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First Friday Fractals

Say that 10 times fast. After that, head down to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History's Planetarium (1801 Mountain NW) for its super-successful First Friday Fractals. A fractal is a geometric shape that can be split into smaller, equal partstheoretically, forever. Picture a snowflake or a crystal. It just so happens these mathematical wonders look absolutely amazing on a big screen, like a Fear and Loathing-inspired acid trip without the nasty side effects or legal run-ins. The visual escapade plays today at 6, 7 and 8 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, $7 for seniors and $5 for children ages 3 to 12. These do sell out regularly. For more information and to secure tickets, visit fractalfoundation.org.

V.20 No.14 | 4/7/2011

Culture Shock

By John Bear

What Is That Which Gives Me Joy? Baseball!

Baseball wasn't always played by steroid-addled freaks. Babe Ruth hit more than 700 home runs and was drunk, smoking a cigar, eating a hot dog and cavorting with underage prostitutes the whole time. And that was just on the field. Lots of people say it’s boring, but they’re wrong. It’s a game of anticipation.

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Tania Goldfeder-Wolfe
Balloon Fiesta

This Week's Feature: 2010 Unofficial Balloon Fiesta Guide, Fractal Man’s amazing homegrown flying machine

The Fractal Man's amazing homegrown flying machine! Mathematician has airborne art down to a science.

And, check out our Balloon Fiesta 2010 Schedule, along with parking, pricing, and transportation info.

V.19 No.39 | 9/30/2010
Eric Williams ericwphoto.com

Feature

The Fractal Man's Amazing Homegrown Flying Machine!

Mathematician has airborne art down to a science

By Marisa Demarco

All balloonists think they fly the most beautiful thing in the sky, says Jonathan Wolfe. "And they're wrong," he laughs.

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V.19 No.26 | 7/1/2010

Culture Shock

By Patricia Sauthoff

F’Yeah Fractals

For the mathematically uninclined, calculus looks less like math and more like an indecipherable secret language. Instead of explaining anything, it simply adds more mystery and, often, a little bit of fear. Fortunately, math fans and foes can get together under the domed ceiling of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (1801 Mountain NW) to see math in action in a much more meaningful manner. “First Friday Fractals” takes mathematically complex geometric shapes, projects them, zooms in close to show their detail and complexity, and makes math beautiful. Shows are Friday, July 2, at 6, 7 and 8 p.m. The cost is $5 for kids 3 to 12, $7 for seniors and $10 for everybody else. Get tickets at nmnaturalhistory.org or at the museum.

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News

The World’s Largest Fractal Triangle

In celebration of Pi Day (3.14), Albuquerque’s Fractal Foundation constructed the biggest Sierpinski Triangle Fractal in the world.

About 40 volunteers got together in the 505 to assemble 4,036 triangles made by children from around the world. They only needed 2,187 to make a seventh-order fractal triangle, which would be 96 feet per side. But there were so many submissions, they just kept building.

Next year, they’ll push it even further with an eighth-order fractal triangle, which is a whopping 196 feet per side and needs 6,561 triangles.

Teachers and parents can mail completed fractal triangles to:

Fractal Foundation, 2917 Campus Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

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