street art


V.25 No.26 | 06/30/2016

The Daily Word in Street Art, Prosthetic Limbs and Space

The Daily Word

Portuguese graffiti artists have taken their work to a whole new dimension.

After a five-year journey, NASA's Juno spacecraft arrived safely at Jupiter. The successful mission yielded a very happy team of engineers.

A town supervisor in New York is looking towards environmentally friendly ways to combat viruses carried by mosquitoes. More specifically, getting help from our nocturnal, vision-impaired friends. Have you thanked a bat today?

Australia's complicated voting system leaves citizens with no clue who won the election, 48 hours later.

Inspired by a generation of praising computer-like accuracy, scientists reevaluate child-rearing methods in a new book and discuss the importance of communication and encouraging questions.

Police departments in some cities are exploring the possibility of texting for help in situations where making calls might feel too risky.

A 9-year-old girl who was born without a right hand was given a prosthetic arm from students at Sienna College. Complete with a Frozen theme.

V.25 No.24 | 06/16/2016

Rhapsody in Burque

Meaning in the Mundane

A stroll through the lively Nob Hill district is a reminder that the stunning artistry and energetic walls create a little haven of color and originality somewhere you might not expect.
Pixabay

Event Horizon

Mural, Mural, on the Wall

Saturday, Jun 18: The House on Mango Street Neighborhood Mural Tour

Executive Director of Working Classroom Gabrielle Uballez gives a tour of the powerful murals in historic Barelas neighborhood and discusses how environments help shape our sense of identity.
V.25 No.13 | 3/31/2016
Keystone Light

Culture Shock

City's New Installation Opens Downtown

Street art, sound art, performance art are all found on Central

Graggie walks the blurry line between art and life. Cops let her go.
V.24 No.39 | 9/24/2015

Art News

Roots of Resilience

Washington Middle School’s Mural Project

Students, educators and artists are collaborating to create Albuquerque’s largest outdoor mural.
V.22 No.41 | 10/10/2013
Oh, Banksy, you so crazy ...
[click to enlarge]

Arts

Better Out Than In: Britain’s Banksy Hops Across the Pond

Banksy has hit Broadway.

Today marks the tenth day of British street artist Banksy’s “residency on the streets of New York.” The artist’s website proudly declares that his famous—some might say infamous—work will be surfacing on the streets of the city that never sleeps for the month of October. The exhibit is titled Better Out Than In.

So far, there has been a new piece on a wall or vehicle every day—with the exception of the day when Banksy posted an ambiguous but clearly opinionated YouTube video on the Syrian War to his site. Among the street art is an intricately detailed rainforest scene in the back of an old delivery truck, the addition of the words “The Musical” to random graffiti around the city (ex. “Occupy! The Musical”) and the popular “THIS IS MY NEW YORK ACCENT … normally I write like this” spray-painting (below) on the Westside. All pieces are viewable on the street artist’s website and are now accompanied by a numbered tag, and a tongue-in-cheek audio component accessible by Banksy’s 800 number, 1-800-656-4271.

More than a week in, and it seems as if the city of New York hasn't yet decided how to respond to Banksy’s pieces. While the first was painted over within 24 hours—as the satirical American voice at the other end of the 800 number predicted—others are rapidly being removed from their original locations to auction. This presents an interesting dilemma; some wonder if—in such a cultured city—removing the murals is preservation of art or its destruction. According to The Guardian, Bristol's City Council polled citizens a few years ago about Banksy's art, and 97 percent voted that when a Banksy image appeared in public domain, it should remain.

While this conundrum is certainly one to mull over, this may be a good time to recognize some of Albuquerque’s own great street art, sanctioned and otherwise. Albuquerque, another city rich in art and culture, has long integrated street art into the urban landscape. Three years ago, 516 Arts hosted an event called STREET ART: A Celebration of Hip-Hop Culture and Free Expression, which left street murals around downtown Albuquerque. Participating artists included Chris Stain, who left a large painting of a solemn, silhouetted working man at Second and Central. Native Burqueño Ernest Doty was charged as the controversial, anonymous Rainbow Warrior, a street artist who spilled smile-inducing spectrums over buildings across the city. At least one of these rainbows remain untouched; whether that's due to cultural appreciation or inability to cover them up, I couldn’t say.

For more street works around the Duke City, check out the Street Art Albuquerque Facebook Page, which includes photos of acrylic and spray-painted works and the streets where they’re located. And to keep up with Banksy’s exhibit from the Duke City, visit the site or check out the #banskyny tag on Instagram.(Disclaimer: This blog is not intended to motivate all artistic adolescents to begin scribbling property that is not your own; some things are best left to the, er, more experienced.)

V.22 No.37 |
You'll need to stand in the middle of Gold St. west of 4th to see this one
plant

arts

House of CONSPIRACY!

Third Albuquerque Toynbee Tile Found

It was a Wednesday afternoon like any other. Business took my comrade and I to the intersection of 4th and Gold streets in downtown Albuquerque. Parking on the north side of Gold, across from the historic Simms Building, I ran across the street to deliver Alibis to a certain donut shop that operates out of the fifties-vintage steel/glass enclosure currently best known as the DEA offices on "Breaking Bad." On my return dash across the street I was keeping my eyes peeled for found money on the ground when lo and behold my psyche was confronted with the unmistakable color, shape and message of a third Albuquerque Toynbee Tile.

Cleverly deployed for decades onto streets around North America and the world, Toynbee Tiles appear to have arrived in Albuquerque sometime in 2011, the same year the excellent documentary film Resurrect Dead was released. Read the original story here and find out where the second Albuquerque Toynbee Tile is here. The coda to this most recent find reads "TIME'S UP!" and there's a nifty ashtray to the right. Keep looking down.

V.22 No.18 | 5/2/2013
communityproject.me

Art Preview

From the Ground Up

Two brothers hype community

Warehouse 508 has seen a spike in participation. They have the same number of events and the same facilities as always, but more and more youth are showing up. The difference may be Noah and Simon Kessler de St. Croix, two brothers who work hard to improve their community.

View in Alibi calendar calendar

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V.22 No.17 |
Breakfast of Champions: Power pellets
Blair Nodelman

art

8-bit garage

Sometimes, people take the liberty of exciting every old-school gamer by muralizing their garage entrance. I am completely and totally in support of this and, needless to say, driving by this Pac-Man mural every day keeps me pretty entertained. Keep an eye out for street art. Finding little gems like this make driving to work seem far less mundane, and may even keep that third-cup-of-coffee craving at bay. ... for a while longer.

Editor's note: Enjoy the Nuevo Mexicano chiptune banjo-pop of Bud Melvin below.

V.21 No.25 |
Plant

arts

CONSPIRACY!

Albuquerque Toynbee Tile


A friend hipped me to the location of a Toynbee Tile in downtown Albuquerque on Tijeras just east of Third St. The message on this particular tile appears to be of the "Hades/anti-media" ilk and is partially missing:

HOUSE OF HADES
ONE MAN VERSUS
AMERICAN....?

In the early eighties when the tiles started appearing in Philadelphia, the message on these small, public screeds was:

Toynbee Tiles, or at least the first generation of them, seem to be the work of a single man who believed he had discovered the secret of immortality in the writings of historian Arnold Toynbee, found confirmation of this possibility in the death sequence at the end of the Kubrick film 2001: A Space Odyssey, and felt an obsessive need to inform the human race that we could resurrect the dead. I can't remember what Jupiter has to do with it, but I like to think it's got something to do with Sun Ra.

The method for disseminating this concept, as well as other rants (mainly against "the media machine," sometimes anti-semitic, and often paranoid,) is to cut the message into linoleum tile, cover the edges of the tile with asphalt sealer and the top with tar paper -and proceed to drop it onto a busy street in the middle of the night, often in crosswalks. As vehicles drive over the tile, it is pushed into the street and eventually the paper comes off, revealing the message. Toynbee Tiles are found all over North America and in some parts of South America. There's an excellent, must-watch 2011 documentary film about the search for the Toynbee Tiler called "Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of The Toynbee Tiles."

V.20 No.26 | 6/30/2011
The head

Downtown

Amazing New Graffiti at Sixth and Central

Possible portrait of Falkor the Luck Dragon

The penny-farthing picture, bearing the phrase “park your car,” that was beautifying the SE corner of Sixth and Central, is gone. This is sad because I loved it so. It was a cheerful, lovely image blip on an otherwise blighted eyesore. It was painted on the tan (read “worst color ever”) plasticy wrap which currently encircles the Anasazi building, presumably to keep it from falling completely apart while someone does something to it.

The only good news I have (and it’s quite good) is that after the penny-farthing got disappeared, the artist/s returned and put up a new piece. It is a dragon more than 50 feet long, with a big smiling face that greeted me on the walk to work this morning. It is awesome. It’s even worth a trip out into this hot-as-the-face-of-the-sun weather to get a look at it. My pictures do not do it justice.

V.20 No.23 | 6/9/2011

Downtown

Downtown street art offers a penny farthing for your thoughts

This old-timey bicycle / car commentary is the latest tattoo on the Anasazi Building.

V.20 No.13 |

NEWS

The Daily Word 4.2.11: Edwin J. Quinby; killer cows; Jackie Mitchell, pitcher.

The Daily Word

Vintage eye disease pictures from two centuries ago.

Edwin J. Quinby, the petroleum industry, streetcars and music.

Roger Ebert's Arthur C. Clarke like prediction of movies on demand.

Are U.S. government microwave mind-control tests causing TV presenters' brains to melt down? Maybe you should start watching television again.

Did you download a torrent of Nude Nuns With Big Guns? The mass copyright infringement lawsuit may not include your name after all.

Are you tall enough to take this ride? Ron English U.S. Mexico border prank

Cows kill more people in America than sharks.

Lily Allen's new clothing line is making vintage clothes.

BFD: Obama is going to run for a second term in office.

2011 is officially the year of the coup. Ivory Coast.

On this day in 1931 a teenaged girl named Jackie Mitchell struck out Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth one after another, in an exhibition game.


V.19 No.49 | 12/9/2010
Albuquerque Artist Ernest Doty paints a mural behind The Sunshine Theater on Wednesday. The mural is the last one sanctioned by 516 ARTS as part of STREET ARTS: A Celebration of Hip Hop Culture. He is standing on a lift about 50 feet off the ground.
[click to enlarge]
John Bear

Arts

Random Street Art: Number Three

Ernest Doty high above downtown

[ Wed Dec 8 2010 3:08 PM ]

V.19 No.47 | 11/25/2010
Albuquerque Artist Evan Stoker painted “X-Ray Guy” on the back of Bernies Fabrics and Notions on Main Street and Reinken Blvd. in Belen. The piece is part of a larger mural on all sides of the building.
John Bear

Arts

Random piece of street art: number two

Brain in Belen