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V.25 No.5 | 02/04/2016
via arc-a.org

Sustainable Local Agriculture at Casa San Ysidro

On Saturday, February 13 at 1:30pm the public is invited to a free program,
"Food, Farms, Friends," explaining the new partnership between three valued community organizations—NM Land Conservancy, the ARCA and Casa San Ysidro—designed to promote sustainable local agriculture.

This year, ARCA will commence farming the nearly two acre Heritage Field at Casa San Ysidro, fulfilling the Museum's intent to preserve New Mexican heritage by allowing the Museum to keep the Heritage Field agriculturally productive and expand Casa San Ysidro's educational programming and community involvement to include local agriculture.

The program is co-hosted by the Corrales Historical Society and will be held in the Old Church located across the street from Casa San Ysidro: The Gutierrez/Minge House (973 Old Church, Corrales) From 1pm-4pm. Free open house tours and blacksmithing demonstrations at the historic Casa San Ysidro. The public is invited to learn more about these three organizations and explore the history of agriculture in the Rio Abajo area of New Mexico.

For more information about this program and the historic Casa San Ysidro, visit cabq.gov/casasanysidro.

V.25 No.3 | 01/21/2016
A view from the heights
Courtesy of the author

Creative Non-Fiction

Number Eleven

By August March [ Wed Jan 20 2016 9:45 PM ]

There is something wrong with waiting for the Sun-Tran bus number eleven at seven in the morning thought Charlie Jones as he dragged upon a Camel straight and adjusted the band on his watch. A couple of pigeons wandered over and he threw them each ample quantities of the three-day-old Allsups burrito buried in his coat pocket.

Jones was wearing stuff from his father's closet. There was something about that woolen cowboy-style suit jacket and the bolo tie—a turquoise and coral affair that depicted the Zuni Sun God—that made Charlie itchy and paranoid.

—Someone else wore this stuff around Burque thirty years ago and now it's my turn, he mumbled to the small birds.

The Lomas bus followed a wide path made from concrete and dinosaur juice and ended up on the edge of the mountains, a place nearby to Charlie's destination. On board, Jones read through his notes for the day. Once in a while, he looked out the window. The bus drove through places that used to be open range, filled with sage and snakes and the ruins of cars that never made it to Califas.

—So Tony y la familia settled in Barelas, a passenger across the aisle gravely intoned.

Charlie got out of the bus after it crossed Juan Tabo and walked the rest of the way to the high school. The place was mostly painted purple. There were also about three hundred or so depictions of lions—some sculptural—saturating the campus with an air of vibrancy, ferocity.

—The school mascot left its spoor everywhere, Jones whispered reverently.

As Charlie marched through the administrator’s area on the way to his classroom, he was mistaken for a student by the new community resource officer, a man who had just moved to Burque from New Jersey—looking for something he just knew was hidden somewhere in the sprawling western lands. His name was Dwight.

Jones produced his faculty ID. He gave the old man a solemn pat on the back, thanking him for his vigilance and incomparable public service. The two men wandered away from the other satisfied and confident about their ability to communicate with individuals from outside their respective subcultures.

It was still early; Charlie stopped by the teacher's lounge. He had a Sony Walkman in his bag. Jones was about to activate side two of the new Radiohead album when Bob Baca, the biology teacher appeared. Bob began chatting about invertebrates in a very excited tone and then with no small amount of verbal craft segued loquaciously and nearly seamlessly into a diatribe about the wonders of religion.

—A single dude like you ought to give church a try, said the biology teacher, inducing a sense of mock frenzy in Charlie’s fingers, which were unable to flip the cassette tape over at that precise moment due to an overwhelming sense of ennui in the rest of his body.

He reached his room, unlocked the door and activated the switch on the wall. Lights fluttered to life and computers booted. Students began to wander in. One of them asked Charlie if it was true that he was a communist and let his summer school students read Chairman Mao's little red book last year. Charlie waved off the question and made sure he stood with his hand over heart when they played the Star Spangled banner over the intercom that morning.

Jones gave a lesson about how technology was influencing rock music. One of his students, Zach, jumped out of his seat near the end of the talk, and began belting out "Destination Anywhere," by Bon Jovi while gesturing madly at the students in the back of the room. After a couple of verses, he retreated—funky, outrageous and parade-style through the classroom door, never seen again.

During the scheduled lunch break, Charlie sat behind his desk and played Oregon Trail on the Apple IIe. Afterward he spent the afternoon discussing a relatively new thing called the world wide web with a group of final-year students who he believed were probably going to end up designing nuclear weapons or implementing carnivorous global marketing strategies.

On the way out to the bus stop at the end of the day, he nearly tripped over Bob Baca. Jones was looking down, trying to find the rewind button on his music player. Just as he slid awkwardly past Baca, the tape inside the machine reset itself. A recording of Thom Yorke's voice began telling all about a dystopian world—filled with crash survivors and characters right out of Shakespeare—that was just around the corner.

—Fitter, happier, more productive, the voice on recording said with the informative precision of machines.

Charlie cranked up the volume, flashed Baca the peace sign and crossed the street. He walked to the bench where a bus was always waiting and listened.

V.25 No.2 | 01/14/2016

Creative Non-Fiction

From the Heights

By August March [ Wed Jan 13 2016 9:40 PM ]
A glimpse of 1979
V.24 No.53 | 12/31/2015
Photo by Beshr Abdulhadi • flickr.com/beshro

Event Horizon

One City, Many People

Saturday, Jan 9: People Create Cities: The Lebanese/Syrian Community

By Taylor Grabowsky [ Thu Jan 7 2016 10:30 AM ]
Learn about the Syrian and Lebanese people who helped create Albuquerque.
Google Earth icon Map Icon
V.24 No.44 | 10/29/2015

Podcast Recommendation: Lore

"Lore" aims for the heart of the world's creepiest folklore

The soft voice of Aaron Mahnke may strike the listeners of his podcast, Lore, as oddly disconcerting. Whether Mahnke is discussing axe-weilding murders in the deep south or the creeping monsters of New England's coastline, what is a mainstay of the broadcast is the question, "what is the implication of this story?"

Listen to a few episodes in anticipation of Halloween, but as Mahnke himself tweeted earlier this week, "Let’s remember: 'Lore' isn’t a 'scary story' podcast. It’s a narrative history podcast about the roots of common superstition & folklore." There's much more to these stories than a thrill; they offer a creative exploration of history lived by everyday people, whose lives were touched by traditions and beliefs with mysterious origins and powerful implications.

Listen to Lore here.

V.24 No.40 | 10/01/2015
flickr.com/people/iluvcocacola/

Event Horizon

History's Overlooked Spaces

Saturday, Oct 10: Outhouses: Underrated Icons of New Mexico History

By Maggie Grimason [ Fri Oct 9 2015 12:00 PM ]
Learn about how outhouses were introduced to New Mexico, their essential role in communities across the state and their continued presence as historical artifacts.
Google Earth icon Map Icon
V.24 No.28 | 7/9/2015

news

The Daily Word in George

By Robert Maestas [ Wed Sep 9 2015 11:46 AM ]
The Daily Word

Pros & Cons of CGI.

A reflection of our time.

CRY FOR ME!

NASA the hedgehog.

Computerman ( or the Expected Ignorance of Virture )

Hedy Lamarr’s Great Escape.

Master Penman.

The power of Venus.

Secrets of the US dollar.

George.

V.24 No.36 | 9/3/2015

news

The Daily Word: Off the Grid

By Robert Maestas [ Thu Aug 27 2015 12:37 PM ]
The Daily Word

Tiny giants.

Gateway to Hell.

Future Schtuff.

Even more future schtuff!

Birdman.

Oh, the feels.

Responsible Advertising?

Guardian of the Galaxy.

Who needs intelligence when you have this?

Off the grid.

V.24 No.28 | 7/9/2015

news

The Daily Word: Operation Counterfeit, The Obama Scheme

By Robert Maestas [ Wed Jul 15 2015 12:24 PM ]
The Daily Word

obama strikes again.

a dream that became reality, and spread through the stars.

steam bugs.

the future starts now.

i’ll have my history medium rare, please.

is the real you, uoy?

ec= happiness(squared)

fashion kills.

the heart is a beating drum.

the persistance of alice.

V.24 No.25 | 6/18/2015

news

The Daily Word: art schtuff

By Robert Maestas [ Wed Jun 17 2015 2:29 PM ]
The Daily Word

the past, now in glorious technicolor!

who needs a brush?

$9 computer

dangerdust

dissect your childhood

cut it out

damn girl, are you an ancient philosophical text? because I’m learning a lot about myself and the universe from looking at you

jesus, does anyone draw anything anymore?

I guess not.

show offs

handi-art-able

V.24 No.15 | 4/9/2015

Book Review

The Rebel, the Heart and the Liar

Review by Renée Chavez

When the Doves Disappeared

Nuanced characters enrich this lush story of human connection between a willfully ignorant woman and her Nazi lover.
V.24 No.14 | 4/2/2015

Book Review

Flaws and All

Boris Johnson’s The Churchill Factor personalizes a legend

Review by Randyn Charles Bartholomew

The Churchill Factor: How One Man Made History

Former journalist and London mayor Boris Johnson’s vigorous, readable take reveals the legend for what he was—human, flawed and interesting as hell.
V.24 No.13 | 3/26/2015
Ari LeVaux

Flash in the Pan

Crypto-Cuisine

By Ari LeVaux
Ari LeVaux pays homage to a forgotten people with this recipe that blends Jewish and Southwestern cuisine.
V.24 No.12 | 3/19/2015

Get Lit

No Simple Highway explores Dead mythology

By August March
Peter Richardson’s new cultural history of the Grateful Dead, No Simple Highway, breathes nuance into an iconic chronicle of American subcultural royalty.
V.24 No.8 | 2/19/2015

Get Lit

Read Between the Lines

And meet these authors in the flesh

Report like a girl

Your to-be-read pile just got bigger. Whether you love history, fiction, sports or science, meet these authors touring the 505.
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