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V.25 No.24 | 06/16/2016

The Daily Word in Emojis, Artful Expression and A Chicken Thief

By Monica Schmitt [ Tue Jun 21 2016 11:05 AM ]
The Daily Word

A mama Black Bear attacked a marathon-runner at Valles Caldera National Park in defense of her cubs. The runner survived by playing dead, but the Department of Game and Fish euthanized the bear, who was part of a study and wearing a tracking device.

You may be able to purchase a semi-automatic rifle in a number of minutes, but don't count on sending a rifle emoji.

Young artist Kaylin Andres who has been diagnosed with a rare form of bone cancer expresses the realities of her illness through timeless art exhibits.

So, this is strange: In Jackson, Mississippi a 77-year-old man stole three boxes of frozen chicken before hastily riding away on a bicycle.

Looks like the Great Pyramid of Giza is a bit crooked. Ah well, we all make mistakes. Even extraterrestrials.

Anyone else growing as impatient as I am to see Steven Spielberg's rendition of Roald Dahl's fantastically imaginative book The BFG? The director and producer explains why he feels a distinct connection with the Big Friendly Giant.

In case you're looking for some fresh summer road trip jams.

V.25 No.20 | 05/19/2016

Event Horizon

Hive Five!

Saturday, May 28: Bees and Seeds Festival

By Maggie Grimason [ Thu May 26 2016 10:00 AM ]
Second annual fest with eco-friendly vendors, food trucks, artists and professional beekeepers. Free plants available courtesy of Red Tractor Farm.
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The Daily Word in Nature, Banksy and Stonehenge

By Monica Schmitt [ Tue May 24 2016 12:59 PM ]
The Daily Word

If you're also wondering "who the f*ck builds a stonehenge," the answer may not be as mysterious as you think. But until someone builds a time machine and travels to the past, who really knows?

Today marks The European Day of Parks, a cause for celebration and appreciation of the region's protected natural places. Find that last bit of inspiration needed for a European adventure in these stunning photos.

Works by the forever anonymous and controversial artist Banksy are lent by private collectors and shown at a gallery in Rome.

Governor Martinez is one Burqueña who will neither support nor protest the Albuquerque Trump rally. The reason? She's “really busy.”

Venezuelans, furious about food shortages and inflation, protest against President Maduro on the streets of Caracas.

Don't fear trans people in bathrooms, fear diaper changing stations. Learn from this woman's mistake and remember to put the table back up.

V.25 No.19 | 05/12/2016

Event Horizon

May the Forest be with You

Sunday, May 22: Hiking to History

By Maggie Grimason [ Fri May 20 2016 11:00 AM ]
Author Robert Juyan reviews his newest book.
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V.25 No.18 | 05/05/2016

Literature

Poetry and Prose at Local Book Store

Press Release [ Fri May 13 2016 10:15 AM ]

Jeanne Shannon, born on a farm in Virginia, will be at Page One Books at 3pm on Sunday, May 15, to talk about and sign her book of poetry and prose, Summoning.

The book is described as such: "A collection of poems and hybrid works that hover at the boundary between poetry and prose, and that range from the abstract and experimental to the concrete and accessible. Employing imagery that is vivid and frequently surprising, the author addresses subjects that include the natural world (especially the plant kingdom), art and music, the dreamlike regions of memory, and the mysterious—the 'dissolving forms' that tell us the world is stranger than we might suppose. In the title poem and others, she summons recollections of her early life in 1940s southwestern Virginia, 'the heart of Appalachia.'"

Shannon was born on a snowy morning on a farm in southwestern Virginia, “the heart of Appalachia,” when the Sun was in Aquarius and the Moon was in Taurus. She has lived in the west (Arizona and New Mexico) for most of her adult life. She writes poems that she characterizes as paintings—often impressionistic, sometimes abstract. It's hard to find one that does not contain a reference to a member of the vegetable kingdom, be it tree, weed or flower. She is pleased to claim Robert Beverley, historian of early Virginia whose name appears in Fourteen Ways of Looking at a Painting by Georgia O'Keeffe, as a maternal ancestor.

News

The Daily Word in snake wine, wolf poaching and a feast for 5,000

By Renee Chavez [ Wed May 11 2016 12:30 PM ]
The Daily Word

So, uh, stuff has happened in the past on this day.

Make sure to read the fine print in your most recent PNM bill.

Take a look at APD's new use of force policy.

Awwwoooo! Do you have a wolfie heart?

In NY, a feast for 5,000 people was made out of food that would have been thrown away.

New studies show that government culling of wolves increases poaching.

Is Earth really the only habitable planet?

Move over dudes. The salamanders don't need you anymore.

Rare seal pups need the ice that is melting.

Pro tip: Don't drink or make wine with tiger bones in it.

via morguefile

Event Horizon

Nature, Man

Saturday, May 7: Herbfest 2016

By Joshua Lee [ Fri May 6 2016 5:00 PM ]
Herbs, wildflowers, native plants and arts and crafts for sale, guided bird and nature walks, live music, crafts for kids, a raffle and refreshments.
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V.25 No.16 | 04/21/2016
via compfight

Event Horizon

Send It Soaring

Saturday, Apr 23: Kite Fest

By Monica Schmitt [ Fri Apr 22 2016 10:00 AM ]
Colorful kites of all shapes and sizes. Visitors can bring their own kite, buy one at the festival or watch professional stunt kite fliers maneuver kites expertly in the wind.
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V.25 No.14 | 04/07/2016
via morguefile

Event Horizon

Water Shoes Not Required

Sunday, Apr 17: Down in the Bosque Opening Reception and Talk

By Maggie Grimason [ Fri Apr 15 2016 10:00 AM ]
Artist Alan Paine Radebaugh discusses his work.
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V.25 No.9 | 03/03/2016

nature

The Crows, Crows, Crows

One of the world's smartest animals is right overhead

By Maggie Grimason [ Tue Mar 8 2016 10:49 AM ]

What's almost as amazing as the fact that the crow is one of the world's smartest animals, is that they're so commonplace. But, when you think about it, it follows: Smart animals survive and proliferate.

These intrepid black birds (from their beaks to their feet) are part of the corvid family, which also includes that other close relative of the crow, the raven. Almost all species of corvid have been observed using tools, have well-studied languages, a demonstrable generational memory and frequently vocalize emotions like fear and happiness. Domesticated crows even have "names" for their owners, typified by a vocalization only used in the presence of a particular person. Further, they are able to recognize a number of faces.

Part of the crow's ability to endure is the fact that they eat such a variety of food, over 1,000 different documented items. Dedicated omnivores, they'll eat carrion or carry out. They even recognize logos. Sadly and amazingly, crows will always descend upon a McDonald's bag before they peak into a plain brown sack.

If you need a list of 19 more reasons to love crows and some baby pics that make it impossible not to, check out this Buzzfeed list.

And also consider the great imagery these big black birds provide. They show up time and again in popular media ... take a listen to the Mountain Goats' song "The Crow," my personal favorite song about these special birds.

V.25 No.4 | 01/28/2016
morgueFile

Event Horizon

Bee Afraid!

Friday, Feb 5: NM Beekeepers 2016 Conference

By Joshua Lee [ Thu Feb 4 2016 12:00 PM ]
Several speakers are giving talks plus there is a hands-on area, educational materials, vendors and giveaways and a raffle for a one-of-a-kind bee quilt.
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V.25 No.3 | 01/21/2016
Coot is cute!

nature

Winter Ducks of the Rio Grande

As good a time as any to head to the bosque

By Maggie Grimason [ Tue Jan 26 2016 1:00 PM ]

I'm lucky enough to have had the opportunity to spend several mornings and evenings along the middle Rio Grande bosque counting songbirds and waterfowl. Along with the season's emblematic Sandhill Cranes, there is an abundance of birds that are easy to spot, easy to identify and which there is plenty of to see along Albuquerque's sliver of the mighty river.

Among these, perhaps the most common is the Mallard Duck. Both males and females- usually mated at this point in the year- swim through the acqueias and the river proper. These ducks are endemic the whole world through and the males- with a glossy green head and shades of brown feathers down their wings, backs and chests- are easy to spot. More often than not, if you spot a male, there will be a better camouflaged female nearby.

The Gadwall Duck- nearly the size of the Mallard, but with more understated coloration and a black bill- is also easy to find in the river this winter. These ducks are nearly as widespread as the Mallard due to their extreme adaptability. They've even been known to snatch food from the beak of other diving ducks.

Looking for something even more adorable? The Coot- technically part of the Rail family- is dark, petite and easy to spot in open water. These birds are black throughout the body, but have a light, even white colored bill, and sometimes show white on the tail. Making them even more endearing, coots have small, rounded wings and are weak fliers, despite their ability to cover large distances when necessary.

Also keep an eye out for the striking Wigeon, too. These birds breed farther north and make their way down to Albuquerque during the winter season. Males are colorful, with a cream colored forehead and jade green highlights while females are grayish overall. I've spotted just one along the Rio Grande this winter, but these are increasingly abundant.

Also found along the river: dog prints, coyote prints, the spine of a large mammal. Winter time is just as wonderful to test the waters of the Rio Grande, particularly when we have such an abundance of beautiful birds floating by for the season.

V.24 No.53 | 12/31/2015
morguefile.com

Literature

Poetic Saturdays

A Haiku for Cold Weather

By Renee Chavez [ Sat Jan 9 2016 11:00 AM ]
When it's cold AF outside...

morguefile.com

Event Horizon

Winter's Feather Forecast

Saturday, Jan 9: Winter Bird and Bat Festival

By Maggie Grimason [ Thu Jan 7 2016 1:00 PM ]
A speaker program, guided bird and plant walks, live birds with Wildlife Rescue and others, and crafts for kids.
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V.24 No.50 | 12/10/2015
morguefile.com

Event Horizon

Birdseed Made Beautiful

Sunday, Dec 20: Winter Solstice Mandala Creation

By Cerridwen Stucky [ Fri Dec 18 2015 10:30 AM ]
Join in creating a huge mandala made of seeds and grains which can be eaten by birds, composted or can quickly biodegrade.
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