alibi.com
Weekly Alibi Podcast
Alibi Bucks

water


V.25 No.16 | 04/21/2016

Literature

UNM Landscape Prof at Page 1

Press Release [ Fri Apr 29 2016 10:00 AM ]

Baker H. Morrow, professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of N.M., will be at Page One Books at 3pm on Sunday, May 1, to talk about and sign his updated non-fiction effort, Best Plants for New Mexico Gardens and Landscapes: Keyed to Cities and Regions in New Mexico and Adjacent Areas, Revised and Expanded Edition.

The book is described as such: "First published in 1995, this invaluable guide to the trees, shrubs, ground covers, and smaller plants that thrive in New Mexico's many life zones and growing areas is now available in a long-awaited new edition. Landscape architect Baker H. Morrow considers the significant factors that impact planting in New Mexico—including soil conditions, altitude, drought, urban expansion, climate change, and ultraviolet radiation—to provide the tools for successful gardens and landscapes in the state. Added photographs and sketches identify the forms and uses of plants, including many new species that have become widely available in the region since the 1990s. The latest recommendations for specific cities and towns include more photos for ease of reference, and botanical names have also been updated. With ingenuity and efficient water management, Morrow demonstrates how to create landscapes that provide shade, color, oxygen, soil protection, windscreening and outdoor enjoyment."

Morrow, Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects, has been a principal of Morrow Reardon Wilkinson Miller, Ltd., Landscape Architects for the past 36 years. Morrow is Professor of Practice of Landscape Architecture at the University of New Mexico (since 1975), where he is the founder of the MLA program in the School of Architecture and Planning. A third-generation New Mexican, he is the author of a number of books, including Best Plants for New Mexico Gardens and Landscapes and A Dictionary of Landscape Architecture, and the co-editor of Canyon Gardens: The Ancient Pueblo Landscapes of the American Southwest. Morrow is an award-winning landscape architect, experienced at working with stakeholders on pressing issues in both English and Spanish. He and his firm have received over 90 design awards and citations since 1980. Practicing in New Mexico and the surrounding area, he has served as project manager and principal in charge for more than 3000 projects. Among Professor Morrow’s award winning projects are the Journal Center, the New Mexico State Fairgrounds entries, Park Square, Dietz Farm Plaza, Children’s Psychiatric Center at UNM, St. Joseph Square, the Albuquerque Academy, and Yale Boulevard in Albuquerque.

Page One Books is located at 5850 Eubank NE, Suite B-41, in Albuquerque's Mountain Run Shopping Center (southeast corner of Eubank and Juan Tabo). The Morrow event is free and open to the public. For more information, please call 294-2026 or visit www.page1book.com.

V.25 No.16 | 4/21/2016
Gila
Illo by Brie Macquarrie

Environment

The Last Wild River

Gila River diversion project seeks to secure water for New Mexico at any cost

By Maggie Grimason
Diverting the Gila River seems a desperate attempt to stake a claim on the river's waters before Arizona beats us to it.
hazard
Illo by Brie Macquarrie

Environment

Keep It Wet & Sludgy

By Joshua Lee
Albuquerque’s water supply is not only limited, but also at risk of contamination.
V.25 No.11 | 03/17/2016

News

The Daily Word in Transparency, Private Prisons and Chemical Spills

By Peter Karlsen [ Sat Mar 19 2016 5:31 PM ]
The Daily Word

Read about the state senator responsible for the lottery scholarship.

A south valley couple shares their experiences with living in a neighborhood that bares a disproportionate burden of industrial pollution.

A private prison for noncitizens has likely been providing inmates inadequate medical care.

New Mexico is home to the country's largest methane cloud, but new rules may help alleviate it.

Looks like the New Mexico Legislature is refusing to provide the Attorney General records for criminal investigation of a retired state senator.

But that's not the only questionable thing going on with our local and state officials.

The New Mexico Environmental Department disagrees with KUNM's continuing coverage of a plume toxic dry cleaning chemicals in the ground water in some downtown neighborhoods.

V.25 No.6 | 02/11/2016

Literature

What Makes a Snowflake?

Press Release [ Wed Feb 17 2016 12:41 PM ]
A local author visits Page One Books to read his new children's book on snowflakes.
V.25 No.2 | 01/14/2016
morguefile.com

Event Horizon

Sleeping with the Fishes

Friday, Jan 15: Aquarium Overnight: Snooze with Sea Turtles

By Cerridwen Stucky [ Fri Jan 15 2016 1:30 PM ]
Explore the aquarium at night and learn about ocean animals and their nighttime behavior. Visit the touchpool, play a game, get crafty and more.
Google Earth icon Map Icon
V.25 No.1 | 01/07/2016

News

The Daily Word in REAL ID, Bosque Trails and dinosaur lovin'

By Peter Karlsen [ Sat Jan 9 2016 7:14 PM ]
The Daily Word

The REAL ID can got kicked further down the street, at least for airports.

The city is asking for comment on where the new trail should run. If and how wide are already decided, so stifle those complaints.

New Mexico's less shitty teen pregnancy rate isn't reflected in rural communities.

Insurance companies failing to pay the Department of Health for vaccines has doctors turning away patients.

An Oklahoma company is pushing for a zoning exemption to begin drilling for oil in Rio Rancho.

Arizona and the US Department of the Interior are making plans for a diversion of the Gila river that threatens its ecology.

Babe I love you, but I'm a T-Rex

V.24 No.45 | 11/05/2015

Flash Fiction

The Scouts

By August March [ Wed Nov 4 2015 8:05 PM ]

Freeman had a good idea of what was going to go on later that night, but didn't let on until he was sure his father had passed out in the living room from a twelve pack of Lowenbrau Dark and the stress that comes from designing nuclear weapons for a living.

He crept out into the garage, yanked down the back gate of the old man's red and white FJ55 and dragged the inflatable raft out the storage bay. Duck feathers and dog hair went flying everywhere, but finally the raft was on the cement floor.

He went back in for a moment and made sure Harold was comfortable, threw a blanket over him for effect, while the old master snored and snored away. Then he got on the phone, dragging the handset—and the ten foot coiled plastic cord that followed it everywhere—into a pantry by the kitchen, for privacy.

On the other end of a connection made possible by manipulating a rotating plastic wheel with the index finger, Alexander listened intently while Freeman layed out his idea: They were going to climb up on top of the big water tank that was nestled in the foothills by the high school.

Using stealth, a pair of bolt cutters taken from shop class—while Mr. Duran was hamming it up on the table saw—and of course, Harold's prized hunting raft, they were going to float around and maybe even take a swim in the largest artificial body of water either Eagle Scout could ever imagine.

Alexander's folks were running some sort of high-gravity-atomic-laser experiment at the lab on that particular evening, so he saw absolutely nothing wrong with the plan, and in fact sort of admired its simplicity.

Alex locked Arcoiris the retriever in the back bedroom and grabbed the keys to his van. It was a forest green Dodge that comfortably sat eight. Alexander and his friends called it the Congo van, mostly because they imagined one day taking it on a road trip to Africa or somewhere thereabouts.

Before he got to Freeman's pad, he stopped at Sherri's place, which was only two doors down. It was a sprawling ranch-style with a weeping willow and heaps of lava rock in front. He convinced Sherri and her pal Barbara to join in on the action. The two gals climbed out a bedroom window.

Both of them lit up Salems as they took a seat in the very back of the Dodge. Put on KFMG Sherri said, they are playing a special on the new Pink Floyd album. Alexander grimaced and spit out the window. He already heard Animals; it sucked. So, he tuned the radio to KRST instead, and started headbanging to some song or other about a Green Manalishi. The group drove by Allsups and picked up a dozen burritos and a twelve pack of Jolt Cola for luck.

By this time, Freeman was waiting out in the drive way, had folded the inflatable raft into a lumpy bundle. He was anxious to get going and when Alexander arrived, ran up to the Congo van and started shouting about how they didn't have all night and for crissakes, why'd he bring Sherri and Barbara along?

Just in case the unexpected happens, said Alexander, plus which, both of them can drive a five speed and that ought to count for something.

It was no trouble climbing up to the top of the water tank, hell there was even a staircase. Sherri and Barbara stayed in the van with a walkie talkie, six of the Jolts, and all of the burritos. That was meant to be a reward to be bestowed when Alexander and Freeman returned, wetly triumphant.

As Freeman cut the chains that locked the door at the very top of the tank, Alexander dragged the raft into position. Once past the gate, they lugged the raft and a 50 foot rappelling rope over the top. At the center of the tank there was a simple but awfully large metal grate. They struggled to lift the grate. Finally it gave way and rolled off the tower, clanging and tolling like a church bell when it hit the asphalt below.

Alexander made a bowline knot around one of the stair-railings and threw the rope down into the dark hole. Freeman hit the inflate button and tossed the raft down there too. Both of the scouts activated their flashlights and left their hiking boots at the edge of the water tower's maw. Freeman stared at his watch.

Alexander got on the walkie talkie. Barbara and Sherri were on the other side, parked down the road a ways, by the Temple of the Nazarene. He told them if they didn't hear back in exactly two minutes, one of them ought to come up the stairs with the flare gun while the other drives over to Fire Station 16 to tell what happened.

V.22 No.45 | 11/7/2013

news

The Daily Word in Lizard People, Nostril Ticks and Street Apes

By Carl Petersen [ Fri Nov 1 2013 11:46 AM ]
The Daily Word

They found a fancy secret railway tunnel between San Diego and Tijuana.

Chinese submarines can get us.

An angry bar brawler brandished a chainsaw.

The determined mouse struggled with his cracker.

Here’s my vote for coolest Halloween candy.

What’s the most popular Halloween candy?

Bone up on blood sucking with this TED-Ed vampire cartoon.

Should we build a Death Star?

Do lizard people run the government?

We’re closer to understanding why warm water freezes faster than cold water.

Create your own drug.

Watch out for nostril ticks.

The Bulldogs win at losing.

Somebody stole a donation box from Donut Mart.

Spend some time with the street apes of Jakarta.

V.22 No.37 |

news

The Daily Word in ferret bans, molasses spills and coal slides

By Ty Bannerman [ Wed Sep 18 2013 9:22 AM ]
The Daily Word

Admission to the State Fair is free for everyone today! Go eat something fried!

Two days after the Navy Yard shootings, the usual idiots are saying the usual idiotic things. Things like "False flag," "crisis actors," "Obama," and "conspiracy."

A muddy coal slide, or perhaps a coal-y mud slide, slopped its way through Madrid, NM on Sunday night.

But it's water that's resumed flowing for residents of Jal, NM.

A Tennessee judge has ruled that it's okay to name your baby "Messiah." Just in case you want your kid to have that particular reason to hate you for the rest of their life.

A pipeline pumping molasses from Hawaii to California, which is totally a real thing, ruptured last week, spilling 233,000 gallons of the delicious-but-fish-killing substance into the ocean.

And, as of yesterday, you may no longer bring ferrets into Arizona restaurants. Miniature horses are still cool, though.

V.22 No.29 |

news

The Daily Word in roll-coaster mishaps, a royal baby and Carlsbad farmers

By Mark Lopez [ Mon Jul 22 2013 11:20 AM ]
The Daily Word

Something royal this way comes ...

Police have identified one of three murder victims in East Cleveland, and they've charged 35-year-old Michael Madison with three counts of aggravated murder.

German roller-coaster manufacturer is sending experts to Arlington, Texas to investigate the death of a victim who died while riding the Texas Giant over the weekend.

Mohammed Morsi, recently ousted president of Egypt, has gone missing, and family claims he was "abducted by army."

Police are investigating the drowning of 19-year-old Matthew Mares in Los Lunas that happened over the weekend.

APD to testify today in court in a wrongful death lawsuit in relation to the shooting of 27-year-old Christopher Torres in 2011.

Carlsbad farmers could possibly receive less than half the water allotted to them from a network of wells that pump groundwater into the Pecos river.

In a nutshell: If you fake cancer and take $9,000 in donations from your community, then you're probably gonna go to jail.

V.22 No.26 |

news

The Daily Word in Arizona firefighters, New Mexico water plan and meth in the pelvis

By Mark Lopez [ Mon Jul 1 2013 10:04 AM ]
The Daily Word

An Arizona wildfire claims the lives of 19 firefighters.

Zimmerman trial update: The jury was able to listen to Zimmerman's interview tape from the night of the Trayvon Martin shooting, which could give clues as to who the "aggressor" was.

Europe wants to know if the U.S. has been bugging them ... otherwise, we can kiss that trans-Atlantic free trade agreement bye-bye.

Sen. Karen Peterson and her partner, Vikki Bandy, become first same-sex couple to legally marry in Delaware!

Wait a minute ... so that's one well (or spring) for 290 water systems? So, what's plan B?

New Mexico orders another trial for Manuel Turrietta, who was convicted for killing Alberto Sandoval in 2006 in a gang-related shooting.

Ashley Browder's memorial banner taken down from the corner of Paseo Del Norte and Eagle Ranch Road.

Wow Claudia! That's a whole pound of meth! How'd you get that in there?

Hello sir, I believe this arm is yours ...

V.22 No.25 |

news

The Daily Word in sea monkey collections, gay marriage and Wendy Davis

By Ty Bannerman [ Wed Jun 26 2013 9:45 AM ]
The Daily Word

The Rio Grande has become way less grande.

And county employees are broiling in their building.

A Las Vegas, NM school district ruins it for everyone. Because somebody wrote its name down wrong.

The Supreme Court went gay! Let's all get married!

Texas hero-lady Wendy Davis successfully fights for reproductive rights and shows everyone how a filibuster is really done.

A Florida entomologist found the wasp boss-level.

Here's a dude who collects all the crap they used to sell in the back of old comic books. I love this dude.

V.22 No.23 | 6/6/2013

The Mouthful

Bite-sized Roundup

Our monthly sampler platter of news from around the state

By Nora Hickey
A sampler platter of food news from around the state.
If you own property in this green wedge, you can vote.

news

MRGCD election Tuesday, June 4

It’s all about the water

By Barron Jones [ Mon Jun 3 2013 10:09 AM ]

Property owners in several New Mexico counties will head to the polls this Tuesday to elect board members for the agency that regulates the usage of the water trickling down the Rio Grande from Sandoval to Socorro counties.

The Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District (MRGCD) is holding the election so that verified property owners can select board members for positions three and four in Bernalillo County and positions six and seven in Socorro and Sandoval counties, respectively. 

Nearly all the candidates agree that the most troubling issues facing the MRGCD is the area’s lack of water.

Incumbent Adrian Oglesby said persistent drought conditions over the past three years makes this one of the most important elections since the district was formed nearly 100 years ago. 

“The next four years will be critical, we are in the worst drought we ever seen, our reservoirs are functionally empty and we have huge infrastructure issues,” Oglesby said. “So the next four years we need really intelligent leadership to make sure the district survives.” 

The MRGCD with its 200 employees and $20 million budget is responsible for upkeep of drainage ditches, levees and canals along the Rio Grande from Cochiti Dam to Bosque Del Apache Wildlife Refuge. The district is also responsible for delivering water to nearly 60,000 acres of farmland for farms of all sizes, ranging from one-acre family plots to 900-acre commercial farming operations.

Oglesby said that in the past the MRGCD has relied on stored water to irrigate those farmlands, but aggressive drought conditions has him projecting that the stored water will run dry in early July. He added that water reserve depletion would amount to some pretty substantial losses and a big hit to the middle valley economy. 

“If that happens we are obligated to shut off water to everyone but the pueblos that have very senior water rights.  They have a small portion of water being held for that, and once that water runs out, then farming stops until it start raining again,” Oglesby said.

Jim Roberts is facing incumbent Karen Dunning for Position No. 3 in Bernalillo County. Adrian Oglesby will face challenger Louis Trujillo for Position No. 4 in Bernalillo County.  A third candidate, Andrew Leo Lopez died May 28. Lopez will remain on the ballot, and if he wins board members will appoint someone to take his seat. 

David Lorenzo C’ de Baca is challenging incumbent Derrick Lente for Sandoval County Position No. 7 and Chris Sichler faces challenger Jericho Sanchez for Socorro County’s Position No. 6. 

The nearly 80,000 eligible voters can cast their ballots at any one of 26 polling locations throughout Bernalillo, Sandoval, and Socorro counties. Unlike most elections, voters must show a driver’s license or state ID to cast their ballots because of a property rights requirement for voting.  Those who can’t supply ID or prove property ownership at the polls will be issued a provisional ballot.  

The MRGCD was formed in the mid-1920s primarily to drain ground water from farmlands in the Atrisco and Old Town areas of the city. However, a couple of years later, the District added irrigation to its list of responsibilities.

View desktop version