque area last night.

My iPhone sent me a warning about flash floods for the first time in my life last night. The government knows exactly where I am.

Urban chicken farming sounds great but apparently is starting to result in skyrocketing chicken-abandonment.

A massive hunger strike protesting prisons' isolation policies began yesterday in California.

Edward Snowden might be going to Venezuala according to a Russian politician. And who the hell is Snowden, really?

This U.S. federal court decision in favor of the EFF is an important result of the documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

At the Transportation Safety Board of Canada site you can check out ALL the recent Canadian train wrecks (and other disasters) including updates on the one in Lac-Megantic, Quebec.

Osama Bin Laden owned a cowboy hat which he wore to prevent drones from spotting him.

news

The Daily Word in Snowden's "disappearance," Syrian rebels and the Zimmerman trial

Whooping cough claimed 10 children. Could lack of vaccines be a factor?

Where did Edward Snowden go?

The Zimmerman trial for the murder of Trayvon Martin starts today ...

Will the U.S. back Syrian rebels?

The Levi Chavez murder trial starts today as well ...

Ahem ... sir! That golf cart is not free!

New Mexico democrats rally to save federal special ed funding.

Officials say Thompson Ridge fire is 40 percent contained, while Kingston, N.M. has been issued a formal evacuation due to a fire in the Gila National Forest.

Val Midwest is on a photo spree!

news

The Daily Word in Israel, miracle Lobos, Nativity spats

Israel is prepared to send troops into Gaza, but would still prefer a diplomatic solution.

Alford’s Lobos snag a miracle 70-69 win over George Mason, head to the Pacific Jam tournament final against #23 UConn.

Fight over Nativity displays in California heading to court.

Twinkies will survive!

Some animals were in fact harmed in the making of The Hobbit.

Two APD officers under investigation for sexual misconduct.

Curiosity rover suggests that astronauts might be able to survive on Mars.

Bill Nye and Shia LeBeouf: A glorious combination.

Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez appear to be back together.

Nob Hill business owners will meet tonight to duke it out over food trucks.

The juice train.

Apparently the KC Chiefs killed a guy.

Gas prices drop in New Mexico, AAA shows state at below the national average (finally something we WANT to be below average!).

Hubble may have photographed its farthest galaxy yet.

If you are going to counterfeit bills, at least use the right president.

Ah, action figures.

Flashback

One of the Alibi’s earliest editors remembers the olden days.

Lauri Sagle is an instructor of English at the University of Hawai’i and the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence. She is a core contributor to the English department and an integral member of the women’s studies department. She left the Alibi on December 28, 1994.http://www.hawaii.edu/about/awards/hilo.php?award=sagle
Lauri Sagle is an instructor of English at the University of Hawai’i and the recipient of the Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence. She is a core contributor to the English department and an integral member of the women’s studies department. She left the Alibi on December 28, 1994.

http://www.hawaii.edu/about/awards/hilo.php?award=sagle

The early days of The Alibi, then known as NuCity (before a Chicago publication with a phonetically identical name threatened to rip out all of our editorial teeth), were the types of days that every flash-of-genius writer chortles over when he's being interviewed by Oprah about his sizzling debut novel, or every tech guru recalls as she laughingly characterizes her time spent paying her dues before the Big Brilliant Idea that Changed Technology ForEver. They were days of subsisting on Fred's bagels (since we mostly got paid in "bagel bucks" instead of cash); working (sometimes even crashing) in a hot office box with Department of Health condemnable carpet; and simply assuming, with the nearly impervious certainty of youth, that everything would get better, and that we'd have fun in the meantime.

But since I was a bit older (a UNM grad student) than the whippersnappers (freshly minted University of Wisconsin alumni who'd graduated at age 14 after starting the now-famous Onion and who then bounded over to Albuquerque to launch NuCity), maybe my perviousness was perviouser because a couple of symbolic events shook my sense of admittedly weak professionalism.

One came in the form of the "serious" debut of our politics issue. We'd worked hard on the format and content: local pols running for office had been profiled; corresponding election season events had been catalogued; illustrations had been applied to cleverly embellish the stories. I, as the Managing Editor/Editor, along with our Copy Editor at the time, had the last look through before giving the final approval. Perfect! So proud! So political! So grown up! Too bad about the blaring, mega-point headline that spelled the word "candidate" wrong, as we saw the next day before the issue inexorably hit the stands–a classic minor-major detail. The other folks at the paper who were psychologically healthier than I was just laughed it off, smoked a cigarette, and began laying out the next issue.

The second event actually came before the first one chronologically, but it had bigger ramifications at the time. We were applying for membership in AAN, the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, and a group of us (Chris Johnson, Dan Scott, Landry? Dabney? O'Leary? Jonesy? Petersen?) had flown over to California with our precious offering–an issue that featured a solid, well-researched story by the inimitable Tim McGivern, illustrated by the swashbuckling Jason Waskey. We actually had to appear before a panel of AAN judges in an American Idol meets the North Korean Ministry of People's Security moment. And we were eviscerated. Bomblets like "juvenile" and "unprofessional" and "unworthy" were tossed about casually by people who were supposed to be cool! They had the word "alternative" in their dang title! Where was the encouragement, the pub invitation, the tender promise of mentorship? AAN was important since, through membership, we could use their big stories in our paper and they could pick up and circulate ours as well. It was the only time, to date, that a professional setback made me cry. One journalist in the judging group did attempt to defend us and spoke to us afterward as well. He was the lone African American on the panel and commended the diversity of our coverage. Chris and Dan lobbed a few choice expletives, laughed, said we'd be fine, and smoked some cigarettes.

They were right. We eventually did make it into AAN, now operating under the expanded 21st identity of Association of Alternative Newsmedia. "Canidates," both in title and in practice, are long forgotten. (Although we did once have an interesting conversation with at-the-time New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, which presaged his perpetual libertarian presence on the national ticket ... but that's another story.) So while most of us, past and present, may not be Oprah dazzlers or tech zillionistas, we probably have better carpet now, and the Alibi still laughs, spits out an expletive here and there, maybe smokes a cigarette when the spouse isn't looking, and publishes onward.

V.20 No.10 | 3/10/2011
Mike Watt

Feature

Punk Is Whatever We Made It to Be

An interview with bassist Mike Watt

By Marisa Demarco

Mike Watt's latest album, Hyphenated-Man, is not about the past. "It's kind of a meditation on me in middle age," he says.

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Californians just say no to marijuana legalization

It's official. Prop 19 failed. But supporters promise they'll be back in 2012.

V.19 No.38 | 9/23/2010

Talking Points

A Soldier in the Drug War Switches Sides

By Marisa Demarco

Conservative Judge James Gray was on the bench for 25 years in Orange County. He was a federal prosecutor and a Navy JAG before that. He ran for Congress as a Republican in the late ’90s and as a Libertarian for Senate a few years later.

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The Daily Word 6.1.10: New Mexico Primary, Stylish Werewolves, The Other Fergie

Get out there and vote in today’s primary!

Tropical Storm Agatha makes a giant hole in Guatemala City.

A woman who was hit by a car sues Google for faulty Google Map directions.

Kids are wearing yellow contact lenses and fangs in schools these days.

A new poll finds 46 percent of Americans suffer from debt stress.

Sarah Ferguson, videotaped in a hotel attempting to sell access to her ex Prince Andrew, tells Oprah she was just drinking.

The U.S. military withdraws from earthquake-ravaged Haiti today.

24 miles of Louisiana coastline has been fouled due to the Gulf oil spill.

A man shoots an employee and then himself at a North Carolina Target store.

California is split in half when it comes to Arizona’s SB 1070.

PNM wants a 21 percent rate hike on your electric bill.

Worker bees swarm Wall Street on Memorial Day. Are they trying to tell us something?

Moriarty may be the future site of a memorial for DWI victims.

blog

February 4th

211– Roman Emperor Septimius Severus dies, leaving the Roman Empire in the hands of his two quarrelsome sons, Biggus Dickus and Naughtius Maximus.

1703 – In Edo (Tokyo), 46 of the Forty-seven Ronin commit seppuku (ritual suicide) as recompense for avenging their master's death.

LOL u r doin it rong.

1789 – George Washington is unanimously elected as the first President of the United States by the U.S. Electoral College.

1936 – Radium becomes the first radioactive element to be made synthetically.

not the roller derby team. Is there one called radium girls?

1974 – The Symbionese Liberation Army kidnaps Patty Hearst in Berkeley, California. Looks smashing in a beret.

1983 - Singer Karen Carpenter died at her parent’s home in Los Angeles of heart failure caused by chronic anorexia nervosa, she was 32.

For Nick

1987 – Liberace went to the big piano in the sky at the age of 67, due to complications from AIDS.

2004 - Mark Zuckerberg launched "Thefacebook"

Nonmobile version