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V.25 No.10 | 03/10/2016

Literature

British Author Visits Page One

Press Release [ Thu Apr 7 2016 1:00 PM ]

James Terry will be at Page One Books at 4pm on Saturday, April 9, to talk about and sign his book of Deming-based tales, Kingdom of the Sun: Stories.

The book is described as such: Set in southwestern New Mexico, the stories in James Terry's debut explore the joys, insecurities and failures of memorable characters as they attempt to connect with—or disconnect from—others around them. The elderly landlady of the Darling Courts apartments hires a reclusive handyman who suffers from a fear of water, and the pair forms an unlikely bond. A worker's unscrupulous plan to build a road in the middle of the desert is threatened by a lonely pregnant woman living in a trailer parked directly in his path. Overcome by nostalgia, a married trucker making the California run from Waco to Los Angeles takes a truck-stop waitress to the Deming drive-in theater with disappointing results. Together, these surprising stories uncover how our environment manifests itself in our everyday lives.

Terry's fiction has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and the O. Henry Prize, and his stories have appeared in the Iowa Review, the Georgia Review, Fiction and elsewhere. Raised in Deming, N.M., Terry now resides in Liverpool, England.

V.25 No.11 | 03/17/2016

Literature

Teaching Across Cultural Strengths

Press Release [ Tue Apr 5 2016 1:00 PM ]

UNM Associate Professor Alicia Chávez will be at the UNM Bookstore on Thursday, April 7, at 12pm to sign copies of Teaching Across Cultural Strengths (Stylus, 2016).

In Teaching Across Cultural Strengths, Chávez suggests that an imbalance in the teaching and learning situation exists when the teacher teaches from one cultural perspective and the student's primary learning experiences come from another cultural perspective. To enhance the possibility that the student will master the learning situation and achieve its deep objectives, it is important that college teachers expand their cultural reach and include multicultural perspectives in the teaching and learning situations. Teaching Across Cultural
Strengths offers a comprehensive set of guidelines based on a sound theoretical foundation, and empirical research that will enable college teachers to narrow the gap in cross cultural teaching and student learning.

Alicia Chávez is an Associate Professor in Educational Leadership and Policy at UNM. She has served as collegiate leader, student affairs professional, and faculty member in universities around the country. Chávez has also co-authored several books on culture and college teaching, including Web Based Teaching Across Culture and Age (Springer, 2013).

The UNM Bookstore is located at 2301 Central Ave. NE at the intersection of Cornell and Central.

V.25 No.7 | 02/18/2016

Literature

Three Promises for Jane: A True Story of Madness and Redemption

English professor visits Page One

Press Release [ Sun Mar 13 2016 12:00 PM ]
Professor Liese from San Juan College reads from her new book.
V.25 No.8 | 02/25/2016

Literature

Jemez Springs Library to Sell Signed Books, Rare Works by Tony Hillerman

Press Release [ Thu Feb 25 2016 11:38 AM ]

JEMEZ SPRINGS, NM—The Jemez Springs Public Library in Jemez Springs, New Mexico will give fans of the late author Tony Hillerman a rare opportunity to purchase everything from unedited manuscripts to signed books and first editions at a special book sale on Saturday, Feb. 27, which coincides with the village's Cabin Fever Festival.

At least 30 published and unpublished works written between 1970 and 1990 will be sold at the sale–all of which were donated from Hillerman's daughter, author Anne Hillerman.

Hillerman had a deep affinity for Jemez Springs and its inspiring beauty, and would frequently participate in the library's annual Speakers Series for several years which featured notable authors, alongside fellow New Mexico authors Rudolfo Anaya and N. Scott Momaday. Incidentally, Anaya's fictitious book, Jemez Spring (correct spelling) was set in the village.

"It is a great honor for the library and community of Jemez Springs to receive a collection like this," said Suzanne Swetnam, president of the Friends of the Jemez Springs Public Library. "We are very thankful to Anne Hillerman for remembering Jemez Springs Library in such a special way. We know that the village must have been near and dear to Mr. Hillerman's heart and we are grateful that we'll be able to share his memory with those who have been touched by his words."

Some book titles in the collection include: Hunting Badger (first edition), Sacred Clowns (first edition), Skin Walkers (first edition), Talking God (first edition), Dark Wind (first edition), The Fallen Man (uncorrected proof), Ghostway (first edition), Ghostly (third edition), The Sinister Pig (uncorrected proof and first edition), among others.

The books, many of which are signed, have been appraised. Prices will range from $75 to $150 each, which will go directly to the Friends for the library’s numerous reading programs including summer programs which include movie nights, educational programs, children’s programs and the Jemez Historical Project run by Judith Isaacs and more. Each book will contain an insert featuring a certificate of authenticity.

The library will feature a permanent exhibition of some of Hillerman's work in the upcoming months.

The book sale has been scheduled as part of the Cabin Fever Festival on Feb. 27 from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. in Jemez Springs. The Cabin Fever Festival will be held at Fitzgerald Park in the village, and features a Chile Cook Off, professional chainsaw carvers from the Sandia Bear Company who will auction their work, a crosscut log cutting contest, arts and crafts sale and much more. There is no entry fee.

The Jemez Springs Public Library is located at 30 Jemez Springs Plaza at the Village Plaza near the gazebo.

Tony Hillerman, who passed away at the age of 83 in 2008, was a former reporter whose evocative mystery novels were often set in the Southwest and usually infused the Native American culture into his stories. His 1973 book, Dance Hall of the Dead won him an Edgar Allan Poe Award, and an Agatha Award for memoirs published in 2001. Other popular Hillerman books include The Blessing Way, Listening Woman and many others.

V.25 No.7 | 02/18/2016
Artist Megumi Iagarashi AKA Rokudenashiko

Articles I've Read this Week

A reading list for wasting time at work

When I used to work in an office that required I be stationed at my desk for eight hours a day, no matter how productive I was or how much work I actually had to do, I found that I spent a lot of the extra, onerous hours reading. So, I appreciated a curated list of interesting content from the www. Here's a list of suggested reading for you poor saps just killing time. As always, check out the Daily Word for more weirdness from the backalleys of the internet.

A vagina-centric Japanese artist persists in making her work despite having been arrested TWICE. Read about Rokudenashiko HERE.

I'm a morning person, a so-called "lark" according to science. Now, researchers suggest that there are more than just two categories (morning people and "night owls"). I hate feeling low-energy, so new research on sleep is always interesting. Read about the four types of sleep schedules HERE.

This essay on one of my favorite websites, that of Bomb Magazine, had me at the subheader: "A confession: I can’t stop watching videos of marathon runners expiring at the finish line." Read this essay about death, running and so much more HERE.

Frontpiece of Gaspar Pérez de Villagráâs Historia de la Nuevo México, published in 1610. Villagrá was the official chronicler of Juan de Oñateâs 1598 expedition

Arts

1623 in Print in New Mexico

A free First Friday event

Press Release [ Mon Feb 22 2016 11:00 AM ]

On Friday, March 4, State Historian Rick Hendricks talks about the books Spanish colonists were reading in the year that Shakespeare’s First Folio was printed. (Shakespeare may have read them, too!) A Free First Friday Evening event. Free admission 5–8 pm at New Mexico History Museum

V.25 No.6 | 02/11/2016

Literature

What Makes a Snowflake?

Press Release [ Wed Feb 17 2016 12:41 PM ]
A local author visits Page One Books to read his new children's book on snowflakes.

Literature

New Science Fiction at Page 1 Books

Press Release [ Thu Feb 11 2016 11:23 AM ]
Mark G. Cosman talks about his new work, Descent of the Gods.
V.25 No.5 | 02/04/2016

Literature

Equestrian Therapist Visits Page 1 Books

Press Release [ Wed Feb 10 2016 12:17 PM ]
Patricia J. Conoway talks about her new book on horses and Alzheimer's.
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V.25 No.2 | 01/14/2016
Martin Droeshout - Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University

Event Horizon

The Most Expensive Book in the World

Wednesday, Jan 27: What Is the First Folio Anyway, and Why Should We Care?

By Renee Chavez [ Mon Jan 25 2016 12:00 PM ]
Shakespeare's first folio is on exhibit at the New Mexico Museum of Art for the month of February.
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comics

Skim

The graphic novel by Mariko and Jillian Tamaki

By Maggie Grimason [ Tue Jan 19 2016 9:53 AM ]

I spent a lot of this weekend up before dawn with a pair of binoculars banging against the zipper of the embarrassingly large jacket my mom bought for me one Christmas. Birdwatching, yes, the sport of the elderly, really took a toll on me.

So I spent my Sunday evening finally digging into Mariko and Jillian Tamaki's graphic novel, Skim, which has been on my shortlist of "to reads" for some time. Mariko handled text for this goth, Wiccan coming-of-age tale, while her cousin, Jillian, covered the illustration in fine black ink. The story is about Kimberly Keiko Cameron AKA "Skim," called so because she's not.

In a relatively concise number of pages Skim deals with the suicide of a classmate, very much on her periphery, whose death has a ripple effect through the school. In addition, she attends her first coven gathering/AA meeting, falls in love (and makes out with!) her quirky English teacher, and drifts apart from her best friend.

One might think this amount of action would make it seem as if no one story gets rendered completely, but on the contrary, each functions well as a part of the larger story. That is, the story of a thoughtful, serious young woman navigating life's difficulties for the first time.

In addition to deft dialogue and excellent pacing, Jillian Tamaki's illustrations are spot-on, illuminating the story in indispensable ways.

I'm late to this party. The book was published in 2009, but the fourth edition of the paperback just came out in 2015. There's not enough good things to say about this story of an outcast surviving high school at its most treacherous.

V.25 No.1 | 01/07/2016
He may have penned a song called "I Can't Read" by David Bowie was, in fact, an avid reader

David Bowie's Reading List

You, too, can become great

By Maggie Grimason [ Tue Jan 12 2016 1:00 AM ]

In case you live under a rock and only get your news from the Alibi's blog- David Bowie passed away on Sunday.

As images and playlists crowd your various feeds, it might be revealing to take a look at the books that fed an impressive creative mind.

Here New York Public library compiled Bowie's top 100 books as drawn from a 2013 Facebook post from Bowie himself. Stand outs for me include titles by Don DeLillo, James Baldwin and Yukio Mishima. Cue up your preferred Bowie mix and get to reading.

David Bowie's Top 100 Books

V.24 No.53 | 12/31/2015

Event Horizon

Pro or Con?

Friday, Jan 8: Sixth Annual Comic Con

By Devin D. O'Leary [ Wed Jan 6 2016 3:15 PM ]
Bring the whole family for three days of events including films, celebrity signings, vendors, cosplay and more.
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V.24 No.51 | 12/17/2015

Here's to Dickens

And the greatest Christmas story every told

By Maggie Grimason [ Tue Dec 22 2015 10:01 AM ]

My favorite Christmas story of all time is … A Christmas Carol. Maybe it is because I love Halloween and the story is a nice marriage of the two. Three ghosts showing up at the strike of an eerie old clock? And those children hiding under The Ghost of Christmas Future's cloak? Jesus! There's nothing scarier than taking a look at all the decisions you've made in your life and really flinching. Even the Muppets couldn't really make the story totally lighthearted. The horror of the past, the horror...

Charles Dickens was said to love a night time stroll around the gaslight illuminated streets of 19th century London. I can only imagine the spooky stories culled from those cobbled streets, how the coughs born of a grimy, coal-fired city and the figures huddled for warmth in the winding alleys might have produced the works we're familiar with today. Dickens wanted to write a political pamphlet about the social ills he saw in the city, instead, he decided to write A Christmas Carol, declaring that a bit of fiction would have much more force.

The endearing image of Scrooge, sickly old Tiny Tim and the cadre of spirits that direct the story certainly have a moral to teach that translates through the centuries.

V.24 No.50 | 12/10/2015

Looking Backwards: Books

One of the most important books I read this year

By Maggie Grimason [ Tue Dec 15 2015 1:43 PM ]
Binary Star by Sarah Gerard is a radiant piece of fiction
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