film


V.26 No.42 | 10/19/2017
Only the Brave

Film Review

Only The Brave

Hotshots fight fire with fire in true-life tragedy

Celebrating the bravery and brotherhood of cocky, good-looking American boys battling a nameless, faceless foe is Only the Brave’s job and it does so with a single-mindedness that makes it strong, tense and emotionally gripping.
V.26 No.40 | 10/5/2017
Thirst Street

Film Review

Thirst Street

Erotic thriller or winking parody: sexy indie straddles the line

The softcore European erotica of the ’70s had a dark, cautionary edge to it, and Thirst Street carries this inspiration forward into its natural, horror movie extreme.
V.26 No.39 | 9/28/2017
Battles of the Sexes

Film Review

Battle of the Sexes

Sporting flashback has a lot to say about gender, sexuality

Battle of the Sexes is about two people trying to figure out who and what they are—at a time when society is happy to dictate exactly who and what they are.
V.26 No.38 | 9/21/2017
Stronger

Film Review

Stronger

Unvarnished memoir of the Boston bombings trades exploitation for emotion

Stronger is a refreshingly down-to-earth look at recent, real-world horrors that is neither “too soon!” nor too manipulative.
V.26 No.36 | 9/7/2017
Neither Wolf Nor Dog

Film Review

Neither Wolf Nor Dog

Roadtrip through Lakota country is slow but sincere in its message

In Neither Wolf Nor Dog, a Minnesota-based writer travels to meet an inscrutable elder Native, to learn and tell his story.
V.26 No.35 | 8/31/2017
Patti Cake$

Film Review

Patti Cake$

8 Mile goes to Jersey in beat-dropping indie drama

There’s just enough charisma and likability on display throughout Patti Cake$ to make you wish the man behind it were as interested in originality as he was in sentimental manipulation, crowd-pleasing formulas and rhyming insults.
V.26 No.34 | 8/24/2017
David Bowie and Mick Ronson

Film Review

Beside Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story

Portrait of unsung guitar god lets you doc out with your rock out

Beside Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story provides an enlightening crash-course in the glitter-and-guitar-heavy glam rock era while simultaneously singing the praises of one of the music industry’s most talented hidden figures.
V.26 No.33 | 8/17/2017
Shot Caller

Film Review

Shot Caller

Prison drama succeeds in making life behind bars look bad—which isn’t much of a challenge, really

Despite some committed acting and some gloomy cinematography, Shot Caller is far too melodramatic and drags its twisty story out far too long to have the solid, gut-punch impact it so desperately wants.
V.26 No.32 | 8/10/2017
Brigsby Bear

Film Review

Brigsby Bear

Oddball indie comedy looks at the dangers of nostalgia and the joys of fandom

Brigsby Bear is a bit too self-conscious of the dorkiness of its main character and of the hipster profundity in his Quixote-esque quest, but the overall intent is sincere and openhearted enough to overcome the script familiarities and character tropes.
V.26 No.31 | 8/3/2017
Lady Macbeth

Film Review

Lady Macbeth

Impolite BBC drama is bad romance at its best

Far too stark to call Gothic, way too bleak to call romantic, Lady Macbeth is a violent heartbreaker for those who prefer broken hearts to happy endings.
V.26 No.30 | 7/27/2017
A  Ghost Story

Film Review

A Ghost Story

Minimalist tale of life and death may be saying something, but it’s keeping awfully quiet

A Ghost Story is self-consciously arty and aggressively dull. If you cut out the scenes in which nothing moves, nothing happens and no one speaks, the entire film would be about 10 minutes long.
V.26 No.29 | 7/20/2017
Dunkirk

Film Review

Dunkirk

Christopher Nolan goes to war in a heart-pounding, historical drama about victory in the jaws of defeat

Dunkirk expresses the panic, fear and sheer chaos of war better than just about any previous film.
V.26 No.28 | 7/13/2017
The Little Hours

Film Review

The Little Hours

Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza and Kate Micucci are naughty nuns in oddball literary adaptation

The Little Hours is a send-up of the absurd idea of sin and that human beings can actually give up their sins of the flesh, but Jeff Baena’s attentions are focused on the fact that cursing, drunken, fornicating nuns are funny as hell.
V.26 No.27 | 7/6/2017
Baby Driver

Film Review

Baby Driver

Edgar Wright takes an eclectic cast on a high-speed joyride with the stereo cranked to 11

Baby Driver isn’t all testosterone-fueled explosions and physics-defying stunts. It’s a gritty, guns-and-bullets character study done with panache, skill and a slice of humor.
V.26 No.26 | 6/29/2017
The Hero

Film Review

The Hero

Sam Elliott’s fictional career looks suspiciously like his real one in slow-going indie drama

In The Hero, what aims to be a self-referential, self-deprecating, late-career look back at regret ends up as a frustratingly predictable film with an overqualified, underutilized star standing front-and-center.