rangers


news

The Daily Word in Rail Runner hikes, more Gaddafi death videos, no KFC for Travolta

Rail Runner raising fares in 45 days.

No lunch in Texas prisons on weekends.

New video of a bloody Gaddafi being dragged about challenges preliminary reports as to the nature of his death.

Two minor quakes hit the Bay Area same day as earthquake preparedness drills take place.

Travolta denied reservation at KFC while in UK for a Scientology conference.

Somebody was making fake checks in the Northeast Heights.

Rangers rally to tie World Series in dramatic fashion.

Lindsay Lohan show's up for community service at the L.A. County morgue, which, by the way, sells some awesome merch.

Seattle Hertz branch axes 25 Somali Muslims for length of prayer breaks.

Breaking down the ownership laws for exotic pets in lieu of the Ohio fiasco.

Cain makes changes to 9-9-9.

Ralph Montoya gets 25 years for murder of UNM professor and his girlfriend.

Murdoch ponies up $3.2 million for phone hack of murdered 13-year-old.

N.M. senators propose expansion of area in which Mexican nationals can visit in the state for a 30-day period.

Shaq cleared in kidnapping lawsuit.


news

The Daily Word: 7.8.11- Middle East protests, miracle twins, baseball fan's demise and Leal's execution.

And the senseless butchering of The Great Gatsby

APD SWAT needed to break up domestic dispute.

Thousands of Egyptians demand faster reform, fill Tahrir square again.

Also, thousands of Syrians protest president, fill Hama.

South Sudan becomes an independent country tomorrow. Happy birthday, South Sudan!

Man falls from stands to death, trying to catch ball at Rangers game.

Twins born 50 hours apart, in two different counties.

California prison inmates on hunger strike over isolating conditions.

Texas is all "I do what I want," and executes Humberto Leal.

Dude, the unemployment rate is high.

Roger Ebert's appropriately scathing review of a dumbed-down Great Gatsby. With winch-inducing excerpts!

Doghouse Diaries on camera technology.

sports

So. The Texas Rangers. How about it?

Chuck Norris can punch a cyclops between the eye
Chuck Norris can punch a cyclops between the eye

Man, I never would have thought I would be here. I was certain they were going to roll. I was afraid for my friend's long-term well-being and then, magically, a week ago it all came together. The Texas Rangers beat the Tampa Bay Rays in a best of 5 serieswithout winning a single game at home. (This, oddly, made them still without a home playoff win in their entire existence until their current series.)

Now, they've embarked on the journey that all Davids must undergo if they want to take down baseball's ultimate crown: that perpetual Goliath, the New York Yankees.

As a baseball hater, when October inevitably arrives each year, I usually turn my rooting interests the way of the Yankees. They're usually pretty good, they win a good percentage of the time, and they're at least somewhat entertaining, especially given their links to Jay-Z.

Now, however, I'll have to root against my pseudo-team. And I'll be happy to do so. Despite any troll comments online, the Texas Rangers' story only gets better and better to me. Turns out, when they clinched the American League Division Series in game five, the team celebrated with ginger ale before breaking out the champagne. Why? Slugger Josh Hamilton is a recovering alcoholic. Plenty of smart-mouthed sports fans made negative cracks about that in the last week, but imagine being him and seeing your teammates holding back on their celebration out of respect for you. My fandom of the Rangers begins at that noble point.

Count Cliff Lee, their pitcher extraordinaire, as reason No. 2. With an ERA of 3.18, through the regular season, he ranked sixth in the American League this year. He's been in the league a mere eight years, and made it to the World Series in 2009 with the Philadelphia Phillies, only to fall to the New York Yankees. Added intrigue to an already interesting storyline? Count me in. Through the fourth game of the American League Championship Series, Lee's pitching at an insane 1.26 ERA and hasn't lost a single game he's started.

Last but not least, I default to the somewhat bizarre case of the Rangers' sad luck. Having made it to the playoffs only three times before this year, they've always been eliminated by, you guessed it, the New York Yankees. Now, with a chance to get back at the bully in the ALCS, there's a lot to root for. Game 4 was played in New York yesterday, with the Rangers walking all over the Yankees, for the second night in a row. The Rangers lost their first home game last Friday, but proceeded to win (their first postseason home victory in the history of their franchise!) on Saturday. Things stayed cheerful for the Texas boys in New York, and with the win last night they're only one away from their first ever trip to the World Series.

Tune in today at 2:07 p.m. on TBS as the Rangers try to wrap things up in New York.

sports

That baseball kind of joy

Who would have thought in a week when Gilbert Arenas banished his sense of humor and an 7-time Pro Bowl-er gets traded to a now-Super Bowl bound team that I'd end up writing about baseball? And yet, forces have aligned.

Last week, I wrote about my friend's lifelong love for the Texas Rangers, and today they began their playoff battle. A team that, as I noted, had previously won only one playoff game in their entire existence, started the journey on the road. The Rangers played the Tampa Bay Rays and were firmly in command the whole time. Listening on the radio while at work had an old-school effect not only on my buddy at work, but on the rest of us as well, constantly checking in with him for updates, despite the fact the the ever-present Internet was (as always) a mere click away.

Seeing my buddy after work was like seeing a kid after their team wins its first game. I'm not sure I can stand much more of his happiness, but I'm definitely rooting for it.

All that joy was, if not erased or negated, kind of deflated a mere five hours later, though. As I stopped by Marble Brewery to pick up a growler after work, I eased up to the bar to see another baseball game on. The Philadelphia Phillies were playing the Cincinnati Reds, but the game was pretty much over. It was the top of the ninth, and the Phillies were up 4-0, pitching. There wasn't much chance of a Reds comeback and yet, to my right was a guy in a Phillies jersey, watching the TV in rapture.

I hope I won't be mischaracterizing this man to say that, as the game wrapped up, he looked like he was liable to cry in joy. There seemed to be an inordinate amount of cheering happening on the TV as well, so I couldn't help but ask my fellow drinker: "Did the Phillies do something more special than winning the first game of the playoffs?"

He replied that Roy Halladay, the pitcher for the Phillies, had just proceeded to pitch only the second no-hitter in MLB playoff history. Only accomplished once, 54 years ago this Friday, a no-hitter in the playoffs is better than almost anyone would have predicted for Halladay's first experience in the playoffs. He'd never made it there before, despite playing in the big leagues for 15 years.

And with that, the Texas Rangers' moment in the sun was eclipsed suddenly, unexpectedly and totally, by a pitcher on a tear. Here's to both the Rangers and Halladay's continued success. Follow along on the radio. You'll be glad you did.

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