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V.23 No.50 | 12/11/2014

Arts Feature

A Long-Lost Field Guide for the Soul

Rediscover an ecstatic, mystic book of nature writing

How a slender volume unearthed by Terry Tempest and Brooke Williams in a dusty bookstore became the antidote to “a poverty of the soul.”
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.23 No.48 | 11/27/2014

[click to enlarge]
Jesse Schulz

La Jicarita

Welcome to Albuquerque

Nuclear meltdown capital of the world

Weekly Alibi’s latest collaboration with environmental politics journal La Jicarita examines a source of serious discontent, the radioactive contents of the Sandia Mixed Waste Landfill.
V.22 No.49 | 12/5/2013
Freaking Green by Laura F. Sanchez • CreateSpace • paperback • $11.99

Book Review

Breaking Green

Two young adult novels grapple with being green in a world intent on destroying itself.
V.22 No.34 |

news

The Daily Word in Syrian interventions, Albuquerque abortion bans, and OMG Miley Cyrus

The Daily Word

The Fort Hood gunman had an opportunity to make a final statement before sentencing. Here is a (paraphrased) transcript, "Defendant shrugged shoulders and mumbled 'Whatever man.'"

Santa Fe mulls over the eternal question of paper or plastic. Decides on paper. For everyone.

Yes, art can be a crime. In Russia. When it's a painting of Putin and Medvedev in women's underwear.

Looks like the abortion question will be on a Bernalillo County ballot sometime soon. Probably in a special election. Which will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. To decide on a ban that is already unconstitutional and will no doubt be overturned.

50 years after Martin Luther King, Jr. and the fight goes on.

Albuquerque is a top 20 city for early 20-somethings! Mainly because it's cheap to live here.

Looks like some kind of military intervention in Syria is inevitable.

But don't think about that. Miley Cyrus did a thing!

V.22 No.25 | 6/20/2013
Springs underwater and the coral reefs that live near them sustain other species.
Elizabeth Crook
Springs underwater and the coral reefs that live near them sustain other species.

Science

The Kinda Good News About Coral Peril

¡Viva la Science!

Vibrant coral community at submarine springs along the Caribbean Coast of Mexico.
Elizabeth Crook
Vibrant coral community at submarine springs along the Caribbean Coast of Mexico.
Rising carbon dioxide levels— and oh boy, do we haz them—lead to lower pH in our oceans. The lower the pH, the more acidic the water. Coral reefs, underwater structures notoriously unwilling to relocate, are stuck dealing with the result. A new paper shows that coral reefs that have been exposed to acidic waters are less dense and more fragile.

Marine scientist and paper co-author Adina Paytan points out that it could’ve been worse. “The good news is that they don't just die,” she says, in what one can only imagine to be a hollowly perky tone of voice. “They are able to grow and calcify, but they are not producing robust structures.”

Fortunately, what she’s not saying is that the whole wide world of coral has gone rickety. Scientists, being scientists, work hard to gather data that lets them make predictions about what will happen. In this case, the study focused on coral located near underwater springs off of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, where the ocean water becomes naturally more acidic.

Because, though they can simulate conditions in a laboratory, scientists can’t be deliberately acidifying coral environments in the wild, now can they? By looking at a place where coral is already surviving in conditions of higher acidity, the paper’s authors found a site “where nature is already doing the experiments for us,” explains Don Rice, program director in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Ocean Sciences.

For Paytan, the results mix not-terrible news with a concise course of action. "We need to protect corals from other stressors, such as pollution and overfishing. If we can control those, the impact of ocean acidification might not be as bad."

Source: nsf.gov

V.22 No.19 |

news

The Daily Word in high flying, Benghazi Benghazi Benghazi, and goats riding horses

The Daily Word

Summer is here and it's time to jump in the water. Free swim lessons for low-income kids!

Unlicensed pilot busted at Double Eagle for flying too high. Or something. I'm not sure how to make this joke actually. He had a plane full of pot, is what I'm trying to say.

Under Susana Martinez, the New Mexico Environment Department isn't so worried about New Mexico's environment. Here's one more example.

Another U.S. Army official whose job is to stop sexual assault has been charged with sexual assault.

The media doesn't think the Obama administration's assault on civil liberties is so minor when it's happening to them.

Maybe those Benghazi emails were doctored?

And finally, visit Newfoundland. Because of this goat riding on a horse.

V.21 No.46 | 11/15/2012

Arts

Beehive Collective swarms Albuquerque today

A group of political illustrators is coming to talk about process today at Small Engine Gallery at 6 p.m. Read up on the collective’s pollination of the grassroots and then head down there this evening. The talk is free. For more on the event, go to bit.ly/BeeMind. For more on the nonprofit, all-volunteer, art organization, check out beehivecollective.org.

V.21 No.46 |

News

The Daily Word in BP, poorest president and Pong

The Daily Word

BP's looking at a $4.5 billion fine and criminal charges against staff members.

The gap between rich and poor in New Mexico is the widest in the nation.

Pit bull terriers killed a Chihuahua and sent her owner to the hospital.

Debbie O'Malley might remain on the Council and take a seat on the County Commission.

Remember when 48 women training for the military said they'd been sexually assaulted or harassed by their instructors? The Air Force has a weird solution: Trainees must have a wingman all the time.

Nonstop flights from Albuquerque to New York.

FBI investigates death threats against the guy holding the coyote-killing contest in Los Lunas.

The poorest president in the world. "If you don't have many possessions, then you don't need to work all your life like a slave to sustain them."

Violence escalates in Gaza and Israel. Rockets kill 15 Palestinians and three Israelis.

Louisiana governor is the first Republican to denounce Mitt Romney's notion that he lost the election because President Obama gave gifts to minorities and youth.

5-Hour Energy shot-like drink blamed for 13 deaths.

Colorado Visitors Bureau plans NOT to capitalize on legal recreational marijuana.

Science looks at rappers' brains to find the basis of improvisation.

Pong is 40-years-old and no one has topped it, says this guy.

How to become as observant as Sherlock Holmes. (Also, "Sherlock," the BBC miniseries available on Netflix instawatch, is dope.)

V.21 No.46 | 11/15/2012

Culture Shock

The Hive Minds

Political art group draws up the cost of coal

For two years, members of The Beehive Collective interviewed hundreds of people about how mountaintop removal and coal mining affected their lives. After those conversations, the hive's illustrators drew up visual metaphors and scenes from the stories they'd been told.
V.21 No.44 |

news

The Daily Word in hazmat, more Gangnam Style and Penn State prez

The Daily Word

People in Santa Teresa, N.M., were told to stay inside and seal windows and vents. Turns out, 200 people got sick, and an unknown hazardous material caused it. The industrial park reopened yesterday.

Gary Johnson's campaign splices him into the presidential debates.

Guy rode his bike through Hurricane Sandy.

Back East, people are lined up for miles to get gas.

Former Penn State president charged with perjury in Sandusky scandal.

Gene Hackman knew the dude he slapped in Santa Fe.

Dr. Kevorkian's paintings.

City councilors lodge an ethics complaint against a pro-minimum wage hike group.

Campaign finance reports filed today. So, how much did those legislative campaigns blow?

Noam Chomsky Gangnam Style

10 election oddities explained. By the British.

Is America ready for a female president?

V.21 No.29 | 7/19/2012

opinion

OyP: This guv is a policy wrecking ball

Jerry Ortiz y Pino opines that Gov. Susana Martinez is on a neocon crusade of destruction. But the public can’t see it yet, he writes, because the media fawns over her so.

Most voters’ impressions of a governor are shaped by media coverage. On TV, we get split-second footage: She's cutting ribbons, smiling at children, waving to crowds, and looking perky at a rally or solemn at a memorial. ... The honeymoon ain't over yet, even after 18 months.

Ortiz y Pino

The Guv’s Crusade of Destruction

Gov. Susana Martinez is not being held accountable for much of what has happened on her watch. Until reporters begin to dig into the consequences of her policy initiatives, the public will continue to hold her in high regard.
V.21 No.21 | 5/24/2012
Larry J. King stands behind his house in Church Rock, N.M., and talks about the site where Hydro Resources, Inc. intends to mine.
Courtesy of Red Rock Pictures
Larry J. King stands behind his house in Church Rock, N.M., and talks about the site where Hydro Resources, Inc. intends to mine.

News

The hunt for ore

Reporter Christie Chisholm spoke with Larry J. King, a Navajo man who’s fighting Hydro Resources, Inc. The company wants to mine an aquifer under Church Rock, N.M.

Rooting around in the aquifer for uranium will make the water in it undrinkable, says Rich Abitz, a geochemist, in the story. The EPA has agreed to look into the company’s permit.

King has also started a campaign on Change.org that asks people to sign a petition to prevent the mining.

“Being in the Southwest, and being where every drop of water is precious—and where water is sacred, too—we need to preserve the water not only for ourselves but for future generations,” says King. “Without water, there is nothing.”

Larry J. King stands behind his house in Church Rock, N.M., and talks about the site where Hydro Resources, Inc. intends to mine.
Courtesy of Red Rock Pictures

Environment

Navajo Group Fights Aquifer Mine

The Navajo Nation outlawed uranium mining and processing in 2005 in response to high cancer rates. Yet Larry J. King is one of many members of the tribe who are fighting plans to mine uranium from an aquifer.
V.21 No.18 | 5/3/2012
The small lot of the Smith’s gas station on Constitution and Carlisle lacks space for cars to wait while others refuel.
Andy Carrasco

Newscity

Fuel to the Fire

Every day, fumes, traffic snarls and tanker trucks aggravate neighbors of the Smith's gas station on Constitution and Carlisle. And with a permit for the station to sell more fuel, the situation isn’t going to get any easier.

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Holy Shit! Art show
Holy Shit! Art show12.20.2014