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V.23 No.34 | 8/21/2014
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Crib Notes

Crib Notes: Aug. 21, 2014

By August March
Test your knowledge of last week’s acronym-heavy New Mexico news—from CDC to DEA to APD to UNM—with the Alibi pop quiz.
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V.23 No.2 |

news

The Daily Word in assisted suicide, an APD shooting settlement and Third Reich space aliens are running the United States

By Geoffrey Plant [ Tue Jan 14 2014 8:01 AM ]
The Daily Word

The third season of "Longmire" will commence shooting this spring in and around Santa Fe.

"Human Waste Disposal" APD cop Economidy cost the city about $300,000 by justifiably shooting a man three times in the back.

A New Mexico District Judge's decision paves the way for changes to the state's assisted suicide law.

Farmington has Blue Meth. It's real, but of low quality apparently.

An Iranian news agency is reporting that a new Snowden leak proves that since 1945 the US has been run by the same space aliens that comprised the Third Reich.

Here are some laughably misogynistic ads of yore.

Meet the "Swiss Cheese Pervert."

There was an argument over texting in a theater that ended in a fatal shooting.

Vice Magazine headlines are inherently fake-sounding.

Not "doing all right" in South Korea.

Ford is going to start making aluminum trucks.

-Look! A woolly pig.

Swamp pizza.

Another Juggalo lawsuit against the FBI. And DOJ.

It appears that the DEA has been backhandedly assisting the importation of muchas drogas into the US.

Kanye West punched a guy in Kim Kardashian's chiropractor's office.

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V.21 No.20 |

news

The Daily Word in Phonehenge, another birther politician, the El Rancho Murders and the solar eclipse.

By Geoffrey Plant [ Sun May 20 2012 9:14 AM ]
The Daily Word

New Mexico Department of Tourism just paid 180,000 dollars to have their website redesigned. An out of state company was hired to do it.

Solar Eclipse this evening!

Update on the El Rancho murders case.

The saddest aquarium in America.

Unbelievably bad music video paean to Facebook, "Thank You Facebook."

The DEA wants to scan every single license plate on cars traveling on Utah's Interstate 15.

Arizona Secretary of State is not sure the President is a citizen and wants proof before putting Obama on the ballot.

Jackie Chan is retiring from action films and beginning his DeNiro phase.

Audio-book version of the erotic novel Fifty Shades of Grey, narrated by Gilbert Gottfried.

The New York Times takes a look at Mitt Romney's religious beliefs.

The Harry Potter franchise has joined the ranks of Finding Nemo, Babe, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and other films that inspired people to buy pets they couldn't take care of and didn't really want.

1970's ads for mens jumpsuits.

Phonehenge West is no more. Garbage visionary Kim Fahey was fined and placed on probation -which includes five days community service at the coroner's office....

On this day in 1944, Joe Cocker was born.

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V.21 No.19 | 5/10/2012

news

The Daily Word in Kutcher, Munch and Love

By Marisa Demarco [ Thu May 3 2012 10:41 AM ]
The Daily Word

Ex. Gov. Gary Johnson likely to get the Libertarian nod for prez.

Santa Fe carnival gave out live rabbits and turtles as prizes.

College student says DEA forgot him in a holding cell for days.

Credit is America’s welfare plan, says professor.

In a move that can only devalue the old-fashioned paper tome, publishers are planning to put ads on book covers.

Ashton Kutcher’s brownface Popchips ad pulled.

Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” sold for $120 million, making it the most expensive painting in the world.

Courtney Love’s art.

Lost parakeet tells police where he lives.

Most of us are outliers.

Who riots best? Sports fans or protesters?

How superstitions and rituals help you win.

Hello Kitty airline.

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V.20 No.26 | 6/30/2011

news

Ron Paul pushes first bill ever that would lift U.S. marijuana ban

By Elise Kaplan, fearless intern [ Fri Jun 24 2011 2:13 PM ]

Forty years after Richard Nixon declared war on drugs, 16 states, including New Mexico, have approved the use of medical marijuana.

If Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and presidential hopeful Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) get their way, the federal ban on marijuana would cease entirely.

The bipartisan legislation introduced yesterday calls for state control of marijuana production and possession—independent of the federal government. That means states could continue to prohibit marijuana or could choose to legalize it. This is the first bill introduced to Congress that would end federal marijuana prohibition.

This comes as good news to Erik Briones, president and founder of Minerva Canna Group, a marijuana provider in Rio Rancho.

“The war on drugs is basically a failure,” he says in a phone interview, as a hash-making device whirs away in the background. “If you look at the stats, we have the highest rate of teens trying drugs, and more and more coming across the border. The government spends trillions of dollars, and they're losing the war.”

A symptom of the criminalization of marijuana, Briones says, is the overcrowding of prisons across the country.

“If you take out everyone in jail for marijuana-related charges, the prison population would be cut in half,” he says.

Thirteen states have decriminalized the use of non-medical marijuana, treating small-quantity possession like a minor traffic violation. Interestingly, New Mexico is not on that short list, though we've legalized medical cannabis.

More states are moving toward decriminalization, Briones says, but the Drug Enforcement Administration continues to bust licensed producers in Colorado, Montana and California.

“For the DEA, it's all very black and white,” he says. “We're all a bunch of scumbag criminals”

The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act of New Mexico allows registered users to possess and use marijuana without facing arrest, prosecution or penalty. The law—protecting patients, primary caregivers, licensed producers and practitioners—passed in 2007.

Other states look to New Mexico when formulating their medical cannabis policy, Briones says, due to the tightness of the regulations.

Twenty-five licensed providers operate in New Mexico, with the majority in Albuquerque. Providers can grow up to 150 plants at a time.

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V.20 No.22 | 6/2/2011
Illustration by Brapola!

News Feature

The Heroin Surge

As addiction climbs in Albuquerque, cartels are ready to deliver

By Joe Kolb
In 2008, the number of heroin-overdose deaths jumped—and the age of users dropped, according to the New Mexico Department of Health. "We know there is a significant increase in heroin sales in Albuquerque, but we just don't know how much is out there," says Capt. Matt Thomas of the Criminal Investigation Division in the Bernalillo Sheriff's Office. "We tend to see different trends in drug prevalence, where it went from cocaine to meth and now to heroin."
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