race


news

The Daily Word in fiery semi, unchicken, stripper database

Minority births are the majority in the U.S.

A semi truck carrying lighter fluid just combusted on I-40.

If you're wondering why there are throngs of people in Albuquerque on Sunday, it's the eclipse.

Will drones spy on us?

Council plans for a stripper database delayed.

Tape dress. Neat.

The world's oldest yoga teacher is 93. And she's a badass.

Republican Super Pac plotting extreme attack ads about President Obama.

Limbless man attempting to swim between five continents.

Coffee drinkers live longer, says my new favorite study.

Fake chicken meat-maker promises new nonflesh will be even better than the real thing.

Gale-force wind in yo face.

news

Wear Your Hoodie Wednesday

A friend who moved here from another part of the country told me he calls the hoodie the Albuquerque raincoat. I’d argue it’s our suncoat, too. And our hanging-out-at-home-coat or going-to-the-opera coat. Hell, put on two or three, and that’s blizzard-ready gear.

Well, tomorrow folks can break out the 505 all-weather, all-eras jacket of choice to show solidarity with Trayvon Martin.

Martin was walking home from a convenience store in Florida, talking on his celly with his girlfriend, when he started to feel like he was being followed. He was approached by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, who shot and killed the African-American teen.

In a 911 recording, Zimmerman was advised not to follow Martin despite his suspicions. He did anyway. Zimmerman hasn’t yet been charged with a crime and says he was acting in self-defense.

People around the country are outraged and demanding the gunman be arrested.

Tomorrow demonstrators will gather in Union Square and march to the United Nations. Wednesday also marks the UN International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

In solidarity, you can wear your hoodie, and upload a picture of yourself to Twitter, Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #millionhoodies. Or you can sign this petition on change.org, which was started by Martin’s parents.

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News

Class action payout for Native farmers

George and Marilyn Keepseagle at their ranch on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota
Courtesy of Cohen, Milstein, Sellers and Toll law firm
George and Marilyn Keepseagle at their ranch on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota

Alibi reporter Carolyn Carlson drove out to Gallup at the end of December to speak with claimants for a $760 million settlement. The payout is the result of a class action lawsuitKeepseagle v. Vilsack brought by Native American farmers who were denied USDA loans by a prejudiced Department of Agriculture.

The court battle was 13 years long.

After it was over, lawyers went to different parts of the country to find people who qualified for part of the settlement. About 300 people from New Mexico filed claims.

This isn’t the first time the Agriculture Department’s been in hot water for discrimination:

• In October 2011, African-American farmers settled their case against the Agriculture Department for $1.2 billion.

• In March 2011, women and Hispanic farmers settled their lawsuit for $1.3 billion.

V.21 No.2 | 1/12/2012
George and Marilyn Keepseagle at their ranch on the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota
Courtesy of Cohen, Milstein, Sellers and Toll law firm

News Feature

Justice for Native Farmers

Class action settlement to benefit New Mexicans

By Carolyn Carlson
The U.S. District Court approved the Keepseagle v. Vilsack class action settlement of $760 million. Lawyers sought out potential claimants for that moneyincluding people in New Mexico.

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V.20 No.51 | 12/22/2011

News Bite

By Marisa Demarco

NAACP Sues the City

A local chapter of the NAACP is suing the City of Albuquerque, charging that it treats African-American employees poorly. And Jewel Hall says the city is not backing the 22nd annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Multicultural Celebration next month.

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news

The Daily Word in the end of the Iraq War, the NAACP and the Golden Globes

The Iraq War is over, and the remaining troops are coming home.

Feds issue a scathing report of Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, saying his treatment of Hispanics constitutes extensive civil rights violations.

Man sentenced to 10 years for distributing oxymorphone pills at a party. A 15-year-old died.

Top five places your car will get stolen in Albuquerque.

The Army made a sandwich that's good for two years.

Golden Globe nominees.

CEOs in America enjoyed a pay hike between 27 percent and 40 percent last year.

African-American legislator called the governor a Mexican.

Nob Hill merchants are banding together for a sales day today after that apocalyptic windstorm besieged the Shop and Stroll.

The NAACP is suing the city.

Girl forced to eat jalapeños on nacho day at a Rio Rancho elementary.

Michael Jackson's daughter on that mask her dad made her wear.

The AG's looking to throw the book at Jerome Block Jr.

Chomsky encourages occupiers to keep going through neighborhood-based political organizing.

The most boring celebs of 2011.

news

The NAACP is suing the city

Yesterday, the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People filed a discrimination lawsuit in District Court against the city of Albuquerque. It accuses the city of treating African-American employees differently on the basis of race.

The lawsuit charges that the city does not promote African-American workers, pays them less and asks extra work of them without compensation. They are also subject to harassment and intimidation, according to the lawsuit.

The city demands that African-American employees “perform menial and demeaning tasks,” states the lawsuit, and requires them “to adhere to unwritten policies and procedures” that don’t apply to other city workers. “This conduct is continuing and is pervasive,” according to the suit.

In June, the NAACP filed a discrimination complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a national agency that ensures federal discrimination laws are enforced. In September, the commission told Albuquerque’s NAACP that it was within its rights to take the issue to court.

The African-American employees of the city will be represented as a class by the Law Office of Brad Hall. The suit says they’ve suffered “loss of income and benefits, damage to their reputation, severe emotional distress, [and] disruption of their career,” among other things.

News

The Daily Word in Gaddafi, tattoo Barbie and electronic whips

Gaddafi is dead.

Was the Elephant Butte killer really a killer?

New Mexico is considering opening a "foreigners only" DMV in Albuquerque.

Maybe the Declaration of Independence was illegal.

The State Fair is insolvent.

Tattoo Barbie.

Who runs the world?

In Alabama, "Mexican" is a dirty word.

Authorities capture or kill all the animals freed from a preserve in Ohioexcept for one monkey.

Disneyland big brothers hotel workers with a system employees call the "electronic whip."

Archeologists unearth a street from the 1600s in Santa Fe.

We are using a lot of antidepressants.

The new Cranberries singletheir first in a decadeis not so great.

The real Sybil says the multiple personalities weren't real.

opinion

African-Americans in New Mexico

This week, columnist Gene Grant called for African-Americans to speak up against injustices in New Mexico. In particular, he looked at the case of 16-year Journal photographer Adolphe Pierre-Louis, who spent 30 minutes cuffed on the side of I-40, though he committed no crime. Grant also pointed to the case of state trooper Dexter Brock, who was cuffed to a telephone pole by coworkers in 2000. Grant writes:

What happened to these two New Mexico brothers would not stand in many other states, and it should not stand here. It's time to put disapproval from African-Americans on the record for all to witness.

The piece reminded me of a brilliant essay we ran in 2007 called “Can I Touch Your Hair?” by Virginia Lovliere Hampton. It’s really one of the better discussions of race in our state that’s been published, and it’s one of my favorite articles that’s run in the paper. She writes about the positive aspects of living in New Mexico, as well as the downside of being in a region where African-Americans are a small percentage of the population.

One of those common experiences is having our hair “touched” if we have or wear our hair “nappy.” In Albuquerqueand, I hear, in Santa Fe, too“nappy-headed” people of African descent are confronted regularly with having perfect strangers reach toward us to touch our hair or, worse, that of our young childrenoften without askinglike we’re dolls or other merchandise to be handled. It's unsettling, objectifying and rude, especially for those of us who, like me, are from the South, where, apparently, white folks are raised a little better.

I hear all the time that racism isn’t so prevalent in New Mexicoparticularly against African-Americans. But it’s worth considering the insidious problems ignoring these issues can create.

V.20 No.24 | 6/16/2011
Spc. Adam Jarrell was stationed in Afghanistan for a year with New Mexico’s National Guard. During that time, someone hung a noose outside his sleeping quarters, according to a complaint filed by the American Civil Liberties Union.
Courtesy of Adam Jarrell

News Feature

Return Fire

Soldier files a racism complaint about his superiors

By Marisa Demarco
Adam Jarrell has wanted to be in the military since he was a kid. So his treatment in Afghanistan came as quite a shock, he says. During his yearlong deployment, he was subject to racial slurs and threats of physical violence, according to a complaint. Jarrell says someone even hung a noose outside his sleeping quarters.

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politics

A racist joke from the Secretary of State’s Office?

Political action committee, the Justice League, got a packet from Secretary of State Dianna Duran about filing finance reports. It included a link to an Excel spreadsheet with a sample of how PACs should fill out their info.

That sample, says the Justice League, is racist.

The sample last name, Sheryl Powdrell-Culbertson, is a combination of Sheryl Williams Stapleton and Jane Powdrell-Culbert, two members of the state Legislature who are African American. The sample first name is Jefferson Davis, who was the president of the Confederacy.

The sample PAC represented by Jefferson Davis Sheryl Powdrell-Culbertson is the National Organization of the Beer Drinkers and Guzzlers.

Rep. Powdrell-Culbert (R-Corrales) says it was racist. Secretary of State Duran called her up earlier today, the legislator says. “I think the person that did it, first of all, was very stupid to do something like that. I’m sure that she will take the appropriate step in addressing it.”

As an African-American state representative, “you end up having to deal with some stuff that you’d rather not deal with,” Powdrell-Culbert continues, “and you have to attribute it to the person’s ignorance.”

The Justice League is calling for the immediate resignation of Duran, but the legislator says that’s too much. “I respect her,” Powdrell-Culbert says of her fellow Republican. “She respects me, and we have a relationship. She will address it.”

Rep. Williams Stapleton (D-Albuquerque) was not available for comment. The Secretary of State’s Office has not yet issued a response.

news

The Daily Word 10.21.10: R.I.P. Penthouse founder, last guv debate, prop. 19

The last gubernatorial debate is tonight at 7 p.m. on KOB channel 4.

LGBT college students at UNM talked bullying and wore purple yesterday.

ICE detainees treated like criminals, though immigration charges are civil.

Nurse impostor steals IDs, police say.

New Mexico's attorney general and state auditor: Locked in silent struggle.

Woman scammed buying a jeep on Craigslist.

Keith Richards says Mick Jagger is unbearable.

NPR fired analyst Juan Williams, who said on Fox News that he's afraid of being on planes with Muslims.

Taliban on the run.

Penthouse founder Bob Guccione died. R.I.P. scary little porn man.

What if you didn't owe anyone money?

Prop. 19, which would legalize marijuana in California, is slipping in the polls.

Alec Baldwin's LOL ad in favor of gay NY marriage.

Sexy "Glee" photos make parents mad.

On behalf of Comic Sans.

This guy turned his shed into a recording studio and made the news in the U.K.

V.19 No.42 | 10/21/2010
Gwen Ifill
Don Perdue

Talking Points

Race and Politics

A longtime journalist discusses Obama and the 2010 elections

By Marisa Demarco

Gwen Ifill is not paying attention to the Senate race in Delaware, though tea party favorite Christine O'Donnell hits national headlines most days. And Ifill is not so interested in New York's gubernatorial race, where GOP candidate Carl Paladino's gaffes are the talk of the town. "Even though they make interesting cable news conversation, neither of the out-there candidates in those races seems to have a chance of winning," she says. "I'm more interested in what the outcomes are going to be."

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