drought


Press Release

Monitoring the Drought

It’s dry, dry, dry

Things are heating up around the state, folks, and not in a good way. Significant portions of the Land of Enchantment are currently suffering under extra-dry conditions, and almost a quarter of the state is dealing with extreme drought.

A press release from the Office of the State Engineer says:

This chart depicts an analysis of drought severity in New Mexico. The U.S. Drought Monitor is produced in partnership between the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The maps, which are based on analysis of the data, are released each Thursday at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Time.”

For more information visit the New Mexico Governor’s Drought Task Force website.

weather

Forget the Groundhog: Harvester Ants Say Spring is Here

Important weather info: Not only were termites swarming early, but ticks are out in full force and that’s about a month too early. More importantly, harvester ants are coming out; they would never come out if the ground were going to freeze again. Spring is here to stay, and summer is around the corner.

Because of the drought, many insects will be trying to get inside your home. Many more will be coming out of the desert looking for water—there isn’t any out there.

Surprisingly, there was a mosquito under my outside light last night. I could tell by the way it was standing that it was an Aedes mosquito. Of the 18 species of Aedes in NM, 13 are vectors of encephalitis or West Nile Virus. There won't be much water out in the wilderness, so they’ll be breeding in standing water around our homes. Mosquitoes aren't going to go away; they are going to become even more common in cities and towns, where the water is.

The termites, ticks, harvester ants and mosquitoes convince me spring is here, and global warming is a real thing. You’ll need to keep plenty of non-DEET mosquito repellant on hand.

news

The Daily Word in drones, reefer stores, hematomas and how the NSA controls your iPhone

Here's a list of local holiday closures to help you figure out when to put out your trash and stuff.

The Rio Grande is bone-dry in southern New Mexico.

Santa Fe's plastic bag ban takes effect February 27th 2014.

The Johnny Tapia film is coming soon.

NSA has 100% access to your iPhone. Messages, contacts—and they can remotely turn it into a listening device. Not cool.

Ariel Castro's neighbor was a murder-raping pig and he is going to jail.

Michael Schumacher is getting relatively better after his terrible skiing accident.

There is now a better cardboard box, people.

Cab Calloway's lexicon of hip will make you the life of the party before you cop a final.

Weed stores will open their doors in Denver tomorrow.

Dig this totally righteous anti-Nazi Christmas card from 1943.

You will need this guide to identifying and hiding from drones.

Buy Chuck Norris' house.

A tanker train exploded in North Dakota.

"The octopus-man would make a fine policeman or soldier ...."

news

The Daily Word in roll-coaster mishaps, a royal baby and Carlsbad farmers

Something royal this way comes ...

Police have identified one of three murder victims in East Cleveland, and they've charged 35-year-old Michael Madison with three counts of aggravated murder.

German roller-coaster manufacturer is sending experts to Arlington, Texas to investigate the death of a victim who died while riding the Texas Giant over the weekend.

Mohammed Morsi, recently ousted president of Egypt, has gone missing, and family claims he was "abducted by army."

Police are investigating the drowning of 19-year-old Matthew Mares in Los Lunas that happened over the weekend.

APD to testify today in court in a wrongful death lawsuit in relation to the shooting of 27-year-old Christopher Torres in 2011.

Carlsbad farmers could possibly receive less than half the water allotted to them from a network of wells that pump groundwater into the Pecos river.

In a nutshell: If you fake cancer and take $9,000 in donations from your community, then you're probably gonna go to jail.

V.22 No.29 | 7/18/2013

Food News

Bite Sized Edition

The Alibi’s monthly news buffet

By Nora Hickey
Nora Hickey rounds up bite sized news items from around the state.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

news

The Daily Word in Levi Chavez, Jenny McCarthy and the worst person in North America

The Levi Chavez trial comes to an end, for better or for worse. (It's probably worse.)

The latest police shooting at least has a certain comedic value.

The Bosque has reopened! Please don't set it on fire.

Noted pretty person, terrible actress and raving anti-vaccination lunatic Jenny McCarthy will join The View. I wonder how many kids she will (indirectly) kill during sweeps week?

Alanis Morisette's song has been rewritten to actually be ironic.

Even though Los Zetas leader Miguel Treviño (official Worst Person in the North America and responsible for some truly evil acts) has been captured, don't expect Mexican cartel violence to stop any time soon.

And finally, today it's ok to marry gay in the UK.

news

The Daily Word in Levi Chavez, water-swiping Texans and Sarah Palin redux

The recent rains mean that the National Forests aren't quite as likely to catch on fire if you camp in them. But you're still not allowed to do it yet.

Something something Levi Chavez trial something!

The Texans are coming for your water.

Behold, the strange and convoluted saga of the worst video game in the world! And charity marathon!

Sarah Palin is planning on running for senate.

Australia is spying on phone records too. But for really important reasons, like catching litterbugs.

You should be ashamed for giving up on Catch-22 after only 20 pages, but hey, at least you're not alone. Goodreads presents a graphic of the most commonly abandoned books.

news

MRGCD election Tuesday, June 4

It’s all about the water

If you own property in this green wedge, you can vote.
If you own property in this green wedge, you can vote.

Property owners in several New Mexico counties will head to the polls this Tuesday to elect board members for the agency that regulates the usage of the water trickling down the Rio Grande from Sandoval to Socorro counties.

The Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) is holding the election so that verified property owners can select board members for positions three and four in Bernalillo County and positions six and seven in Socorro and Sandoval counties, respectively. 

Nearly all the candidates agree that the most troubling issues facing the MRGCD is the area’s lack of water.

Incumbent Adrian Oglesby said persistent drought conditions over the past three years makes this one of the most important elections since the district was formed nearly 100 years ago. 

“The next four years will be critical, we are in the worst drought we ever seen, our reservoirs are functionally empty and we have huge infrastructure issues,” Oglesby said. “So the next four years we need really intelligent leadership to make sure the district survives.” 

The MRGCD with its 200 employees and $20 million budget is responsible for upkeep of drainage ditches, levees and canals along the Rio Grande from Cochiti Dam to Bosque Del Apache Wildlife Refuge. The district is also responsible for delivering water to nearly 60,000 acres of farmland for farms of all sizes, ranging from one-acre family plots to 900-acre commercial farming operations.

Oglesby said that in the past the MRGCD has relied on stored water to irrigate those farmlands, but aggressive drought conditions has him projecting that the stored water will run dry in early July. He added that water reserve depletion would amount to some pretty substantial losses and a big hit to the middle valley economy. 

“If that happens we are obligated to shut off water to everyone but the pueblos that have very senior water rights.  They have a small portion of water being held for that, and once that water runs out, then farming stops until it start raining again,” Oglesby said.

Jim Roberts is facing incumbent Karen Dunning for Position No. 3 in Bernalillo County. Adrian Oglesby will face challenger Louis Trujillo for Position No. 4 in Bernalillo County.  A third candidate, Andrew Leo Lopez died May 28. Lopez will remain on the ballot, and if he wins board members will appoint someone to take his seat. 

David Lorenzo C’ de Baca is challenging incumbent Derrick Lente for Sandoval County Position No. 7 and Chris Sichler faces challenger Jericho Sanchez for Socorro County’s Position No. 6. 

The nearly 80,000 eligible voters can cast their ballots at any one of 26 polling locations throughout Bernalillo, Sandoval, and Socorro counties. Unlike most elections, voters must show a driver’s license or state ID to cast their ballots because of a property rights requirement for voting.  Those who can’t supply ID or prove property ownership at the polls will be issued a provisional ballot.  

The MRGCD was formed in the mid-1920s primarily to drain ground water from farmlands in the Atrisco and Old Town areas of the city. However, a couple of years later, the District added irrigation to its list of responsibilities.

news

The Daily Word in shady dentistry, bear bile and riding a Ferris wheel for way too long

New Mexico's at the top of the list! Of worst droughts in the country!

And pumping water out of the ground just isn't working like it used to.

"El Dentista," an unlicensed dentist in Santa Fe who performed his "services" out of a van, left a trail of mouth infections and unnecessarily removed teeth in his wake. The New Mexico Department of Health is offering free counseling, blood testing and referrals to his victims. But remember, it could be worse.

Developers in Oklahoma are resistant to the idea of including tornado shelters in their homes because it costs too much money. Sad trombone.

Clinton Shepherd of Chicago just finished riding a Ferris wheel for two days straight. "I was thrilled and honored to be able to have all the love and support I did," Shepherd said.

And it turns out that increasing demand for bear bile (used in a nonsense "home-remedy") is really bad for bears.

News

The Daily Word in DREAMers, voters, bleeders and truckers

Today qualified young immigrants can begin applying for permits to avoid deportation.

Federally subsidized programs on Mitt Romney's fiscal hit list: Amtrak, PBS, arts, humanities.

Democratic voter registration is down in eight key "battleground" states with an uptick in registered independents.

Meanwhile, frays over voter registration issues heat up in key "battleground" states, including Florida, Iowa, Pennsylvania and New Mexico.

Two maps that track the impact of drought across the U.S.

Dusty Pop Art collection in Iran permitted to see the light of day.

Ailing Russian Kalishnikov factory buoyed by U.S. gun buyers.

Univision calls for inclusion of Latino perspectives in presidential debates.

Visine poisoning > diarrhea = jail.

Staying out of the woods because Aunt Flo is visiting and you're scared of getting mauled by a bear? Fear no more, says National Park Service.

Corrales votes down gun restrictions.

Horse slaughter plant plans nixed.

New Mexico trucking company tries to avoid workers comp payments, gets called out by Tennessee high court.

V.21 No.32 | 8/9/2012

Flyer on the Wall

Rock and Roll Fantasy

This typeface is not absurdly tough, yet its pointiness and near-illegibility lends a special aura of mystery that suggests magic, action and adventure. Find those things on Friday, Aug. 10, at the Launchpad (618 Central SW). Tenderizor, Glitter Dick, Contortionist and Drought conjure rainbows in the dark (and the like) beginning at 9:30 p.m. Admission is 21-and-over and $5. (JCC)

Google Earth icon Map Icon

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

Chaly / CC by-S.A. 2.0
Feature

Is “Megadrought” the new normal?

We've all heard the gloomy scenarios of global warming: extreme weather, drought, famine, breakdown of society, destruction of civilization. Here in New Mexico it feels like we’ve made the switch from esoteric to actual, from computer model to daily life. My perch in Placitas feels like a front-row seat to the apocalypse. Smoke is in the air. Neighbors are fighting over water. Some of my outdoor flower pots have melted in the heat. Wild animals are getting thirsty, hungry and bold. It turns out, this might just be the new normal for the American Southwest.

V.21 No.29 | 7/19/2012
Chaly / CC by-S.A. 2.0

Feature

Bone Dry

Southwest farms bite the dust as “megadrought” becomes the new normal

By Ari LeVaux

In a dirt parking lot near Many Farms, Ariz., a Navajo farmer sold me a mutton burrito. He hasn't used his tractor in two years, he told me, and he’s cooking instead of farming because "there isn't any water." He pointed east at the Chuska mountain range, which straddles the New Mexico border. In a normal year, water coming off the mountains reaches his fields, he said.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

News

The Daily Word in freedom fighters, not-so-soothing warmth and dark money

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.” Happy Birthday to Nelson Mandela.

Top Syrian defense ministers, including President Bashar al-Assad's brother-in-law, were killed in Damascus by a suicide bomber.

Shrinking Greenland ice sheet birthed a Manhattan-sized iceberg.

Track the extent of countrywide drought conditions.

City cracks down on illegal dog breeding.

Investigation of the Little Bear Fire initiated.

Santa Fe is the "best food town."

Senate Republicans heart secret donors.

"Outsized level of influence": an infographic.

The end of Penn State football is a possibility.

Should we be required to vote?

Sorry, but the Olympic mascots creep me out.

Just embrace the suck.

Ugh, I need some good news.

Life in an undersea space station.

News

The Daily Word in Nora Ephron, drought and community relations

R.I.P., Nora Ephron. The multi-talented writer and filmmaker died Tuesday of leukemia.

More than 32,000 residents were evacuated as a wildfire grows near Colorado Springs.

U.S. West isn't the only region suffering from severe drought and heat.

Unclear affiliations of gunmen who attacked a pro-regime TV station in Damascus. Syrian leader Assad said last night that the country is "at war."

A boat full of asylum-seekers capsized.

Significant handshake in Belfast.

Mississippi's last remaining abortion clinic could be on the verge of closure.

APD chief says new recruitment measures are helping address the department's high-stakes community relations problems.

Meanwhile, a new charity solicits funds for an officer battling cancer and a SWAT standoff with a man who committed suicide "is being investigated as an officer-involved shooting."

Hungry for the 4th best burger in the country?

What tomorrow's possible Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act could mean to you.

"Male chimpanzees are well known for violence … and the human encroachment on chimpanzee territory, such as in zoo environments, may exacerbate them."

Ye olde Tyne faire.

Nonmobile version