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V.22 No.29 | 7/18/2013

Music

Story of Her Life: Waxing nostalgic about Loretta Lynn’s Van Lear Rose

By Mark Lopez [ Wed Jul 17 2013 2:34 PM ]

Loretta Lynn & Jack White - “Portland, Oregon”
It's been almost a decade since Loretta Lynn's last record, Van Lear Rose, hit the shelves. A lot has gone down in those nine years. We've seen some of the worst natural disasters in history (BP anyone?), and we've also seen a further-magnified shift from music being played on LP devices to almost exclusively digital formats. Yet that's one of the great things about a record—it has the power to take you back. Back to where? That depends on the person, but the whole premise of a good album rests on the fact it doesn't lose its touch as the casing weathers or when the charts don't signify its importance, as it once did.

So, why is Loretta Lynn's latest record so important? Take for instance the fact that she released the album when she was 72. And, instead of having country music aficionados take the reins in the production booth, she enlisted the help of contemporary garage-rocker Jack White (most famous then for his work in The White Stripes). Seeing these two walk down the red carpet at the Grammys together might seem odd out of context, but having listened to the album, it makes perfect sense. The bond created during the recording of these 13 tracks isn't something that disappears once the lights go out and the track is deemed fit for airplay. Because if you listen to this record, you can hear the molding of this friendship manifest in the way Lynn sings—with the same vibrant twang that made her a household country name—and the way White offers a rock and roll background, letting Loretta shine amidst electric guitars, booming drums and the quieter, softer moments; see “Miss Being Mrs.”

Van Lear Rose is one of those albums that are meant to be played all the way through—no skipping. It tells a story: from the time Lynn was a girl, sitting with her coal miner father, listening to him tell the story of how he met her mother (“Van Lear Rose”) to reflecting on what made her life so joyous, but at the same time wondering where it all leads (“Story of My Life”). Looking back, I'm not surprised it won the Grammy Award for Best Country Album or ended up in the top 10 of so many year-end “best of” lists. It's a gem. Simple as that.

Part of the reason the album hit so hard is that Loretta Lynn is still that hard-talking, freewheeling, lovable woman she started out as—with her classic hit “Coal Miner's Daughter” and other notable songs like “You Ain't Woman Enough” and “Rated 'X.'” Even in her golden years, she is the same person, and she covers the same emotional ground that made her famous in the first place, ie. cheating husbands, childbirth and motherhood and struggling to make ends meet. Just listen to tracks like “Mrs. Leroy Brown” or “Family Tree,” where she takes her kids to the home of the woman their dad is cheating with and asks the husband to come out and see what he's doing to their family. That's real talk.

But it’s an album that couldn't exist without the confluence of measure. What I mean by that is the importance of knowing your limits and knowing when to let someone help out. I’m not saying Lynn has limits; maybe she does, but they're not shown on this record, and she wrote all the songs. But she knows when to let White work in his expertise, particularly on lead single “Portland, Oregon.” A drunken love song in every sense of the word, the lead guitar moves through the track like a forceful river yet calms down enough for the duo to shine—while asking the bartender for one more sloe gin fizz and “a pitcher to go.”

But don't take my word for it. I'm not even that into country music, but I’ve had a soft spot for Loretta Lynn since I watched Coal Miner's Daughter as a toddler. She was just one of those singer/songwriters who always had a presence in my childhood. This is not only one of the best albums of 2004. This is one of the best albums ever recorded, and I’ll stand by that like a man whose britches are in sync with love for all kinds of music. It’s a masterpiece. Enough said.

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V.21 No.50 | 12/13/2012

news

The Daily Word in newspapers, DeLoreans and other nice dreams

By Marisa Demarco [ Thu Dec 6 2012 11:31 AM ]
The Daily Word

Winners of the Albuquerque Walter White lookalike contest.

DA to resume probing officer-involved shootings. (The investigative grand jury process was suspended months ago after criticism that no jury had ever found a shooting unjustified.)

Santa Fe man gets his bass back 10 years later.

The terribly-named band fun. has gotten the most Grammy nominations.

Sen. Michelle Obama?

Gamelan ensemble covers Gang of Four’s “Not Great Men.”

R.I.P., Dave Brubeck.

Shit London photography contest. Awesome.

Some wealthy people are investing in newspapers.

5 things smart people do. 1) make numbered lists of things ....

DeLorean taxi.

Why X-Men continuity is forever hosed.

Also, Benedict Cumberbatch is in the next Star Trek movie as the villain.

China’s first jack-off competition is what it sounds like.

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V.20 No.6 | 2/10/2011
Go, Gathering of Nations
Go, Gathering of Nations

Music

Local organization nominated for Grammy

By Jessica Cassyle Carr [ Fri Feb 11 2011 2:40 PM ]

This year’s Grammy nominees include a mostly nauseating cast of sonic bullshit purveyors like Eminem, Lady Antebellum, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, Justin Bieber, Jeff Beck and Kenny G. To be fair, some cool groups are nominated— Goldfrappe, The Black Keys, Iron Maiden. Another legitimate nominee for the music industry’s most prestigious award is one local organization. Yes, 2010 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow: A Spirit’s Dance, was nominated for “Best Native American Music Album.” Congratulations, Gathering of Nations. You can watch The 53rd Annual Grammy Awards on Sunday at 7 p.m. on KRQE-13.

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V.19 No.38 | 9/23/2010

Music

Honk, honk, honk your harmonica for fabulous cash prizes in Socorro.

By Nick Brown [ Fri Oct 1 2010 3:21 PM ]

My old pal Ronna Kalish (who was in the Twigs, a great Albuquerque band of yesteryear) sent me a reminder about the Socorro Fest Harmonica Contest on October 9th. There are still a few slots available for your own sloppy, drooly harmonica stylings, should you feel so inclined. You know you want to. I think you’ll win, Harmonica Person. Here’s the blurb:

CALLING ALL HARMONICA PLAYERS! Enter the Socorro Fest Harmonica Contest today. For a $25 entry fee, get the chance to win a $250 first prize, $150 second prize or $100 third prize. Play any musical style for five minutes and WOW the judges. Be part of this very fun music and arts festival on Saturday, October 9th. To enter: call 575-835-8927 or email tourism@socorronm.gov or download a registration form at www.socorrofest.com.

And there’s more. Whether you win or not, Socorro Fest will be happening for two days… with bands, and beer, and wine and food. Here’s the other blurb:

SOCORRO FEST, Friday and Saturday, October eighth and ninth on the historic Socorro Plaza. An easy drive 75 miles south of Albuquerque, Socorro Fest will have a street dance on Friday night, 6 to 10pm with Grammy award winner Terrance Simien and the Zydeco Experience, followed by Socorro’s best variety band, Remedy. Saturday, noon to midnight, features three stages of music highlighted by jam band Asper Kourt, gypsy jazz with Le Chat Lunatique, Louisiana’s Cajun-creole-zydeco band with Terrance Simien, high energy rock with Tangled Up, plus Socorro’s best folk, blues, rock, country and Spanish bands. There will be New Mexico microbreweries and wineries, arts and food vendors, family activities, Free State of Socorro, Enchanted Skies Star Party events, and more! For more info, see www.socorrofest.com

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