farming


V.27 No.49 | 12/6/2018
Grow the Growers

Fresh Off the Farm

Applications Open for Grow the Growers

Farm incubator in the South Valley accepting newbies

Grow the Growers is a farm training and business incubator program unique in that it doesn’t rely on any federal funding, and it offers land and water at very reasonable rates to the interns who complete the first year of the program.
V.27 No.28 | 7/12/2018
Eating Animals

Film Review

Eating Animals

Farming documentary hopes to influence food choices

Eating Animals spends its time talking about sustainable alternative solutions to factory farms, giving in to neither hardcore carnivores nor militant animal lovers.
Farmer’s Daughters dinners bring people together to eat local
courtesy of Farmer’s Daughters

Fresh Off the Farm

Farm-to-Table at Hotel Albuquerque

Farmer’s Daughters and Chef Gilbert Aragon create unique dinner series

Despite the growing farm-to-table movement in recent decades, most farmers are still facing an uphill battle to be profitable due to rising land costs, increased development and climate change. Ashley and Chantelle Wagner created their company Farmer’s Daughters to get more local produce served in New Mexico restaurants, breweries and food trucks.
V.27 No.15 | 4/12/2018
Reyna Banteah
Unek Francis

Farmer Spotlight

Reyna Banteah of Ts’uyya Farm

New South Valley farmer uses traditional Zuni growing methods

Reyna Banteah is farming on her own for the first time at Ts’uyya Farm, having completed the Grow the Growers internship and moving on to business incubation.

Weekly Specials

Reasons to Shop the Downtown Growers’ Market

The first Downtown Growers’ Market of the year is this Saturday, 8am to noon on April 14. If you’re not already a farmers’ market convert, here are some reasons why you should be.
V.27 No.13 | 3/29/2018

Farmer Spotlight

Casey Holland of Chispas Farms

New South Valley farm grows veggies and young farmers

If you shop at the Downtown Growers’ Market during the season, you’ve probably seen Casey Holland selling huge bunches of kale and carrots with a smile on her face. Now she’s the new head farmer at Chispas Farm.
V.26 No.5 | 2/2/2017
Olivia Hubert and Greg Willerer
Kathleen Hensley

Culture Shock

The Unsettling of America

Author Mark Sundeen profiles farmers on the fringe in his newest book

Sundeen illustrates for readers how possible—not easy—but how definitely possible, it is to live in accordance with one's convictions.
V.25 No.31 | 08/04/2016

Event Horizon

The End is Nigh!

Saturday, Aug 13: Backyard Farming: Weeds of the West

Experts provide experience and information to transform backyards into a thriving oasis of food, medicine and wildlife habitats. Learn to identify, the medicinal uses of and how to cook weeds of the west.
V.25 No.30 | 7/28/2016

Food News

My Beer Will Go On

Heimat House closes, farmers expect rise in produce prices thanks to the drought, pecan growers want to use banned pesticide, the best way to pack your kids’ lunches, Rancho de Chimayó wins highest esteem, vote for the best green chile cheeseburger
V.25 No.20 | 05/19/2016

Event Horizon

Hive Five!

Saturday, May 28: Bees and Seeds Festival

Second annual fest with eco-friendly vendors, food trucks, artists and professional beekeepers. Free plants available courtesy of Red Tractor Farm.
V.25 No.5 | 02/04/2016
via arc-a.org

Sustainable Local Agriculture at Casa San Ysidro

On Saturday, February 13 at 1:30pm the public is invited to a free program,
"Food, Farms, Friends," explaining the new partnership between three valued community organizations—NM Land Conservancy, the ARCA and Casa San Ysidro—designed to promote sustainable local agriculture.

This year, ARCA will commence farming the nearly two acre Heritage Field at Casa San Ysidro, fulfilling the Museum's intent to preserve New Mexican heritage by allowing the Museum to keep the Heritage Field agriculturally productive and expand Casa San Ysidro's educational programming and community involvement to include local agriculture.

The program is co-hosted by the Corrales Historical Society and will be held in the Old Church located across the street from Casa San Ysidro: The Gutierrez/Minge House (973 Old Church, Corrales) From 1pm-4pm. Free open house tours and blacksmithing demonstrations at the historic Casa San Ysidro. The public is invited to learn more about these three organizations and explore the history of agriculture in the Rio Abajo area of New Mexico.

For more information about this program and the historic Casa San Ysidro, visit cabq.gov/casasanysidro.

V.21 No.29 | 7/19/2012
Chaly / CC by-S.A. 2.0

Feature

Is “Megadrought” the new normal?

We've all heard the gloomy scenarios of global warming: extreme weather, drought, famine, breakdown of society, destruction of civilization. Here in New Mexico it feels like we’ve made the switch from esoteric to actual, from computer model to daily life. My perch in Placitas feels like a front-row seat to the apocalypse. Smoke is in the air. Neighbors are fighting over water. Some of my outdoor flower pots have melted in the heat. Wild animals are getting thirsty, hungry and bold. It turns out, this might just be the new normal for the American Southwest.

Chaly / CC by-S.A. 2.0

Feature

Bone Dry

Southwest farms bite the dust as “megadrought” becomes the new normal

In a dirt parking lot near Many Farms, Ariz., a Navajo farmer sold me a mutton burrito. He hasn't used his tractor in two years, he told me, and he’s cooking instead of farming because "there isn't any water." He pointed east at the Chuska mountain range, which straddles the New Mexico border. In a normal year, water coming off the mountains reaches his fields, he said.

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V.21 No.2 | 1/12/2012
George and Marilyn Keepseagle at their ranch on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota
Courtesy of Cohen, Milstein, Sellers and Toll law firm

News

Class action payout for Native farmers

Alibi reporter Carolyn Carlson drove out to Gallup at the end of December to speak with claimants for a $760 million settlement. The payout is the result of a class action lawsuit—Keepseagle v. Vilsack— brought by Native American farmers who were denied USDA loans by a prejudiced Department of Agriculture.

The court battle was 13 years long.

After it was over, lawyers went to different parts of the country to find people who qualified for part of the settlement. About 300 people from New Mexico filed claims.

This isn’t the first time the Agriculture Department’s been in hot water for discrimination:

• In October 2011, African-American farmers settled their case against the Agriculture Department for $1.2 billion.

• In March 2011, women and Hispanic farmers settled their lawsuit for $1.3 billion.

George and Marilyn Keepseagle at their ranch on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota
Courtesy of Cohen, Milstein, Sellers and Toll law firm

News Feature

Justice for Native Farmers

Class action settlement to benefit New Mexicans

The U.S. District Court approved the Keepseagle v. Vilsack class action settlement of $760 million. Lawyers sought out potential claimants for that money—including people in New Mexico.