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The Daily Word in apologies, bionics, slang and wrongful termination

Gary Johnson's girlie campaign poster.

Yahoo apologized to Albuquerque.

Rio Rancho wants to make it illegal to feed pigeons.

This guy is going to climb a Chicago skyscraper with a bionic leg.

Handing out razors on Halloween.

Waste the rest of your day on this enormous, UK-centric online dictionary of slang.

Absolutely no evidence PROVES there are hundreds of abominable snowmen living in Siberia.

Romney and Mormonism.

If Romney were President.

Romney on women, his faith and who he is.

The future of Fleet Street.

The Italian Captain who abandoned the Costa Concordia is suing for wrongful termination.

Scotland Yard is now calling Jimmy Saville Britain's most prolific serial sex offender.

Miguel Bloombito, fake Mayor Bloomberg Twitter account.

On this day in 1946, Robert Mapplethorpe was born.

    Sony Pictures Television / Ben Leuner
    Shameless Self-Promotion

    Alibi wins an AltWeekly Award for Sam Adams’ “Breaking Bad” arts feature!

    Three cheers for the Alibi’s very own patriot / arts editor, Sam Adams! His fascinating profile on the Albuquerque-centric AMC show “Breaking Bad”—including candid insights from actors Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul and Anna Gunn—garnered a second-place spot in the super-competitive 2012 AltWeekly Awards. Take a moment to revisit “Raising Hell in the Land of Enchantment,” then raise a glass of Sam Adams to Sam Adams.

      NEWS

      The Daily Word: APD officers rewarded for shooting citizens?; Dick Cheney lost an OEM part; a snow globe of cash; midget wrestling in the late sixties

      Police union has been giving what some are calling "bounty" to APD officers involved in shootings.

      Some guy climbed up the NY Times building.

      Just another freaky-looking, lavish-lifestyle-living, money-grubbing evangelical christian family.

      King of the road.

      Armored truck doors fly open resulting in "snow globe of cash."

      Everyone loves a good font.

      Dick Cheney has a new heart.

      Ziggy Stardust box set.

      These guys are dwarves, but they called it "midget-wrestling."

      17th century Buddha statue with secrets.

      "The parchment is hairy" and other grumpy margin notes by medieval monks.

      So I'm reading this blog about celebrity profiles by female journalists and am reminded of the great Kim Gordon LL Cool J interview.

      On this day in 1918 Howard Cosell was born.

        news

        The Daily Word in Egypt, UFOs and free rides

        Turkey-shapes-made-from-other-food competition. David Byrne entered two.

        Tavern Taxi will drive you home for free this weekend if you've had a few drinks. Good for anywhere in Bernalillo County. 999-1400.

        Black Friday shopping rage.

        Businesses struggle on Lead, and road construction through the holiday season could mean local shops won't survive.

        More UFO sightings in New Mexico than usual.

        Worst movies ever.

        Since the Republicans don't want him, ex-Gov. Gary Johnson might go Libertarian.

        Sandiago's Mexican Grill cooks up a Thanksgiving feast for foster kids and their families.

        Egyptians protest the military regime.

        Journalist talks about her assault in Egypt by riot police.

        The world's first full face transplant.

        The rogue ad man behind Buy Nothing Day and the Occupy movement.

        Changes to the Catholic mass.

        Famous people who died in 2011.

          You Are Going Down

          Alibi contributors pick up 2011 AltWeekly Awards!

          The Association of Alternative Newsweeklies announced the winners of its nationwide alt.weekly journalism contest—and three Alibi contributors locked down four awards! Here’s how they did:

          Best Food Writing (circulation under 50,000): Alibi restaurant critic and food columnist Ari LeVaux swallowed up third place. (“Le Fooding,” “An Offal Story” and “Chewing the Fat.”)

          Best Column (circulation under 50,000): Our Miss Diagnosis column, penned by family nurse practitioner Whitny Doyle, took a healthy third place. (“Seduction of a Nurse,” “Robbins Burns Rubbers” and “Life and Death on the Night Shift.”)

          • Cover Design (circulation under 50,000): Alibi graphic designer Jeff Drew hit the contest’s zenith with a first-place cover he did for Vermont’s Seven Days.

          Illustration (circulation under 50,000): Jeff also picked up third place for artwork in the Pacific Northwest Inlander.

          Well done and congratulations!

            V.20 No.29 | 7/21/2011
            So ... just slightly bigger than the   Alibi   offices.

            Film Review

            Page One: Inside the New York Times

            Behind-the-scenes doc features all the news that’s fit to print

            Print is dead. It’s a refrain that gets repeated a lot in today’s Wi-Fi-filled, Twitter-fied, Kindle-toting world. And—premature obituary or not—it’s still an uncomfortable pronouncement for those of us still gainfully employed in the industry. Depending on how you look at it, the documentary Page One: Inside the New York Times can be seen as either an elegy for a dying medium or a paean to an industry in flux. Either way, it should be vital viewing for those in the business of being informed.

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            You Are Going Down

            Three Alibi contributors pick up 2011 AltWeekly Awards nominations!

            The Association of Alternative Newsweeklies runs a notoriously tough, nationwide alt.weekly journalism contest—and the Alibi is kicking some unprecedented ass in it. This year, more than 88 publications submitted their very best stuff in design and writing categories. Here’s how Albuquerque is representing:

            • Alibi restaurant critic and food columnist Ari LeVaux is one of four finalists duking it out for Best Food Writing, circulation under 50,000. (The three stories we submitted: “Le Fooding,” “An Offal Story” and “Chewing the Fat.”) Masticate the competition, Ari!

            • Registered nurse and recent UNM family nurse practitioner program graduate Whitny Doyle writes our Miss Diagnosis column. She’s been selected as a finalist for Best Column, circulation under 50,000. (The articles we submitted: “Seduction of a Nurse,” “Robbins Burns Rubbers” and “Life and Death on the Night Shift.”) Draw some blood out there, you phlebotomist!

            • Last but not least, Alibi graphic designer Jeff Drew is up for awards in two distinct categories. His cover for Vermont’s Seven Days and illustrations for the Pacific Northwest Inlander are both heavy contenders. Render those other fools into a vanishing point of pain, you X-ACTO knife-wielding art-school murderer!

              news

              The Daily Word: 5.13.11- revenge attacks, future of journalism, bring your passport, decapitated bodies

              A bunch of serious, depressing stories and a couple bright ones

              Revenge bombing in Pakistan may be first of many.

              Europe to curtail passport-free travel, stopper immigration.

              Robert Krulwich, Radiolab host, gives commencement speech on the future of journalism.

              Facebook paid PR firm to smear Google.

              Nineteen decapitated bodies found in Durango, Mexico since Monday.

              Two cyclists hit by cars Thursday, one dead. Not cool.

              NM Forest Service to close several forests due to extreme fire danger.

              Murders/suicide in Idaho leaves
              five dead.

              Mapfund announces a million in grants to groundbreaking performers.

              The Oatmeal instructions for being a bad salesperson.

              Shameless Self-Promotion

              I’ll be teaching journalism to teens

              In my early single-digit years, I used to go from table to table at restaurants and ask people questions. I have cassette tapes of interviews I conducted on my brown Fisher Price recorder. In middle school and high school, I ran an “underground newspaper,” which was basically just a ranty ’zine.

              I had no idea I wanted to be a journalist.

              Maybe you know some people ages 12-20 who show all the signs of becoming exporters of media. Send them to Warehouse 508. Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, Juli Cobb and I will co-teach the after-school Hype 508 course.

              The pitch:

              Interview your favorite artists and musicians, review CDs, dig up the news and write for an audience in this student-directed class. Using the net and DIY-style publication as our means of distribution, we will blog and create digital packages and put out a monthly zine. Build a collection of clips that will help you apply to college or for internships in the publishing world.

              The 14-week class costs $20 total. Register here.

                This Just In

                Dan Mayfield will be editor in chief of Albuquerque the Magazine

                Reporter, columnist and pompadoured-man-about-town Dan Mayfield has left the Albuquerque Journal after six very visible years, announcing that he’s the next to helm Albuquerque the Magazine. Besides churning out culture-heavy copy at that daily paper, including a New Mexico film industry beat, Mayfield tells me that managing the Friday Venue section has given him plenty of experience editing a publication. Still, when he starts work in a few weeks, Mayfield says he’d like to get a feel for how the magazine operates from the ground up, first by sitting at the copy desk and engaging in the nuts and bolts aspects of putting the publication together. December will be his official first issue in the EIC hot seat. Whether he’ll still have time to do his doo-wop radio show Sundays on 1600 AM, we’ll just have to wait and see.

                journalism, education

                Support your local school paper

                Crazed journalist allowed access to school children

                Print journalists do not actually look like this.
                comicmix.com
                Print journalists do not actually look like this.

                I was given the opportunity to poison young minds this morning.

                The first meeting of the newspaper class at Albuquerque High School met today and I came in to show them how it’s done. I brought along a colleague, Ali Patterson, a copy editor at the Albuquerque Journal, because it is important to show the neophytes that not all newspaper people are disheveled miscreants who mumble a lot and look like they haven’t slept in days. Ali calls the two extremes of journalistic types “type A” and “type B.” There doesn’t seem to be anyone in the middle between the organized A’s and everyone else.

                I have spoken with a high school journalism class once before. It had six editors-in-chief. That doesn’t work. A newspaper has to have a mafia-style paramilitary command structure with a supreme commander at the top. Otherwise, nothing will get done. A newspaper is a machine and must run efficiently, even if some of us end up spinning in the gears.

                I told the class to select a leader and warned the leader not to be a douche. It is important to get the job done but not to alienate the troops. I’ve had pompous, arrogant editors, and everyone in their employ will eventually undermine them. It’s apparently hard to have power and not abuse it.

                A girl in the class rose at the end and identified herself as editor-in-chief. I have no idea if that had already been decided upon or if she was taking the mafia analogy too literally. She certainly seemed to have what it takes.

                Ali and I mulled over a few more topics: design, lede writing, learning the devil Associated Press Style, the importance of getting facts right, and the joy of pissing off the powers-that-be.

                Ali spoke about checking names, places and all the small things that can screw up an otherwise perfectly good newspaper. I told the kids about the demon readers who only live to find mistakes in newsprint. They’re out there, and they suck.

                One kid asked, “What if I get in trouble for a story I write?” I told him to get his facts straight, be fair and tell the truth. They can, and will, get mad, but they can’t do anything about it.

                I was a student journalist in college and it changed my life. When I was a kid I was a mark for bullies and mean people. Now they are my collective bitch. Journalism has been a godsend for me, has taught me how to use my words.

                The paper was, and is, a place for word nerds to obtain glory they are otherwise denied. Support your local school paper.

                We’re going back in a month or two to check out a few issues and offer some critique. I can’t wait.

                  commentary

                  Mal Oso

                  El Oso and former employer
                  El Oso and former employer

                  It’s good to be me again.

                  My last employers didn’t allow freelancing, something about “owning” my brain. Their other reason was that I represented their paper with my name and would apparently besmirch their good name were I to write for other papers. Does the word “hubris” come to mind, anyone?

                  Since writing for the Weekly Alibi was and is an irresistible temptation, I resorted to pen names. Freedom of Expression, what a novel idea.

                  First there was “Juan Maloso.” Maloso came from a Mexican coworker, Chuy, at a bad New Mexican restaurant I won’t name where I washed dishes during my formative years. Young and stupid, I regaled Chuy with tales of my recent bad behavior while drunk. He nodded his head in disapproval and muttered, “mal oso.” Since I hung around people who used monikers in those days, I became Dr. Maloso. I added Juan for pen name purposes.

                  Juan Maloso lasted exactly one column before I switched back to John Bear. I figured I have worked several years trying to get my name out in the universe and hated the anonymity of a nom de plume.

                  So I was John Bear. Of course, I was discovered. My former editor took me in the office and slapped a pile of Alibi columns in my hand. It was not unlike “To Catch a Predator.” For the record, I had never said I was going to quit.

                  But I did try to compromise. That meant another pen name. I first considered John Mitotero. “Mitotero” means “a gossip” in Spanish. I get called that frequently down in Valencia County. It pisses some people off. I considered it a term of endearment.

                  But it didn’t roll off the tongue. So I went for “Movida.” That means “side job” [snicker].

                  I couldn’t be John Movida, as apparently a pen name has to be absolute, so I called another reporter in Oklahoma and said “I need a first name.”

                  “Pete,” he said.

                  So I was Pete Movida.

                  For one more column. They found out before the ink was dry, and I was canned. The same “To catch a Predator” set up—them handing me the column, and me glancing down at it and laughing at my own jokes. It was worth it.

                  Books

                  A novel about the newsroom

                  Journalism may be a dying art, but novelist Tom Rachman breathes life back into the newsroom in The Imperfectionists, his debut novel. But don’t be mistaken; journalism has never seemed more unappealing than in Rachman’s chronicle of misfits. The book is set in Rome, the site of an international English-language newspaper, which was founded in the 1950s for mysterious reasons. Now, long past its heyday, the paper is host to a bevy of characters who limp along in their work and in their personal lives.

                  Each chapter is devoted to a particular character and member of the staff. Some of them include copy editor Ruby Zaga, who hides from her loneliness in hotel rooms, Editor-in-chief Kathleen Solson, a woman dealing with her husband’s infidelity, and publisher Oliver Ott, a recluse with an obsession with his dog.

                  The novel is all about character development, and Rachman’s portrayal of each journalist allows the reader to piece together an image of the quirky newsroom. The character development extends to the paper itself—the chapters are interspersed with flashbacks from the beginnings of the publication, when it was a bit more glamorous. Finally, the fate of the paper is revealed in the last chapter, along with why it was founded in the first place. Read the New York Times Sunday Book Review right here.

                    V.19 No.30 | 7/29/2010

                    Bear With Me

                    I, Fired

                    A small-town reporter goes for broke

                    I’m a tumbleweed; you’re a micromanaging fascist.

                    In a case of irony invading my life, I was fired from my newspaper job for writing.

                    I had been working as a crime reporter for a twice-weekly paper, which means I was broke but also working as feature writer, city council writer, question-of-the-week writer, parade correspondent, photographer and Lunch Boy.

                    Lunch Boy (one who fetches the editor’s lunch) wasn’t offered as a class in college, so I learned on the job. Actually, I have no journalism degree, either, and learned how to be a reporter by being a reporter.

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                    News

                    Daniel Schorr dead at 93

                    Photo by Geneva Collins; Copyright © 2001 Current Publishing Committee

                    The fearless journalist who famously made Richard Nixon's shit list—and leaked the Pike report to the Village Voice when his then-employer CBS was too scared to run with it—is dead at age 93. He never backed down. The world needs more guys like him.

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