high school


V.25 No.16 | 04/21/2016

News

The Daily Word in space menses, Vietnamese brides and the moon of Makemake

The Daily Word

Ever pondered space menses?

Hillary Clinton is setting up offices in ABQ.

A local high school baseball team is cheering up a sick teen for her birthday.

This article will bridge the gap in your knowledge of bridges.

There is a massive and awful market in China for Vietnamese brides.

A moon has been discovered that orbits the dwarf planet Makemake.

For all those adults who don't have a squad, here's how to get one.

Curious about demonology?

Don't feel bad, plankton get drunk too.

This is the most polluted city.

V.25 No.2 | 01/14/2016

The Daily Word in the culprit of the Bacha Khan University attacks, marriage, and NM's leading cause of death

The Daily Word

Conflicting claims on who is responsible for the attack on Bacha Khan University.

Check out the official suicide squad trailer (finally).

Parents being unreasonable about marriage.

In the last decade NM's most distinctive cause of death has been interactions with law enforcement. Incredible.

Neat garage, bro.

Spotify absorbed some startups and will be trying some new stuff.

A fight between high-schoolers in Santa Fe ends with a hospitalized girl.

Surfer Blood
Megan Reneau

Riding Waves into Santa Fe

I don’t go to Santa Fe to see shows often. The only other time I’ve traveled there for a show was to see my favorite band for the first time early 2015, and that was at a venue on the edge of Santa Fe, so you can say I’m not familiar with their scene. The two venues I’ve been to there are pretty similar and notably different from Burque places; they’re older and have a more traditionally New Mexican aesthetic, have more seating and there’s a noticeable range of age in concert-goers.

My friend and I walked through a passageway and entered Skylight Santa Fe into their bar. We got our beers and headed up to the top floor of the place and sat above and to the left of the stage. I looked at the crowd and saw the wide range of ages amongst the concert-goers; people in their teens to their mid-40s were all eagerly waiting for the show to begin. The crowd gathered as the first band, Cayucas, began playing onstage but left a large space between them and the band.

Cayucas is a fraternal duo from southern California which is obvious when you hear them. The excellent SoCal lo-fi, surf pop band was joined by a bassist and drummer for their tour. Their calm melodies are fantastic, especially when combined with mellow vocals and a subtle sense of nostalgia thrown in every so often instigated by the distinct surf rock reverb. During their song “High School Lover” lead singer, Zach Yudin, got off the stage and slow danced with an audience member. When he got back on stage he said “I wish I could go back to high school because I’d be crushing it.”

Opening bands aren’t given enough credit. Even more so, the bassists of opening bands aren’t given enough credit. The touring bassist of Cayucas—who I didn’t catch the name of—is so skilled and extraordinary: he could weave in and out of working with the drums and guitar while still being able to throw in solos flawlessly.

During the wait for the headliner, Surfer Blood, the crowd had abandoned the gap between themselves and the stage. The band appeared and began without introduction; the cheerful melody joint with understated, gloomy lyrics and monotone vocals (and occasional shouting) is why people love Surfer Blood. The steady backbeat of the drums was mesmerizing. While Surfer Blood has a calm stoicism vibe, it’s clear that they enjoy being on stage and performing.

The crowd was much more energetic and loud after Surfer Blood took to the stage. I don’t go to many “mellow” rock shows, but it was interesting to see how some of the patrons danced as if it were a punk show instead of a chill California-sound show.

At the end of the night the two bands combined on stage and performed three covers. They all randomly interchanged their instruments between songs so everyone got a turn, but since it was Cayucas last show they got more time. Both bands seemed to have a ton of fun and the crowd did even more so.

During the last song, many of the teens in the audience went onstage and danced with the band. My friend and I left quickly into the cold night as we discussed heathen youth and came back home to Albuquerque.

V.24 No.10 | 3/5/2015
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Crib Notes

Crib Notes: March 5, 2015

What do you know about last week’s Albuquerque and New Mexico news? Test your recall with the Alibi pop quiz.
V.22 No.34 | 8/22/2013
The Spectacular Now

Film Review

The Spectacular Now

Brutally honest high school romance throws cliché under the bus

Dark, deeply felt teenage dramedy (with a heavy emphasis on the “dram” and only faint dustings of “edy”) stands firm as a brutally honest assessment of childhood’s waning days.
V.22 No.24 | 6/13/2013
http://www.mlkmc.com/

Contests

Enter MLK’s 23rd annual essay scholarship competition.

(High school students only)

The Martin Luther King Jr Multicultural Council has announced that is accepting applications for its 23rd annual essay scholarship competition.

The scholarships are $1,000 each and will be awarded to New Mexico 2013 -14 high school seniors. Using one of many images provided, applicants will write a 500-word essay that details their personal experience in relationship to Dr. King's life, his actions or ideals.

Those selected will be honored Monday, January 20, 2014, during the Council's 24th annual celebration. Last year the Council awarded 28 New Mexico students with scholarships.

All completed application packets must be submitted by mail to P.O. Box 40306, Albuquerque, NM 87196 no later than Sept. 9, 2013. For more information, contact Jewel Hall at 505-994-2335 or JCyrus1@aol.com or visit www.mlkmc.com

V.22 No.17 |

News

The Daily Word in Mobile explosions, Justin Bieber's alleged pot bust and Santa Fe's Gay Marriage Resolution

The Daily Word

Missing Brown student's body has been found.

Two fuel barges light up the Mobile River in Alabama.

So, TMZ apparently got the first wind on Justin Bieber's alleged pot bust, but this is still a developing story, people.

Grants High School students aim to get teacher to resign after they say he ignored a student who suffered a miscarriage in the hallway.

Gay marriage resolution passed!

Apparently Steve Kush did not know people could read his Twitter and Facebook comments.

Impostor Seattle nurse stole meds from patients' IVs. ... What is the world coming to?

V.22 No.16 |

news

Onward and inward

“Look toward the future.” This saying has been engraved in my mind since ... well, since the beginning. I’ve been told by my parents, teachers, advisors, bosses, nearly everyone to strive for what’s ahead, to keep on pushing forward. I realize this is a common theme in society. I’m sure most people have had at least a few anxiety attacks in the middle of the night concerning that overbearing word: “future”.

I’ll admit I’m slightly terrified by its presence. However, my perspective is shifting. I graduate from high school next month and suddenly, the world seems to be spinning multitudes faster than it used to. What happened to barely keeping my eyes open in first-period calculus? Or lugging around a backpack that felt like it was full of anvils? Now, I’m being thrown a diploma and told to go off into the real world, leaving this part of my life behind. Granted, graduating from high school is an accomplishment I’m proud of and while I had a great time overall, I cannot wait to throw my cap in the air while ironically performing a “High School Musical” signature jump. In the grand spectrum, these past four years account for a minuscule portion of my life. That isn’t to say they weren’t important, but there is so much more to experience and learn outside of the state-required curriculum.

But then here it comes again: the future spurning an existential crisis on my exhausted brain. Between worrying about what college will be like to what sort of chips to buy for my graduation party, my head is filled to the brim with anticipating the undeniable future. Perhaps the most frightening part is that in approximately four months, I will be moving over 2000 miles away to Boston.

That single fact awoke an urge to stop focusing primarily on the future and to really enjoy what I have right now. While moving and running toward reality is exciting, I also know I have to make an effort to really soak up all that’s around me right now. Boston will present me with some amazing adventures, but what about the adventures that are yet to be had here?

So, Alibi reader, welcome to “Blair rediscovers ABQ” (I’m sure I’ll come up with a catchier title later). Given the opportunity to blog for the Alibi, I hope to not only find new things about this beloved desert city that I never knew existed, but also let you know about them. This place has so much to offer and before I leave, I want to be able to say, “I know Albuquerque,” and share my newfound knowledge. Before Boston, diplomas, packing all my stuff into not-so-neat little boxes; before my life turns upside down, I want to explore my home to the absolute fullest during the last summer I have the privilege to call it that.

Thus begins the Albuquerque adventures. Next stop: Food trucks.

V.20 No.35 | 9/1/2011

Aural Fixation

Higher Learning

A mix of songs with academic themes

Autumn is nigh, and with the turning season come books and classrooms and new ideas and pocket protectors. Much music on the topic of school has to do with the rebellion against it, lust, alienation or nostalgia. Here’s a seasonal mix—most of the rock and roll or punk persuasion (sorry, no Van Halen)—to put you in the mood for education, be your participation willing or begrudging.
V.20 No.21 | 5/26/2011

news

The Daily Word with fights, Chihuahuas and Lady Gaga

The Daily Word

Serbian general accused of massacring 8,000 Muslims has been captured.

Patriot Act expires tonight at midnight—and Congress is rushing to renew it.

Cibola student taken to the hospital after a fight leads to broken facial bones and seizures.

Errant golf ball kills Chihuahua.

Gov. Martinez ditches her own No. 2 and sits nonchalantly near Heather Wilson.

Growers’ markets open today in Nob Hill and Downtown.

PayPal co-founder will pay college students $100,000 to drop out of college and start companies.

Parents won’t announce baby’s sex.

Maui Time ordered by police to turn over users’ IP addresses.

Supreme Court upholds Arizona law that punishes employers who hire undocumented immigrants.

The Isotopes’ policy on booze. (Not unlike most policies on booze.)

Legislators sue guv over vetoes.

Lost pyramids spotted from space.

The ADHD of Lady Gaga.

V.20 No.19 | 5/12/2011
The Sunday, May 1 rally in Clovis, N.M.
Courtesy of Albuquerque Pride President Jesse Lopez

news

Student writes about LGBT rights in Clovis

Clovis High School’s Purple Press was unable to run editor James Walker’s report about another student trying to start a Gay-Straight Alliance. So the Alibi published Walker’s story online.

Steven De Los Santos turned in an application for the club in late February, according to Walker’s story. The Alliance was approved, but then Principal Wayne Marshall changed his mind and decided to send the request along to the superintendent.

The Clovis School Board voted to ban all non-curricular clubs from meeting on campus during school hours or using school resources to spread the word about meetings.

The American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico got involved and demanded the Gay-Straight Alliance be approved—even as a non-curricular club. Albuquerque Pride, the state’s largest LGBT organization, drove down to Clovis to hold a demonstration. Last week, the Alliance was given the green light.

Student editor Walker’s article also addresses other LGBT concerns in Clovis.

V.20 No.18 | 5/5/2011
Steven De Los Santos addresses a crowd of demonstrators from around the state who gathered in Clovis, N.M., on Sunday, May 1.
Courtesy of Jesse Lopez

Web Feature

Clovis’ LGBT Struggle

Students seek Gay-Straight Alliance

Starting a new club at Clovis High School is usually a routine process: Fill out forms, get approval from the administration, find members and establish meetings. All of this seemed to be going well for Steven De Los Santos, who spearheaded a Gay-Straight Alliance at Clovis High School—until administration postponed approval.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

Courtesy of Jesse Lopez

News Bite

Pride Flag Flies in Clovis

Demonstrators from around the state gathered on a cold, windy afternoon in Clovis, N.M., to show support for LGBT student rights.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.20 No.14 |

news

The Daily Word: Government shutdown, another earthquake,

The Daily Word

APD Officer Levi Chavez may be indicted. His wife died in 2007, and though it was considered a suicide, friends and family didn't believe it, according to a wrongful death lawsuit.

Student says Cibola told her: You're either a boy or a girl, so no pantsuit at graduation.

See video of a San Juan County sheriff's deputy beating a guy in the head with his flashlight.

Another quake hits Japan.

President Obama says there won't be a government shutdown.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says it's going to happen.

What it would mean to you.

If the government does shut down, Congress will still be paid as usual.

The Recording Academy will no longer offer a Grammy for Native American music.

Land Comish Powell returned White Peak to the nature-loving and -hunting public.

16 campus security officers (called "narcs" at my ABQ high school) were slashed from the APS budget.

Read an interview with the journalist who was captured and then released in Libya.

Can we blame Britain for everything?

Alec Baldwin says "30 Rock" ends next year.

A history of stoner movies.