history


V.26 No.6 | 02/09/2017

Event Horizon

Epicenter to Now

Friday, Feb 17: The Sun, the Moon and Chaco Canyon

Anna Sofaer and Rob Weiner discuss new evidence of the historical desert landscape that inspired Mesoamericans' remarkable cosmographic expressions of monumental architecture and roads.
V.26 No.5 | 02/02/2017
African Drumming
Mary Teresa Herrera

Event Horizon

The Beat of Time

Saturday, Feb 4: A Journey Through Black Music

Performances from WaMba African Drummers, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Inspirational Choir, dancer Trey "Vision" Pickett and vocalists Tracey Whitney, Zenobia Conkerite and Raven Rutherford.
V.26 No.3 | 01/19/2017
KiMo Theater courtesy of Karen Blaha
/ Creative Commons

Anniversary Interview

Less of an Interview, More of a Love Letter

What do Alfred Hitchcock, Bryan Cranston, The Nutcracker and Finding Nemo have in common? The KiMo! Albuquerque's premier historical theater is listed on the US National Register of Historic Places and N.M. State Register of Cultural Properties. It's also an Albuquerque Historic Landmark.

The KiMo was created by immigrant Oreste Bachechi (the entrepreneur and owner of the Bachechi Open Space property) and designed by Carl Boller of the Boller Brothers architecture firm, based in Kansas City, Mo. Erected in 1927 (opening on Sept. 19, 1927), with an Art Deco-Pueblo Revival Style, the KiMo was named after the Tewa word for mountain lion as suggested by the Isleta Pueblo governor at the time, Pablo Abeita. One of the most well-known and intriguing stories about the KiMo is the explosion of 1951: a terrible accident resulting in the death of one child who is now said to haunt the building. The staff tends to the spirit of the boy, Bobby Darnall, by leaving him gifts and offerings—like toys and candy—in the backstage stairwell.

The theater became decrepit after a fire in the 1960s and was meant to be destroyed until a bond passed by voters in Albuquerque in 1977, allowing the city to purchase the building and renovate the space. Now it serves the community as one of the paramount cultural centers of the city.

The celebration of the 90th anniversary for the building begins at 7pm on Friday, Jan. 27, with author Douglas Preston discussing his novel. The Lost City of the Monkey God is about the legend of a 500-year-old cursed, city, where anyone who enters dies. For a full list of 90th anniversary events, continue to follow the KiMo event calendar and visit www.kimotickets.com.

V.25 No.48 | 12/01/2016

Event Horizon

“The bigger the crime, the greater forgiveness.”

Friday, Dec 9: Simon Gronowski

Hear the harrowing expierence of the Belgian holocaust survivor and jazz pianist followed by a performance and a question and answer session.
V.25 No.45 | 11/10/2016

Event Horizon

Hearing the Light

Thursday, Nov 17: Musicology Colloquium Series: Music in Images in the Arts of New Spain

Dr. Ray Hernández-Durán explores religious music from the 16th century through an examination of mission design, manuscript illuminations and secular music from the 18th century.
V.25 No.44 | 11/03/2016
Private Universe: Galaxy #9
Courtesy of Richard Levy Gallery

Anniversary Interview

Featuring Richard Levy Gallery

To celebrate our 25th year properly here at the Weekly Alibi, we're conducting a series of interviews with local businesses and institutions that we've grown with and that have contributed to the growth of our wonderful city.

For our first interview, Calendars Editor Megan Reneau met up with Richard Levy and Vivette Hunt of the renowned contemporary Richard Levy Gallery located at 514 Central SWto ask them a few questions about their 25 years Downtown, the community, art and how it all intersects.


Alibi: What brought you to Albuquerque?

Richard: I went to school in San Francisco for a couple years and then transferred to UNM. I took a couple years worth of English and then decided to switch to art because I grew up in a house with parents who are collectors, so it was a natural transition for me.

That led to becoming a photographer. And I hook rugs … it's a very Northeastern, little old lady sport. It takes me about a year to make a rug. After UNM I opened an antique store … by the Guild. I was attracted to the idea—to graphics of different kinds—so I sold antique photographs, I used to buy old Vogue magazines from the '20s when they were silk screened and made in Paris. By the end of that store, I was selling silk screens and sort of limited edition posters by Warhol, Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, you know, all the classics ...

Vivette: Richard's good at finding things.

Richard: Anything. I can find a source for anything. So in the antique business and in this business, it's a good skill to have.

Alibi: How has Downtown changed in the last 25 years?

Richard Levy: I was going to buy the building and not remodel it but someone else was bidding on the building, as well—my home contractor. He just happened to be working on our house at the same time as all this was going on. I called him and told him I was buying this building and there was silence at the other end. His wife suggested that we buy it together and add a second story.

Alibi: So it's changed a lot.

Richard: Yeah. At the time [JC] Penny's was Downtown but they were leaving.

This was an architecture firm [in the building RLG occupies] and they were just leaving, as well, I mean—mostly people were leaving Downtown then—so I saw that as an opportunity to buy a building at the right moment. I intended to start as a print gallery by appointment only.

Vivette: And that came out of Richard being a publisher.

Richard: I was familiar with what Tamarind was publishing. I knew some other publishers in San Francisco—I knew I could buy their prints and resell them. There was huge demand in those days. People would publish print editions and they would be sold out in a minute. So I started that way, just buying prints and reselling them in very short order.

Alibi: What's your process for collecting the art that will be featured?

Vivette: We're constantly feeling for visual information. If we like something or if we see how it would maybe fit into a project—for example, our next exhibition is snow flakes, it's going to be called “Let it Snow.” We'll fill the gallery with snowflake imagery, so knowing that that's happening, we start scanning. And, you know, Richard's been doing his internet sleuthing [laughs], so it happens in different ways. We have projects in mind, sort of peripherally on our radar, maybe a year or two out once we encounter different types of art. This exhibition is not a great example because this is a celebration of 25 years and celebrating 25 years, you bring a lot of information together.

Richard: Yeah, this exhibition isn’t an example because this is all over the place. What we do is very curated.

Alibi: How does the theme of this relate to the charity We Are This City that you guys are working with?

Vivette: We really wanted to make this exhibition feel more like a community celebration because it’s about the gallery being Downtown for 25 years, so it was important for us to include the artists that we represent today. Our program is a mix of things that Richard finds that we resale blended with artists that we actually work with and consign our art from, so we are career building but we are also making secondary sales.

This show does also reflect that balance in our program. When we go to an art fair, generally a booth presentation will include secondary market and artists that we’re directly working with so we bring them together. We wanted that balance to be reflected in the exhibition well. And Richard is a collector, so we sort of wanted to put a little bit of that aspect of his personality in—the baseballs, that’s a collection of his, so it’s sort of bringing different components that all sort of fit with it being a community celebration.

We’d been looking for the right partner—Richard and I have been talking about this for a while—we finalized that partnership in May or June. We Are This City was interesting to us because of their arts and cultural overlap, but it’s very different: It's very millennial-based. It seemed like a good fit for us, bringing our two networks together.

Alibi: Has changing media impacted your business?

Richard: Oh totally. When I first started—I mean, there were computers—but everything was very old fashioned. To get things printed, you had to go to the print shop and they would have to have things photographed—you didn’t bring them files. Nobody did anything over the internet because most people barely had AOL.

Vivette: When I got here in 2000—even at that time—we'd get a piece of art in, we’d have to load it up in the truck and take it to the photographer and the photographer would photograph it, we would get slides then get the slides digitized... But even at that time, a very small percentage of our collectors were actually looking at art online even though that was for putting it on the website. We weren’t really sending a lot of images. Now most of our sales are online.

Richard: That didn’t happen till a couple years ago.

Vivette: Yeah, that’s a trend that’s really solidified in the last five years.

Richard: But we still go to a lot of fairs. We show up with a bunch of crates and we fill a 20x24-foot space in New York or wherever, Dallas, Seattle or Miami—they’re all destination cities at the right time of year. And we see 10,000, 15-, 20-, 25,000 people at those.

Alibi: That’s a lot.

Richard: Those are people who are committed to art in some way. People still need people to look at the artwork and see what the painting’s like. You can’t really understand paintings online, the brush strokes, you know it's...

Alibi: Yeah, it’s a completely different thing seeing it in person. But it sounds like changing media has impacted your business a lot, has that change affected the art that you've received or that you’re interested in?

Richard: It’s certainly changed photography. It’s much easier to print out photographs and everything photography became digital, but as far as painting and prints, prints have changed too because it’s—

Vivette: Open to the digital world. Some painters that use technology to expand their toolset, like Beau Carey is a very traditional painter but, that being said, when I see this landscape painting here on the wall (Mt. Analogue, 2016), I can’t help but think it’s somehow influenced by looking at digital information.

Richard: But that’s just the collective unconscious. That's everybody being online and looking at stuff. But when it comes down to painting, you still have to paint.

Vivette: Yeah, you still have to pick up the brush. It's just the way you're conceptually connecting the dots. On the other side, we have a painter that we represent that has modified a CNC router which is driven by software. They generally cut special shapes but he modified it and put a robotic arm so it does an individual paint drop application and he writes the software to tell it what to do. So I mean, he's painting but he's not picking up a brush ... it's definitely a creative process.

Alibi: Why is the art scene so different from Santa Fe?

Vivette: Albuquerque is a much more affordable place to live and allows a creative community of many, many different income brackets to be established here. Santa Fe is a little priced out and not accessible to such a diverse group of people.

Richard: The Santa Fe market really started with the more traditional New Mexican, classic kind of images that were more expensive and a little more traditional—

Vivette: And a little more conservative. There’s more room for experimentation here with the universities pushing intellectual, conceptual and—again—economic boundaries. If you're not under the gun to pay huge overhead on your studio space, you can afford to take a few more risks. It allows room to be more experimental.

Alibi: Has the Alibi influenced the art scene in Albuquerque?

Vivette: Yeah, it’s helped get people to events.

Richard: Yeah, and when they started and when we started, we used to do art walks. The city arts organization did that. The city was divided into three or four sectors so the Northeast Heights had one and Downtown and the University area together had one and the Valley had one. I think that was it. And we used to do them regularly. Everybody in the area would be open on a certain day, and we would take out ads together and that was in the calendar section and that’s how people knew about that stuff.

V.25 No.31 | 08/04/2016

Event Horizon

First Steps

Saturday, Aug 13: Estevan the Black: Journey into the Unknown

Learn about the first European to set foot in what is now the states of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.
V.25 No.29 | 07/21/2016

Event Horizon

Viva Frida, Colorful Art Goddess

Saturday, Jul 30: 6th Annual Frida Fiesta

Celebrate the life of iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo with live music, a Frida Parade and a Frida birthday cake.
V.25 No.26 | 06/30/2016
Pixabay

Event Horizon

Water Under the Bridge

Saturday, Jul 9: Centennial Nights: A River Thirsting for Itself

Learn about the history of water, agriculture, environment and politics surrounding the Rio Grande.
V.25 No.24 | 06/16/2016

News

The Daily Word in poverty, gravitational waves and messing with scammers

The Daily Word

This is how to combat extremists in the Islamic State.

An MDC prisoner escaped from a transport van in Downtown.

Black holes and gravitational waves, dude.

The Dog Head Fire is now 61% contained.

Today in history.

This dude is messing with the minds of email scammers.

He even got this scammer to write in code!

And he attempted to get a free toaster out of the scam.

On top of sickening athletes with filthy water, here's another reason why the Rio 2016 Olympics are bad news.

About one in seven people in America is living in poverty.

V.25 No.23 | 06/09/2016

News

The Daily Word in the Senate Filibuster, Gun Control and the Dog Head Fire

The Daily Word

Looks like two senators are finally taking a stand on gun control in a "filibuster-style blockade."

You can watch it live right now!

In Florida, it's easier to get a gun than solar panels, a driver's license, an abortion, an exotic pet...

The Dog Head Fire is burning without containment.

A badass Twitter user is calling out politicians who are "praying for Orlando" but refuse to support gun control laws.

Check out this heroic Rio Rancho teen.

Look back at the history of the gun control debate.

A state worker started a relationship with Nehemiah Griego.

What does a map of a hallucination look like?

This is the first mammal to go extinct from global warming.

Did you know noise has color?

V.25 No.19 | 05/12/2016

Event Horizon

May the Forest be with You

Sunday, May 22: Hiking to History

Author Robert Juyan reviews his newest book.
V.25 No.17 | 04/28/2016

The Daily Word in Republicans, Harry Potter and Vaginas

The Daily Word

uz tha debil” –John Boehner to Ted Cruz

I really enjoy Tina Fey but I don't understand how people can just call her perfect when she relies on socially acceptable racism so much.

And this is exactly why, out of all the Harry Potter films, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince is my favorite.

Kesha is recording again!

The next Vice President could be Tom Perez.

VAGINA, VAGINA, VAGINA!

Another Doctors Without Borders hospital has been attacked.

This ancient treat fucks eeeeeverything up.

Former House Speaker and life-long sex offender Dennis Hastert has been sentenced to just 15 months in prison.

V.25 No.14 | 04/07/2016
via compfight

Event Horizon

¡Ay, caramba!

Saturday, Apr 16: Fiestas de Albuquerque

Enjoy the history and traditions of Albuquerque with live entertainment, artists, food, shopping, and free children's activities.
V.25 No.9 | 03/03/2016
compfight.com

Event Horizon

Workin' Women

Thursday, Mar 10: Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound

Filmmaker Katrina Parks and writer Carolyn Meyer share stories and history regarding the beginning of the all female American work forces in the US.