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Leaked: Gizmodo Gleefully Exploits Unreleased Next-Generation iPhone Found in Bar Near Apple Headquarters

On the outside, the device was “camouflaged to look like an iPhone 3GS.” So Gizmodo disassembled it.
gizmodo.com
On the outside, the device was “camouflaged to look like an iPhone 3GS.” So Gizmodo disassembled it.

Technology blog Gizmodo published photos and a video of the unreleased next-generation iPhone, exposing new features and a new design for one of Apple’s signature products.

The phone now boasts two camera lenses, and the presence of a front-facing camera indicates that video calling will be a feature on upcoming iPhones. Gizmodo wrote that other new features include a higher-resolution screen, a larger battery and a glass back that should improve cellular reception. In early April, Apple demonstrated the upcoming version of its iPhone OS, announcing that it will include sought-after features like the ability to run multiple applications at the same time. With the hardware and software of the new iPhone now public knowledge, a clear picture of the upcoming device is beginning to form.

The iPhone was given to Gizmodo by a man who found the device in a Redwood City, Calif. bar close to Apple headquarters The blog’s editors thoroughly examined the phone, pointing out on video that it now has not one, but two volume buttons. Trivial details aside, they also cracked open the case to uncover several “Apple”-labeled parts, and essentially proved the legitimacy of the device when Apple sent a letter requesting that the blog return “a device that belongs to Apple.”

For those seeking more information, Gizmodo is treating this leak as the biggest tech story in history and has published multiple features about the new iPhone, ranging from a play-by-play account of how the Apple employee in charge of the phone lost it and how it ended up at Gizmodo to a rebuttal of “conspiracy theorists” who alleged that Apple had staged the leak to ensure that the phone received plenty of pre-release hype and media coverage.

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