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V.24 No.27 | 7/2/2015
Paul Bostaph

Interview

Slayer of Time

Legendary drummer rejoins band, rocks the fuck out

By August March
August March talks to a Paul Bostaph about his return to Slayer.
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.24 No.25 | 6/18/2015
Space Garbage Man
Robert Maestas

Interview

The People in Your Neighborhood

Dr. Moriba Jah, Space Garbage Man

By Renée Chavez
Dr. Moriba Jah tracks and monitors space debris at Kirtland Air Force Base.
V.24 No.24 | 6/11/2015
Ellen Harry and Brianna Stallings

Feature

A New Hope

Ellen Harry talks about her experience being out and trans*

By M. Brianna Stallings
Ellen Harry speaks with Brianna Stallings about the clarity of HRT, the stickiness of terminology surrounding the trans* experience, how her coming out has been received and her hopes for the future.
V.24 No.22 | 5/28/2015
Snake Lady
Robert Maestas; photo by Jeff Bidewell

Feature Interview

Dr. Anne Key

Occupation: Former High Priestess

By Renee Chavez
Renee Chavez interviews Dr. Anne Key, former High Priestess
V.24 No.21 | 05/21/2015
Mandee Johnson

arts

Comedy Matters

Chris Thayer on dry humor and being in the moment

By Genevieve Mueller [ Tue May 26 2015 1:32 PM ]

I think every comedian has that moment when they watch a stand-up set from a particular comic and think, “This is my life now.” “I always had an interest in comedy when I was growing up, but I never thought of it as something I could or would do,” says comedian Chris Thayer. “When I was 18, I heard David Cross' album Shut Up You Fucking Baby!, which was conversational in a way that made me think that maybe I could do stand-up too.” Thayer, who will be at The Guild (3405 Central Avenue NE) on June 1, moved to San Francisco, a city that has spawned such comedy legends as Robin Williams at Margaret Cho, at the age of nineteen but waited three whole years before trying comedy. He finally sat down one night and began to write; a week later he did an open mic, and “within a year I had done over 200 sets,” says Thayer. “Now I’ve been doing comedy for seven years.”

It’s this dedication that got him a writing gig on the Pete Holmes show. Thayer has a dry sense of humor and often talks about his life on stage. His uncompromising style is reflected in his ideas on comedy. “The thing that terrified me most when I started performing was the fear that an audience would hate me,” says Thayer. With time this slowly abated and Thayer began to focus more on what he thought was funny rather than appealing to any given crowd. “I'd like as many people as possible to like me without having to compromise myself or what I think is funny. I would drive myself crazy if I were trying to change my stuff to get 100% of people to love me, so if only maybe 67% of people are into me, I'm totally okay with that,” says Thayer. “Not sure if that number sounds too high or too low. I'm trying to be modest without sounding unambitious.”

It’s not an unwavering ambition though. Thayer sees comedy as something that needs to avoid stagnation. “My favorite parts of performing are the times when I'm present enough and comfortable enough to try or add new stuff,” says Thayer. “I enjoy doing my material that I've been working on, but there's always a danger of feeling like you're on autopilot when you're doing stuff that you've memorized and said hundreds of times before. Thinking of new stuff for old jokes or trying to talk out new bits lets me know that I'm engaged in the moment and makes it fun for me.” Thayer has a way of balancing his strong and steadfast ideas on comedy with being open and present in the moment so he can engage with the live audience. “I want the audience to think, ‘Wow that guy is really funny despite being boringly sincere in interviews.’”

Chris Thayer: No One Asked for this Tour
The Guild (3405 Central Avenue NE)
Monday June 1 10:30 pm $5
guildcinema.com

V.24 No.21 | 5/21/2015
Kimo Licious
COURTESY OF ARTIST

Music History

An Interview with Kimo, Pt. II

By August March
Kimo Licious tells historian August March more about the Burque music scene.
V.24 No.20 | 05/14/2015

arts

David Koechner on satire, human flaws and story telling

By Genevieve Mueller [ Tue May 19 2015 11:16 AM ]

The Greeks had it right. Socrates searched for real knowledge untainted by pride, and Plato was so done with irrational humanity he just wanted to crawl out of a cave and find a friend. It’s been 2,400 years since the fall of Ancient Greece and we’re all still tragically surprised we’re flawed and yet there’s something hilarious about that. “I start with a flaw like narcissism,” says comedian David Koechner about his creative process. “We all have narcissistic tendencies, but there are some who are fully narcissistic. We all are afraid of things at times, but there are some who live their life in fear. I look at that and think, That’s annoying, so I’ll make fun of it.” Koechner, who performs at Santa Ana Star Casino (54 Jemez Dam Rd., Bernalillo) on Thursday, May 21, satirizes these defective human tendencies through rich and outlandish characters.

Initially a political science major, in his third year at university he visited a friend in Chicago, watched a show at Second City, decided then he wanted to be a comedian and never looked back. “Once I decided this was what I wanted to do, I never had any doubts,” says Koechner. “I know that’s not the sexy answer. I love show business and doing comedy. I have a proclivity for it. If I could build things I would do that. If I was smart I would do that.” Koechner looks at comedy as his vocation, and it’s the small things about it that draws him to perform. “The best part is knowing that I was successful at something. My experiment worked. Something I created worked.”

Part observational humor and part hyperbolic storytelling, his shows are an experiment in human behavior. “I start from a small piece of behavior I notice. Something universal. Something we all share but an individual might live by,” says Koechner, “and then I blow up that aspect of my personality and create a character.” Admittedly, this process seems to be second nature to Koechner. “For whatever reason I’m able to access those parts of me. It's like algebra for me. I got the formula, and I can just keep plugging in numbers and getting results."

Known best for playing Champ Kind in the Anchorman movies, Koechner puts a lot of himself into his roles. “Describing your act is kind of like describing your personality. I’m loud and my comedy is loud,” says Koechner. “My comedy is wet, as opposed to dry.” It’s Sophocles’ Greek tragedy intersected with jokes, but with fewer people dying. Koechner has the rare ability to be silly and bombastic but maintain an underlying satirical tone that is smart and cutting. “It all has a satirical center,” says Koechner. “We all have flaws. We all have to deal with institutions. Whether it’s a child or a parent or a school, or work, government, church—everything is an institution that we have to interact with. I think ‘What are the rules of that behavior?’ And then I break them.”

David Koechner
The Stage at Santa Ana Star Casino
54 Jemez Dam Rd., Bernalillo
Thursday, May 21, 7 and 9:30pm
$15-$35 Ages: 21+
thestageatthestar.com

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V.24 No.20 | 5/14/2015

Feature Interview

The People in Your Neighborhood

Interviews with ordinary Burqueños

By Renée Chavez
Our new column kicks off with a tattoo artist, a music teacher and a Doctor of Oriental Medicine.
Zachary Gallegos

Feature Interview

Mars Ain’t the Kind of Place to Raise Your Kids

Part two of our interview with prospective Martian Zachary Gallegos

By Courtney Foster
New Mexico’s own prospective Martian, Zachary Gallegos, talks about his fears, his inspirations and, of course, sex in space.
V.24 No.19 | 5/7/2015
Kimo
Courtesy of artist

Music History

An Interview with Kimo, Pt. I

By August March
Resident historian August March talks ABQ history and artistic inspiration with Kimo.
V.24 No.18 | 4/30/2015
Maher navigates the political cesspool with panache.
photo courtesy of billmaher.com

Comedy Matters

Offended by the Offended

Bill Maher confronts politics, religion and the far left

By Genevieve Mueller
Bill Maher talks to Genevieve Mueller about his roots and the liberal problem of political correctness in anticipation of his May 2 appearance.
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.24 No.16 | 4/16/2015
Sleater-Kinney: (From left) Janet Weiss, Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein
Brigitte Sire

Music Interview

Re(Start) Together

An interview with Sleater-Kinney’s Carrie Brownstein

By M. Brianna Stallings
Sleater-Kinney member/“Portlandia” prime mover Carrie Brownstein talks all things S-K (including collabs with Planned Parenthood and “Bob’s Burgers”) with M. Brianna Stallings.
V.24 No.15 | 4/9/2015
Swans
Samantha Marble

Music Interview

Evian, Cowboy Hats and (Aging) Young Gods

An interview with Swans’ Michael Gira

By M. Brianna Stallings
Wherein Michael Gira talks To Be Kind, St. Vincent, peeing on tour, the Man’s Hat Shop and the Four Corners area.
View in Alibi calendar calendar
V.24 No.14 | 4/2/2015
Mars One finalist Zachary Gallegos
Courtesy of Zachary Gallegos

Interview

Martian Dreams

Mars One finalist Zachary Gallegos talks life and death on an angry red planet

By Courtney Foster
Burqueño Zachary Gallegos, in the final 100 contenders for a spot on the Mars One mission, chats about everything from scam allegations to Mars food sources.
V.24 No.11 | 3/12/2015
Dwight Loop
Courtesy of artist

Music History

An Interview with Dwight Loop, Pt. II

By August March
August March resumes a conversation about nuevomexicano aural history with electronic/experimental artist, DJ and promoter Dwight Loop.
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