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V.25 No.5 | 02/04/2016
via arc-a.org

Sustainable Local Agriculture at Casa San Ysidro

On Saturday, February 13 at 1:30pm the public is invited to a free program,
"Food, Farms, Friends," explaining the new partnership between three valued community organizations—NM Land Conservancy, the ARCA and Casa San Ysidro—designed to promote sustainable local agriculture.

This year, ARCA will commence farming the nearly two acre Heritage Field at Casa San Ysidro, fulfilling the Museum's intent to preserve New Mexican heritage by allowing the Museum to keep the Heritage Field agriculturally productive and expand Casa San Ysidro's educational programming and community involvement to include local agriculture.

The program is co-hosted by the Corrales Historical Society and will be held in the Old Church located across the street from Casa San Ysidro: The Gutierrez/Minge House (973 Old Church, Corrales) From 1pm-4pm. Free open house tours and blacksmithing demonstrations at the historic Casa San Ysidro. The public is invited to learn more about these three organizations and explore the history of agriculture in the Rio Abajo area of New Mexico.

For more information about this program and the historic Casa San Ysidro, visit cabq.gov/casasanysidro.

V.22 No.17 | 4/25/2013
3453 New Mexico 14 by Bill Stengle

Architecture

“Green” Living

Modern Home Tours brings sustainable homes to New Mexico

By Mark Lopez [ Fri Apr 19 2013 3:20 PM ]

Frank Lloyd Wright once said that “every great architect is—necessarily—a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.” Given that we live in a state that stresses the importance of sustainable living and eco-friendly promise, the field of architecture has progressed with the trends of becoming environmentally viable.

So, you might ask what are some of the ways that people can become more “green,” seeing as how it's not only a topic of conversation equalling the new “Kardashians” episode, but an actual concern that's permeating the atmosphere, so to speak.

Based in Austin, Texas, Matt Swinney and James Leasure started the Modern Home Tour in 2011 in an effort to combine beautiful architecture with sustainable living. Using the likes of floor-to-ceiling windows to bring in natural light and using solar panels, rather than wasteful air conditioning units, to power the home, these little casitas are aimed and designed at giving people a fresh look at living to protect our future.

“I think that the simple fact is that resources are limited and the population is growing,” Leasure said. “A lot of the really advanced architecture and modern design can help us achieve that.”

Now, the idea of sustainable living isn't without its arguments. Having spoken to several people about the idea of sustainable living, some feel that the idea of trying to promote eco-friendly measures is something that is simply delaying the inevitable. Because of the limited resources, and the idea that the world is crumbling little by little, it would be easy to argue that the actions of a few can hardly outweigh those of the majority.

“In order to take a step, you have to take half a step, and in order to take half a step, you have to take a quarter step,” Leasure said. “There is some value here, and that's sort of our goal, that we show people that this can be interesting and attractive, and even if they won't do it for your fellow man, they can at least see this as being interesting and beautiful.”

And beauty does seem to be one of the main tenets of what Modern Home Tours hopes to achieve. Using geothermal heating and cooling as well as rainwater collection to reuse and recycle what nature gives us, they are showcasing million-dollar homes for people to see how modernity can be beneficial, and how people can use these benefits to advance their home to not only be sustainably sound, but also to educate and teach about how recycling and living green can prolong our future.

But, it seems somewhat ridiculous that people would be able to afford homes of this magnitude, much less adopt the ideas of living green as a measure of everyday life. From looking at these homes, it appears that the ideas of sustainable living can only cater to those who have fat wallets. But Leasure assures that while these homes are somewhat expensive, the ideas aren't.

“The quirks are very acceptable,” Leasure said. “If you take something like that [sustainable living and geothermal cooling] and put them in a new house that doesn't have to have a modern design, you can see that this becomes a real and tangible thing.”

Modern Home Tours will showcase their “green” homes in Taos, N.M. on Saturday, April 27 and in Santa Fe, N.M. on Sunday, April 28, both days from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Advance tickets are $30 and include both days of the tour, or you can purchase tickets the day of the tours for $40. Children 12 and under get in for free. For home addresses and more information, you can visit newmexico.modernhometours.com.

V.20 No.26 | 6/30/2011
Kathy Isaacson tends an Urban Garden.
Mina Yamashita

Mina's Dish

The Urban Store

Green living sprouts up from the concrete

By Mina Yamashita

The Urban Store has been open since January and is the brainchild of Kathy Isaacson and co-owner Chuck Alex. The Nob Hill shop, on Silver, is deceptively ordinary. Issacson sports a T-shirt bearing the store’s working philosophy—“grow, eat, return.” How simple is that?

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V.20 No.24 | 6/16/2011

Food for Thought

American Sardine

When tiny fish are hugely sustainable

By Ari LeVaux

A seafood meal is the one opportunity most Americans will ever have to eat a wild animal. Given the illegality of selling wild game, only hunters and their lucky friends get to munch the many tasty beasts that roam the boondocks. Eating a wild thing is like walking around in bare feet. It's exposure to an ecosystem, and a direct connection with the planet. Eating wild fish is like a swim in the ocean—except in this case, the ocean swims inside of you.

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V.19 No.44 | 11/4/2010
Foodies followed their noses to the eighth annual Salone del Gusto, part of the Slow Food convention held in Turin, Italy.
Courtesy of salonedelgusto.it

Food for Thought

The Snail on Steroids

Slow Food’s global meeting of the minds ... and bellies

By Ari LeVaux

Special series: The Alibi’s resident food columnist Ari LeVaux reports from Italy for a few issues. First up, he covers the biennial Slow Food convention held Oct. 21 through 25 in Turin. Buon appetito!

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