alibi.com
Best of Burque Restaurants Voting
Alibi Bucks

white


V.25 No.33 | 08/18/2016

Calendar

You're Invited!

The Great White Buffalo of Parties

By Courtney Foster [ Fri Aug 19 2016 4:43 PM ]

Questions: Do you like secrets? Do you like fun? Is there anything cooler than being included in a super fun secret?
Answers: Secrets and fun are awesome and there's nothing more satisfying than being in on a sweet hush-hush underground party.
Registration for the secret party of the year has just opened and now you have the chance to be one of the secret elite. Founded in France nearly 30 years ago, Diner en Blanc is an exclusive “white party” pop-up picnic that happens once a year. The magically decorated location is revealed only when participants load up on the bus. Tickets are limited and can be hard to come by, but follow these small steps, buy a white outfit, and become way cooler than all your friends.

Step 1: Find a date! Tickets are sold in pairs so you'll need a partner for this party.
Step 2: Register online at http://albuquerque.dinerenblanc.info/register.
Step 3: Buy an all white outfit and table cloth, and start planning your meal. Since this is a pop-up event, guests are required to pack their own dinner.
Step 3: After Phase One Registration is over, invites will be sent out and the waiting list will be called upon.

Don't miss your chance to be a part of the coolest secret of the year.

V.25 No.18 | 05/05/2016

The Daily Word in Millennials, Art and David Cameron

By Megan Reneau [ Thu May 5 2016 12:00 PM ]
The Daily Word

I don't know why anyone is surprised that Beyonce performed in North Carolina when she's kind of ignored the LGBT community in the past.

People will no longer be jailed if they aren't able to pay court fines in Colorado Springs.

Millennials are so _________.

By white men, for white men.”

If you don a sombrero, a fake mustache or utter “Cinco de Drinko” today (or ever) please don't talk to me.

This doctor said the hospital she works at told her not to talk about abortions with her patients.


David Cameron respects Donald Trump. I think we can agree that the UK and the US are in the shitter right now.

This feminist artist makes jabs at famous artists.

V.22 No.29 | 7/18/2013

Music

Story of Her Life: Waxing nostalgic about Loretta Lynn’s Van Lear Rose

By Mark Lopez [ Wed Jul 17 2013 2:34 PM ]

It's been almost a decade since Loretta Lynn's last record, Van Lear Rose, hit the shelves. A lot has gone down in those nine years. We've seen some of the worst natural disasters in history (BP anyone?), and we've also seen a further-magnified shift from music being played on LP devices to almost exclusively digital formats. Yet that's one of the great things about a record—it has the power to take you back. Back to where? That depends on the person, but the whole premise of a good album rests on the fact it doesn't lose its touch as the casing weathers or when the charts don't signify its importance, as it once did.

So, why is Loretta Lynn's latest record so important? Take for instance the fact that she released the album when she was 72. And, instead of having country music aficionados take the reins in the production booth, she enlisted the help of contemporary garage-rocker Jack White (most famous then for his work in The White Stripes). Seeing these two walk down the red carpet at the Grammys together might seem odd out of context, but having listened to the album, it makes perfect sense. The bond created during the recording of these 13 tracks isn't something that disappears once the lights go out and the track is deemed fit for airplay. Because if you listen to this record, you can hear the molding of this friendship manifest in the way Lynn sings—with the same vibrant twang that made her a household country name—and the way White offers a rock and roll background, letting Loretta shine amidst electric guitars, booming drums and the quieter, softer moments; see “Miss Being Mrs.”

Van Lear Rose is one of those albums that are meant to be played all the way through—no skipping. It tells a story: from the time Lynn was a girl, sitting with her coal miner father, listening to him tell the story of how he met her mother (“Van Lear Rose”) to reflecting on what made her life so joyous, but at the same time wondering where it all leads (“Story of My Life”). Looking back, I'm not surprised it won the Grammy Award for Best Country Album or ended up in the top 10 of so many year-end “best of” lists. It's a gem. Simple as that.

Part of the reason the album hit so hard is that Loretta Lynn is still that hard-talking, freewheeling, lovable woman she started out as—with her classic hit “Coal Miner's Daughter” and other notable songs like “You Ain't Woman Enough” and “Rated 'X.'” Even in her golden years, she is the same person, and she covers the same emotional ground that made her famous in the first place, ie. cheating husbands, childbirth and motherhood and struggling to make ends meet. Just listen to tracks like “Mrs. Leroy Brown” or “Family Tree,” where she takes her kids to the home of the woman their dad is cheating with and asks the husband to come out and see what he's doing to their family. That's real talk.

But it’s an album that couldn't exist without the confluence of measure. What I mean by that is the importance of knowing your limits and knowing when to let someone help out. I’m not saying Lynn has limits; maybe she does, but they're not shown on this record, and she wrote all the songs. But she knows when to let White work in his expertise, particularly on lead single “Portland, Oregon.” A drunken love song in every sense of the word, the lead guitar moves through the track like a forceful river yet calms down enough for the duo to shine—while asking the bartender for one more sloe gin fizz and “a pitcher to go.”

But don't take my word for it. I'm not even that into country music, but I’ve had a soft spot for Loretta Lynn since I watched Coal Miner's Daughter as a toddler. She was just one of those singer/songwriters who always had a presence in my childhood. This is not only one of the best albums of 2004. This is one of the best albums ever recorded, and I’ll stand by that like a man whose britches are in sync with love for all kinds of music. It’s a masterpiece. Enough said.

V.18 No.30 | 7/23/2009

Bite

By Alex Brown and Evan George

It is gazpacho season. Don't know if you've ever noticed, but very few recipes as simple as "buy vegetables, blend and chill" inspire such strong preferences as this iconic cold soup. (We give props to the oil-laden, paprika-orange smoothie variety over the chunky salsa in a bowl style, but hey, that's just us.)

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

NEWSLETTERS Great Alibi stories, events and deals delivered to your inbox each week. No fooling!
View desktop version