net neutrality


V.25 No.33 | 08/18/2016

The Daily Word in Fake Guns, Poop Explosions and How to Catch a Sensitive Ghost

The Daily Word

I can die happy: here's a video of a Russian sewage truck—filled to the brim with poop—literally popping in the middle of nose-to-nose traffic.

Net neutrality apparently started in the 1920's with the Hush-A-Phone, a device that clipped over the mouthpiece of telephones and allowed the user to muffle their voice and keep their private conversations from the eavesdropping ears of their neighbors. AT&T tried to make it illegal to use third-party attachments on their phones (because monopoly) and ended up going before the FCC over the case. AT&T won, and law students still study it in reference to net neutrality.

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia is trying to attract the ghost of former art photographer Thomas Eakins with nude models and robots. Really.

A gun manufacturer had their replica gun booth shut down at Wizard World, a comic book convention. Not because they did anything wrong, but because people don't like guns, I guess? Um. Obviously, they thought those "wrath of Thor" tweets were literal. Super powers don't kill people. Supervillains do.

Meanwhile, in Russia, they sell model assault rifles in airports. O strange new world, that has such people in it.

So, hundreds of these creepy little stitched up balls of ... something ... washed up on a beach in England. Turns out these horror-movie rejects are actually "sea potatoes," a common species of sea urchin. So far, no one is sure why such a big urchin dump even happened.

V.24 No.9 | 02/26/2015

news

The Daily Word in racist fashion police, net neutrality and GIANT black holes!

The Daily Word

It's Thursday! Not exactly as good as Friday, but still pretty damn good.

The Internet may not be owned by a few corporations soon because Washington seems to be pretty down with net neutrality!

There is a black hole that is 12 billion times larger than the sun and is 900 million years old.

Zendaya Coleman elegantly explained why assuming dreadlocks smell like “patchouli oil” or “weed” is racist and weird. Giuliana Rancic apologizes. The internet gives Coleman a giant high five.

A new proposal would require Lyft and Uber drivers to provide insurance and undergo extensive background checks.

Surveys conclude that over half of all farm workers in America lack “legitimate documents” and therefore have no legal rights or protection.

V.23 No.36 |

news

The Daily Word in on-again, off-again pot ballot measures

The Daily Word

Remember the pot question that was going to be on the ballot, then wasn’t going to be on the ballot, then was going to be on the ballot? It’s not going to be on the ballot.

You don’t have to dig up an Alamogordo landfill to find a lot of copies of a terrible game from the last century. A store in Albuquerque has hundreds of copies of “Night Trap,” the 1993 game that sent Senaotor Lieberman into apoplexy and pushed the industry to adopt a rating system.

Roses!

A Colorado teen has plead guilty to conspiring to help ISIS.

Does your Internet seem slow today? Time to learn about net neutrality.

And Facebook likes Harry Potter better than the bible.

V.19 No.47 | 11/25/2010
Commissioner Michael Copps spoke to a crowd of more than 400 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.
Sam Adams

Newscity

Not Just Net Neutral

FCC commissioner rallies New Mexicans around Internet freedom but remains silent on plans

Michael Copps of the Federal Communications Commission had a lot to say about the importance of access to information and the Internet. But he remained tight-lipped on how and when the FCC would protect it.

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news

I’m on “New Mexico in Focus” tonight

Tune in to KNME at 7 p.m. We debated net neutrality, the loss of the New Mexico Independent, beer at The Pit and medical marijuana in Arizona, among other things. If you don’t catch it tonight, you can always find it online (full video here).

V.19 No.33 | 8/19/2010

Thin Line

Digital Justice

Google's been known as a fierce advocate for net neutrality. But the web giant, along with Verizon, is suggesting a model critics say threatens Internet freedom. "What they're trying to set up is a public, slower-running Internet and a private, faster-running Internet," says Andrea Quijada, executive director of the New Mexico Media Literacy Project.

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V.19 No.19 | 5/13/2010

WWW

The FCC Changes How It Regulates the Entire Internet

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released its plan to change how it regulates the entire Internet yesterday, attempting to balance a its charter, which states that the FCC should keep internet regulation to a minimum, with a desire to enforce net neutrality.

The new policy only affects broadband transmissions, meaning that the actual data online won't be regulated by the FCC. Internet service providers (ISPs) will be subject to telecommunications services regulation, which currently governs land-line telephones. However, the FCC's general counsel said that only six of the 48 provisions that govern telecommunications services might apply to broadband Internet – for example, the FCC won't have the power to regulate prices. These six provisions forbid ISPs from “unreasonable denials of service and other unjust and unreasonable practices,” a response to a dispute between the FCC and Comcast, where the FCC ordered Comcast to stop limiting data-heavy Bittorrent uploads. Other provisions allow the FCC to push forward on bringing universal broadband to the United States, require ISPs to keep private information obtained from their customers private, and make broadband service accessible to the disabled. While I barely understand what's going on, most major tech blogs have weighed in, and GigaOm has found a pair of videos that attempt to explain the ruling and the situation.

The reregulation came about after the FCC discovered that Comcast was delaying Bittorrent uploads and attempted to use its power to stop the interference. When a court ruled that the FCC didn't have the authority, rather than abide by the decision, the FCC got to work changing the rules. Of course, neither side is happy; ISPs say they're worried the FCC has overstepped its bounds, while net neutrality advocates say that the FCC didn't go far enough.