protest


V.23 No.14 | 4/3/2014
Albuquerque citizens protest APD’s fatal officer-involved shootings on Sunday, March 30, 2014.
Zak T Photography

Opinion

APD Ad Absurdum

Mainstream media misses protests’ point

By Mike Smith
Author Mike Smith urges Albuquerque citizens against cherry-picking chaotic moments from hours of peaceful protest against APD’s inordinately high number of fatal officer-involved shootings.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

APD Chief Gordon Eden
KRQE

Crib Notes

Crib Notes: April 3, 2014

By August March
Test your knowledge of last week’s New Mexico news—from APD protests to air travel to bears—with our weekly pop quiz.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

news

Demonstrators Denounce Anti-Abortion Shills on Civic Plaza

A coalition of abortion-rights activists, local politicians and members of the Jewish community held a rally Tuesday afternoon in downtown Albuquerque to denounce and demand protection from domestic terrorism. About 200 people gathered on Civic Plaza and listened, as rally organizers blasted out-of-state anti-abortion activists for terrorist acts, including inappropriate protests and demonstrations at the New Mexico Holocaust & Intolerance Museum, a birthing center and the office of a local family physician.

The rally comes little more than two weeks after teens from a California-based teen anti-abortion group converged on the museum, holding a large banner declaring, “ABQ: America’s Aushwitz [sic],” while others passed out graphic photos of aborted fetuses and “wanted-style” postcards with pictures, names and addresses of local doctors. The teens were in town as a part of a public-awareness campaign supporting a proposed ballot measure to restrict late-term abortions within Albuquerque city limits.

While former Lieutenant Governor Diane Denish, the rally's first speaker, gave a brief account of life before Roe v. Wade, a female rally-goer could be heard shouting, “NO MORE COAT HANGERS.” Denish recalled the days when women had to take “desperate measures” to end unwanted pregnancies.

“I am a mother of two daughters and a grandmother of two granddaughters, and I want them to have the same rights to safe abortion that has been legal for the past 40 years,” she said.

The measure, if approved, would outlaw abortions after 20 weeks, unless medical professionals deemed the pregnancy a threat to the mother’s health; it would not allow exceptions for cases of rape, incest or severe fetal anomaly. Albuquerque voters will have to decide the measure during a special election, because there isn't enough time for the City Council to approve the resolution for October’s upcoming ballot.

V.22 No.33 | 8/15/2013
Anti-abortion activists protest at Southwestern Women’s Options on Lomas on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013.
Barron Jones

News Feature

Teenage Protest Pilgrimage Arrives

Young adults bused in to reinforce local pro-life movement

By Barron Jones
Barron Jones reports on out-of-state teen and young adult anti-abortion protesters and their graphic, controversial nine-day campaign to raise pro-life awareness in Albuquerque.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

Food

Hundreds of Santa Feans just say no to Monsanto

Luis Peña
My family and I loaded into the family van on Saturday for a trip. Instead of heading out on a picnic or camping in the woods, we headed to Santa Fe to participate in the March On Monsanto. The event was coordinated globally through social media in over 400 cities. As farmers and seed savers, we are well aware of the dangers posed by genetic modification.

To my surprise, there were over 400 people at the demonstration on the Santa Fe Railyard. This coincided with the Saturday Farmer's Market, which created a perfect audience among the Market's mostly green and liberal crowd. After a few speeches by local activists, the group marched to the state capital—waving signs, banners and carrying puppets that warned of the dangers of genetic modification. The protest culminated in live music and rants of various types. It wasn’t your typical family outing, but it was a great day for being alive nonetheless. Siempre en la lucha.

Editor’s note: Scroll on for more photos and a poem by Beata Tsosie-Peña.

Luis Peña

Message to Monsanto

I am my own nation, with self-determination, a voice, and my own boundaries

You cannot encroach your mad science here

There will be no splicing, dicing, forceful injections to sterilize THIS free will

Your campaign of violence will never silence,

The power and song of sovereign landscapes

Your campaign to dominate

Remaining pockets of land-based beauty will fail

Your twisted esteem has yet to see

The power of ecology, boomeranged back at you with all the breath and balance

Of pure, reciprocal pollinators

Its funny the audacity, that monoculture mentality

For it’s in our inherent biodiversity

That the hungry will be fed

It’s the garden of truth in our hearts

That will keep our encoded memories

From being bled, carried out in sterile labs

Where viruses are shot with intentional precision

Enacting double helix holocausts on seeds we are supposed to protect

Your poisoning of generations is a toxic war crime

Carried over from your shameful days

Of bombarding veterans and civilians with an an agent called orange

Whose children with disabilities have yet to see

Justice or healthcare in their daily sunrise

Your poisoning of future generations will go no further

For while capitalism feeds you

And sneaky Protection Acts shield your diabolical crew,

Well protect this Monsanto, I am boycotting you

Watch as consumers change this tide

And the world community will no longer abide

No one will care when your abominations are set ablaze

And this place will rejoice

As Indigenous seed weathers its last era of tyranny

Our desert beauty genetics are as strong as our memory

And only we know how to tend and mend,

This land where our spirit is rooted, deeper than you know

We must keep growing our own food, saving heirloom seeds

Keep demanding these basic rights

And at the very least,

change for mandatory gmo labeling is now in sight

Nature has our back, is creating round up resistant seed

Being classified by your people as a super weed

Immune to your poison, is a plant called amaranth

That has fed us through centuries of colonization

What a relief and realization

That we are indeed a living civilization

Adapting and growing amidst such violent supremacy

You can rage into oblivion, drowning in your own greed

Unless you accept your deep need

To be retaught lessons of balance with technology, that does not have to bleed

It is time for this first crop of a movement to flourish

For collective action to harvest truth on hallowed ground

Sweet fruit we inherited

Through natural law that cannot be patented

Spirit beings of all that is alive

Help us get through these times

And we’ll return to our sacred promise

Our rightful place, as stewards of creativity and land-based grace

We remember now, when it is time to become warriors

When our seed is threatened and you have hurt our mother

We’ll stand our ground,

Carry solid intention as we walk in mass

For this is our nation

With self-determination, a voice, and boundaries,

Where only those with souls

In the end shall pass.

—Beata Tsosie-Peña, 2013

Luis Peña

Luis Peña
news

The Daily Word in transgender rights, twisters in the US and an arrested "Worm"

Weather experts warn that more devastating weather can be expected on Monday after tornadoes ripped through the U.S. from Texas all the way to Minnesota on Sunday, May 19.

Yahoo buys Tumblr, promises not to "screw it up."

Kim case adds focus to how the feds probed a working journalist.

Miranda Pacheco, who killed a bicyclist three years ago, is in jail again for reckless driving.

DEA claims that marketing heroin to teens is making Albuquerque's drug problems worse.

Protest to take place on Monday morning for Damian Garcia, a transgender student at St. Pius High School, over which cap and gown he will wear on graduation day.

"Worm" arrested for alleged assault and throwing a rival's moped into the ocean ...

V.21 No.41 | 10/11/2012
Taking a break from the rigors of protesting
Maren Tarro

Freedom of Assembly

Preaching to the Prez

Christian groups shout mixed messages at the White House

By Maren Tarro
A coalition of Christian groups goes to Washington, D.C., to protest prayerfully.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.34 | 8/23/2012
Pussy Riot
Igor Tuchin CC 3.0

Aural Fixation

The Power of Pussy

Thanks, Rioteers

By Marisa Demarco
Five punk women took on the state, took on the church and they won. Because even though they're paying for it with two years in jail, their ideas lit people up around the globe, inspiring action.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

Culture

Free Pussy Riot

On the altar of the Christ the Savior Cathedral in Moscow, five masked women prayed. They prayed for an end to President Vladimir Putin’s rein. They prayed for the virgin to become a feminist.

The February protest aimed to highlight the ties between Putin and the Russian Orthodox Church that put him into power. The words convey the weird tangle of church, culture and state. Scope the full text.

Three women were arrested days after the prayer—five had participated in the minute-long event—and have been held in prison ever since on charges of hooliganism. There was a time when this would have seemed more outrageous to free speech-prizing Americans. But we’ve gotten used to arrests after political protests.

Their trial began yesterday and they could do seven years in prison. Two of the defendants have young kids.

The women’s lawyers say they’ve been deprived of sleep and not fed. And though polls indicate most Russians think seven years in jail is too severe a punishment, they seem to agree Pussy Riot should do some time.

Still, internationally, Putin’s looking ever more the fool.

Musicians like Tobi Vail of Bikini Kill and JD Samson of Le Tigre stood in solidarity with Pussy Riot from the start. Hannah Lew of Grass Widow wrote that she feels spoiled as an American musician, and U.S. performers should be inspired to engage in nonviolent protest.

Madonna, Sting, Peter Gabriel and the Red Hot Chili Peppers jumped on the bandwagon today, too, showing support for Pussy Riot.

Freepussyriot.org is keeping track of the collective’s allies.

More Videos

opinion

Video from the Chicago NATO protests

In this week’s opinion slot, Andrew Beale recounts his trip to the City of Wind to film and participate in the protests against NATO. He argues that biased mainstream media accounts are part of why more people get their news from Internet sources and from shaky cell phone videos posted to YouTube. Online, Beale’s piece “Don’t Believe the Hype” includes video footage he shot at the demonstration.

V.21 No.24 | 6/14/2012

Occupy the Alibi

Don’t Believe the Hype

By Andrew Beale
The image of veterans flinging their medals in the direction of McCormick Place, where the summit was held, provided an incredibly strong statement that our columnist will never forget. As powerful as that was, the act was far overshadowed by the violence immediately afterward, he writes.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

V.21 No.22 | 5/31/2012
Chuck Hosking prepares to ride to Kirtland Air Force Base.
Rebecca Belletto

From the Foxhole

Preach the Gospel Always

If necessary, use words

By Alex E. Limkin
Chuck Hosking is an American marvel, as close to a homegrown prophet as you’re likely to come across.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

news

Protest against APD shootings today at 4 p.m.

There were two fatal shootings by Albuquerque Police Department officers last week. On Monday, March 19, officer Martin Smith killed Daniel Tillison, who rammed two vehicles as he tried to avoid arrest, according to police. On Wednesday, March 21, SWAT officer Russ Carter killed Gary Atencio near Laguna Pueblo. Police say Atencio fired shots at his wife on the Westside of Albuquerque then led officers on a chase down I-40.

On Friday, the Albuquerque Journal revealed that the police union cuts checks for $300 or $500 to officers who’ve shot people. They money is intended to help officers and their families get out of town for a while, according to the union. Mayor Richard Berry and Police Chief Ray Schultz weren’t happy about it, with Berry saying he was “shocked” and Schultz calling the practice “troubling.”

This afternoon, the families of those who’ve been killed by APD will be joined by local activist organizations on Civic Plaza. The rally will start at 4 p.m., and demonstrators will demand the federal Department of Justice examine Albuquerque’s police force. Citizens have long been calling for such an investigation, and though the Council passed a measure requesting one last year, the mayor vetoed it.

Organizer Mike Gomez’ 22-year-old son Alan was shot and killed by police in May 2011. Alan was holding a plastic spoon. “We will bring signs and photos of loved ones,” says Mike Gomez in a news release. “We will let everyone know we still want justice. We have them on the defensive. We must continue the pressure.”

news

Wear Your Hoodie Wednesday

A friend who moved here from another part of the country told me he calls the hoodie the Albuquerque raincoat. I’d argue it’s our suncoat, too. And our hanging-out-at-home-coat or going-to-the-opera coat. Hell, put on two or three, and that’s blizzard-ready gear.

Well, tomorrow folks can break out the 505 all-weather, all-eras jacket of choice to show solidarity with Trayvon Martin.

Martin was walking home from a convenience store in Florida, talking on his celly with his girlfriend, when he started to feel like he was being followed. He was approached by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, who shot and killed the African-American teen.

In a 911 recording, Zimmerman was advised not to follow Martin despite his suspicions. He did anyway. Zimmerman hasn’t yet been charged with a crime and says he was acting in self-defense.

People around the country are outraged and demanding the gunman be arrested.

Tomorrow demonstrators will gather in Union Square and march to the United Nations. Wednesday also marks the UN International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

In solidarity, you can wear your hoodie, and upload a picture of yourself to Twitter, Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #millionhoodies. Or you can sign this petition on change.org, which was started by Martin’s parents.

More Videos

WWW

Thousands of websites to protest SOPA tomorrow

The good kind of sopa. Let us not allow this other suspect SOPA to tarnish its good name.
The good kind of sopa. Let us not allow this other suspect SOPA to tarnish its good name.

You’ve probably heard that Wikipedia, Reddit, Boing Boing, Mozilla, TwitPic, WordPress and others will go dark tomorrow. Politico estimates about 7,000 sites will participate in the blackout.

Google will put a button on its homepage directing users to information about Stop Online Piracy Act, the bill these Internet giants are protesting.

The BBC broke down the controversy for us.

Here’s an explanation of how SOPA and its Senate twin PIPA could affect you.

Nonmobile version