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V.22 No.13 |
CNM Montoya Campus, Periodicals Distro, March 27
Darrell Sparks
CNM Montoya Campus, Periodicals Distro, March 27

news

CNM Chronicle editor Jyllian Roach speaks out

By Jyllian Roach [ Thu Mar 28 2013 12:37 PM ]

“What were you thinking?”

“Why a sex issue?”

Before Tuesday, I've never had so many people interested in my thoughts. The idea for an issue based on sex and sexuality first came up in Sept. 2012. The CNM Chronicle managing editor at the time and I had been kicking around all sorts of ideas for a special edition; when I suggested sex and sexuality, we immediately agreed.

The very first article we had decided on was the center spread. “A Rainbow of Sexuality” was something that was very important to me and I knew that no matter what else went into that edition, a round table interview would be the centerpiece.

Every week after, I would tell the writers to come up with ideas and keep a running list of things they thought might be interesting. Just before spring break, we selected the articles that would go into the issue. Everyone on the staff contributed something to the creation of this issue. It mattered to them as much as it mattered to me.

So why do it?

Because we do not talk about sex openly. Sex, sexuality, gender identity and masturbation: these are not dirty words. It is not wrong to talk about these concepts and practices. People have sex. Our parents did it, we do it and, one day, our kids will do it, too. Not talking about these things puts people at risk, not just for pregnancy and STD/STIs, but for abusive relationships, misguided decisions and self-loathing.

From the beginning, my goal was to educate. I wanted to honestly discuss topics that were relevant to the times. Suicide rates among LGBT teens have skyrocketed. The Boy Scouts of America are being boycotted for kicking out gay members. The Girl Scouts of the USA are being boycotted for allowing transgendered children to join. E.L. James’ “50 Shades” trilogy has sold millions of copies and will soon be a adapted into a movie, all while giving a drastically incomplete and sensationalized view of the BDSM community. Realistically, we are an office of 13 people who write for an audience of 30,000. We cannot change the world, but we had the opportunity and an obligation to inform our readers and if even a single person walked away better informed about sex and sexuality, then we made a difference.

We expected disagreement. I learned when I first began working for the Chronicle that pleasing everyone all at once is the sort of goal that will drive a person crazy. I wanted feedback, especially from those who disagreed. I wanted to have open discussions about what others thought was right, wrong or just plain left out. Those comments are what will allow me to do my job better next time.

I thought others would be open to that, too. I believed that I and my staff would be respected as journalists and adults and that those who were offended or upset by the issue would talk to us, as has always been the case in the past. But then, I have always been a bit of an idealist. The up-side to this whole affair is that our issue reached more readers than we expected.

People throughout the nation, and even on other continents, have read all about sex and sexuality. Some of those people may have been offended or disturbed, and that's okay; it is not mandatory to agree with newspapers, but we can be sure now that we reached and educated at least one person.

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V.22 No.8 | 2/21/2013

Sex and Its Discontents

Alibi Sex Survey graphgasmic data orgy #4: The final chapter

In which we discover smoking after sex is officially out of fashion, among other things

By Jerry Cornelius [ Thu Feb 14 2013 4:30 PM ]

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the graphgasmographical data stream comes to a drippy end. Some things I learned about Burqueños: The vast majority have made out with strangers, yet haven’t caught a sexually-transmitted disease. Hmm. They also wouldn’t be caught dead smoking after sex. No surprise there, seeing how high “bad breath” scored on the turn-offs list. There’s a statistical dead heat on the importance of penis size and on having fooled around with a co-worker—so you may as well just flip a coin. The pro-anal-sex camp outnumbers the “once” or “never” camp by a healthy margin. But, more romantically, most people are not interested in an open relationship and would stick with their current partner for that one-last-shtup before the world ends—and furthermore, most have kept friendly with their ex-partners-in-crime. How warm and fuzzy.

So what does that say about Albuquerque? Promiscuous yet hygienic? Faithful yet forgiving? Free-thinking yet conservative? Who the hell knows? I’m just glad you’re all out there keeping things sexy for the rest of us. Let’s do it again sometime.

Have you ever made out with a stranger?

Have you had sex with a boss or co-worker?

Have you ever caught a Sexually Transmitted Disease?

Have you tried anal sex?

If the world were ending, would you have sex with your partner or someone else?

Would you consider an open sexual relationship?

The eternal question: Does penis size matter?

Are you generally on friendly terms with your exes?

Do you like to smoke after sex?

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V.22 No.6 |

news

The Daily Word in gun control, papal possibilities and the thigh gap

By Geoffrey Plant [ Tue Feb 12 2013 8:51 AM ]
The Daily Word

Governor Martinez is backing a bill that would require background checks for gun show purchases.

There is a public information meeting about the Paseo Del Norte/I-25 project.

Is the next Pope a Canadian?

Can the Pope even resign?

Horse meat for Swedish children.

How Ted Nugent avoided the draft.

How Arnold Schwarzenegger enjoyed Carnaval.

Classic porn paperbacks.

There was an emergency alert issued in Montana yesterday.

Things are getting less salty.

The thigh gap.

Did North Korea just blow up a nuclear bomb?

The fugitive LAPD cop may have gotten out of the country.

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V.22 No.6 | 2/7/2013

Sex and Its Discontents

Alibi Sex Survey graphgasmic data orgy #3

In which we speak of talking dirty in person and on the phone

By Jerry Cornelius [ Mon Feb 11 2013 6:06 PM ]

This installment tells us many things: Those who are satisfied are the largest voting bloc, but those who aren’t outnumber them. Sharing sex fantasies is more popular than not sharing them. A lot of people have experimented with an alternate gender sex partner, but most haven’t. Cybersex is way too out there for most Burqueños—we prefer phone sex even though it’s not 1995 anymore. And talking dirty is near-universally accepted as the lingua franca of the bedroom. In fact, it may be what binds us together as a race.

On a related note, when the term “Burqueños” is used, we really mean “the 1,405 people who took all or part of our survey, 486 of whom are 22-30 years old and most of whom (969) are under 40.” In case that wasn’t obvious, I mean.

Are you satisfied with your current sexual situation?

Do you share your sexual fantasies with your partner?

Have you had a sexual encounter outside the gender you're used to?

Do you engage in cybersex?

Have you had phone sex?

Do you like talking dirty?

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Sex and Its Discontents

Alibi Sex Survey graphgasmic data orgy #2

In which we finally share the sexual frequency of Burqueños in greater detail

By Jerry Cornelius [ Mon Feb 11 2013 7:40 AM ]

Let’s hear it for “multiple times a week!”
Let’s hear it for “multiple times a week!”
Welcome back to the unscientific sharing of self-reported sexual proclivities of Albuquerque residents. This stuff is straight out of the SurveyMonkey data banks (you can also blame them for the cheesy infographic look), so I don’t want to hear any more complaints about histograms, telegrams or candygrams. This is as scientific as it’s gonna get.

The main take-aways here? Alibi readers do it frequently, probably more often than they floss their teeth. They do it together and they do it alone. They have no fear of employing power tools or other prosthetic devices, and they “sometimes” like to mix it up with booze and illicit substances. In other words, this town is one big sex party. Here’s the proof:

How frequently do you have sex with a partner?

And again!
And again!

How frequently do you masturbate?

The great tragedy is that we didn’t ask WHICH sex toys.
The great tragedy is that we didn’t ask WHICH sex toys.

Have you used sex toys?

Dear survey-taker, just because you did it ONE TIME without booze or pot, that does not qualify you to answer “sometimes.”
Dear survey-taker, just because you did it ONE TIME without booze or pot, that does not qualify you to answer “sometimes.”

Do you mix alcohol and/or drugs with sex?

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Sex and Its Discontents

Alibi Sex Survey graphgasmic data orgy #1

That’s right, I said graphgasmic

By Jerry Cornelius [ Fri Feb 8 2013 6:17 PM ]

Correctamundo
Correctamundo
Well, I coulda called it. In fact, I did call it: The hate mail has already started to pour in from pissed-off statisticians who found the (ahem) science of the Alibi’s First Ever Sex Survey to be somewhat slipshod. One guy even took issue with the “missing interval” in our when-did-you-lose-your-virginity graph and called our histogram “poorly constructed.” Them’s fightin’ words, partner! And if we knew what a histogram was, we’d be goddamn well pissed off about it. But let’s just get this out there right in the open right now: those finding the science to be lacking simply failed to notice that there was no science AT ALL. Dammit, Jim, I’m a newspaper man, not a statistician.

Here’s the truth: We used the WRONG NUMBERS for the virginity/age graph. They were actually the numbers from the “how old are you” demographic question, hence the failure of the graph to “correlate with the discussion.” So in the end, it’s not a question of missing intervals and histowhatsits, it is instead a question of being a fuckup.

In the interest of both science and setting the record straight, here now is the RIGHT GRAPH—both a legible one with low-scoring answers omitted (a practice applied to pretty much all the graphs we ran) and an ALMOST ILLEGIBLE one with ALL THE DATA (including such spurious answers as “0” and “1”). Happy? I hope so. More sexy graphs to come. Stay tuned.

Completamundo
Completamundo

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Alibi Sex Survey

Weekly Alibi’s First Ever Sex Survey

By Carl Petersen
Are bicycles sexy? I don't think so, and we were fairly careful not to ask about bicycles when we developed our First Ever Sex Survey. That notwithstanding, bicycles came up … along with graveyards, pancakes, rimming and other seemingly endless whatnots in the mountainous avalanche of data our survey produced. And cars. It seems like lots of people in Albuquerque are having sex in cars, so pay attention, and lock up next time you're in the parking garage.

Nearly 1,500 people responded to our survey. Who were these people? Let's consult the pie charts.

What did we learn? I'll leave that to our panel of experts.

Alibi Sex Survey

Sexy Body Parts, Turn-Offs and More

By Hunter Riley
If Albuquerque were a man, he would be an ass man. Based on the results from the sex survey, it was the highest reported sexiest body part. But don’t worry if you’re wishing you had more junk in the trunk, the second-highest rated sexiest body part were the windows to your soul.

Alibi Sex Survey

My secret turn-on is …

By Wrathchild

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Alibi Sex Survey

My sexiest experience ever was ...

By Julian Wolf

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Alibi Sex Survey

Albuquerque’s Sexiest Staff

By Gregory J. Pleshaw

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Alibi Sex Survey

Celebrity Sex

By Devin D. O’Leary

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Alibi Sex Survey

Sexy Albuquerque Fun Facts

By Carl Petersen
53.4% of us never engage in cyber sex, 80.8% of us like to talk dirty, 74.3% of us have made out with a stranger—and other fascinating stats.

Alibi Sex Survey

Fifty Shades of Yellow

BDSM Tips for Newbies

By Wrathchild
The rampant popularity of E.L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey has moved BDSM and fetishism from taboo to mainstream. However, the fetish community had a fairly negative reaction to this book for multiple reasons. Aside from painting the community in a negative light, the book conveys the grave misconception that any goober in possession of necktie can magically become a dungeon master overnight. The reality is that BDSM, a compound acronym for Bondage, Discipline, Dominance/submission, and Sadomasochism, is very much a delicate art form and can be potentially dangerous without the proper protocol and precautions. Here are a few tips for those adventurous lovers hoping to expand their horizons this Valentine's.

Alibi Sex Survey

Non-Monogamy 101

By Julian Wolf

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