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V.22 No.39 | 9/26/2013
“Tiger, Tiger”

Art Magnified

The World Inside

Matchbook photomontages ignite everyday magic

Matchboxes from around the globe open to reveal worlds of hidden and layered imagination.
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V.22 No.37 | 9/12/2013
Ester Hernandez, “Sun Raid,” 2008, serigraph on paper
[click to enlarge]
Collection of the McNay Art Museum, gift of Drs. Harriett and Ricardo Romo

Arts Feature

The Mexican Abides

“¡Ask a Mexican!” columnist on art and la raza

Gustavo Arellano talks politics and satire in Chicano art at the Albuquerque Museum.
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PHOTOS

When It Was Now

New Mexican photographer exhibits 9/11 images

Saint Nicholas
“Saint Nicholas”

History has snuck up on me. One moment, it was now: when I first heard the news of the planes crashing. I recall it clearly—as do many of you—and it’s irrelevant that we remember different moments. It seems enough that we remember.

Lew Outside
“Lew Outside”

Then it was a little after now, when America battened its hatches, put flag stickers on its minivans, unironically used the descriptor “Homeland” and wrote memos rationalizing torture. Yet the constant thread during that time, however insane or useless it was in application, remained remembrance of 9/11.

I recall being 6 or 7 and not really knowing what the Vietnam War was or when it had happened—and I remember seeing in my grandpa’s face how my ignorance wounded him a little. A veteran of the Air Force, he’d served in WWII, Korea and Vietnam; of course it was unimaginable that Vietnam wasn’t looming large in all American minds.

When I talk to someone too young to remember that now shared so viscerally by the rest of us, it feels shocking, even though it shouldn’t.

Fuselage
“Fuselage”

Photographer Eric O’Connell was living in Manhattan when 9/11 happened. His personal story is pretty amazing—he’s lucky to be alive—but mostly what’s worth noting is the now that he captured on film in all its awful chaos and chilling stillness. The shared remembrance that so many of us possess, the way we still exchange the where-I-was-when stories, must slowly but inexorably give way to a remembrance grounded in images like these.

Watching
photos courtesy of Eric O’Connell
“Watching”
Opening reception for A New Reality: Photographs of 9/11 by Eric O’Connell

Wednesday, Sept. 11, 5:30 to 8pm
Albuquerque Photographer’s Gallery
303 Romero NW
(upstairs)
244-9195, abqphotographersgallery.com
Arts

Frederico Vigil’s Prelude to a Monument

Full-size sketches illuminate fresco master’s process

Frederico Vigil touching up one of his cartoons in the gallery at Nahalat Shalom
[click to enlarge]
Hershel Weiss
Frederico Vigil touching up one of his cartoons in the gallery at Nahalat Shalom

A fresco isn’t like a painting. You can’t just pencil out a few shapes, squeeze some acrylic out of a tube and get going. You certainly don’t freehand it. Creating a masterpiece like Frederico Vigil’s 4000-square-foot fresco in the Torreón at the National Hispanic Cultural Center requires undertaking a complex series of well-timed steps. How complex? Your guess is as good as mine, but tomorrow, Aug. 31, you can learn about the fresco process from an acknowledged master of the medium and view seven of his full-size fresco cartoons at the closing reception for “Cartones del Torreón: Full Scale Drawings for the Torreón at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.”

Along the concave wall of the Torreón, Vigil’s monumental work depicts 3 millennia of Hispanic history in buon fresco, or “true” fresco, in which pigments are suspended in water and applied directly onto wet lime plaster. A skilled artist must work quickly and precisely; the color becomes one with the plaster as it dries, making buon fresco an especially vivid and durable medium. (Rome, you know, still has some nice ones from the 13th century.) As tools for planning and composition, cartoons are a vital stage of the fresco process. In addition, they act as stencils so the artist’s lines can be transferred accurately to the freshly laid plaster.

These seven cartoons by Vigil for the Torreón fresco, unseen by the public before this exhibition, are startling artworks in their own right. Make tracks to the North Valley for your last chance to see them at Nahalat Shalom Art Gallery (3606 Rio Grande NW) from 5 to 7pm.

Closing Reception and Presentation on the Fresco Process With Frederico Vigil

Saturday, Aug. 31, 5 to 7pm
Nahalat Shalom Art Gallery
3606 Rio Grande Blvd. NW.
nahalatshalom.org
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    Jimmy Thackery
    Jimmy Thackery4.21.2014