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The Daily Word in a fired canine, a big state error and Jay Leno

It's official! Jay Leno is out, and Jimmy Fallon is in! Well … on Feb. 17, he'll be in.

According to an Oregon State University study, Chinook salmon use Earth's magnetic field to navigate where their ancestral feeding grounds are located.

The Sochi Olympics 2014 are underway, and you can read live tweets and get links to footage here … or pretty much anywhere on the interwebz.

Melvin Morse faces charges of assault and endangerment for apparently waterboarding his 12-year-old stepdaughter as well as pouring vomit over her head, stuffing food in her mouth and denying her toilet breaks.

Rio Rancho resident Angelique Iradella was denied a renewal of her nurse's assistant license, was turned down for three jobs and had an instance of abuse on her public nursing record, all due to a state error.

Mt. Taylor is a “traditional cultural property.”

New “Omaree's Law” bill would require the state to take custody of children showing injuries of abuse and would require parents to go through counseling before getting their kids back.

A former WWII colonel and Albuquerque resident still has two paintings he confiscated from Nazi Germany.

Poor little police pooch got fired for being lazy on the job. Sorry Fred.

news

The Daily Word in Coca-Cola's vault, Bernalillo same-sex hearing and "sex boxes" in Switzerland

The United States and Britain team up to show Syria's government that when you “cross a line” (referring to a gas attack that killed at least 355 people, though some reports have stated the death toll was over 1,000), the world is going to get involved.

Police in Spokane, Wash., have arrested a second teenage suspect in the fatal beating of 88-year-old Delbert Belton, who was a WWII veteran.

After being found guilty last week for the Fort Hood shooting spree four years ago, the sentencing phase of Maj. Nidal Hasan's trial starts today.

There's a Coca-Cola vault? I want to go to there.

In preparation for a hearing this afternoon on same-sex marriage, Bernalillo County Clerk Maggie Toulouse Oliver has printed 1,000 same-sex marriage licenses.

Kids at Joy Junction learn how to capture their wishes and dreams with a camera via the Pictures of Hope program.

Mayor Richard Berry's office initiates the "Equity in Pay Task Force," aimed at closing the wage gap between men and women.

For those who find themselves taking long drives and suddenly getting the urge to have sex, Zurich, Switzerland now has “sex boxes” where people can drive up and give it a go. It's also safer for the prostitutes.

And now, the big question: Do we really want to see a John Lennon clone?

V.22 No.31 | 8/1/2013

Book Review

Fashioning a Little Prince’s Infidelity

Studio Saint-Ex

Set in New York during the onset of WWII, Ania Szado’s novel follows a love triangle involving Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, author of The Little Prince.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

News

Japanese American history in New Mexico

Easter, 1941: Roy Ebihara (at far left, with siblings Mary, Kathy and Bill) was part of a tight-knit Japanese community living in Clovis, N.M. After Japan declared war, the families were threatened by neighbors and forced to move to a small camp in Lincoln County. They were finally interned at Topaz Relocation Center in Utah.
Courtesy of Roy Ebihara
Easter, 1941: Roy Ebihara (at far left, with siblings Mary, Kathy and Bill) was part of a tight-knit Japanese community living in Clovis, N.M. After Japan declared war, the families were threatened by neighbors and forced to move to a small camp in Lincoln County. They were finally interned at Topaz Relocation Center in Utah.

Though a lifelong New Mexican, I had no idea before reporter Margaret Wright embarked onthis story that our state was home to internment camps for Japanese Americans during WWII.

Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is working to rectify that kind of widespread cultural ignorance. Salazar has been speaking about how minority history is largely left out of monuments countrywide. Less than 3 percent of the United States’ landmarks are dedicated to minority groups.

The National Park Service is offering grants to people looking to memorialize sites within their communities. The Japanese American Citizens’ League of New Mexico secured funding to recognize the camps in New Mexico.

V.21 No.39 | 9/27/2012
Easter, 1941: Roy Ebihara (at far left, with siblings Mary, Kathy and Bill) was part of a tight-knit Japanese community living in Clovis, N.M. After Japan declared war, the families were threatened by neighbors and forced to move to a small camp in Lincoln County. They were finally interned at Topaz Relocation Center in Utah.
Courtesy of Roy Ebihara

News Feature

Dark Days of Detention

The legacy of Japanese American internment in New Mexico

Advocacy group raises awareness about internment camps during WWII in our state.

[ more >> ] [ permalink ]

news

The Daily Word featuring Twitter growing up, Libya going crazy, South Park creators getting Mormon

A New York Times photographer was taken hostage and sexually assaulted in Libya. She took some incredible photos.

Already, this ridiculous Libyan faux-conflict is already costing several billion dollars.

This man brought an open can of beer to his DWI court appearance.

The Quran is found “guilty,” burned in a Florida church.

Get ready for Trey Parker and Matt Stone’s Broadway musical “The Book of Mormon.”

People are signing an online petition to have Apple remove a “gay cure” app.

This Albuquerque man went in to cardiac arrest and later died after being tased by police.

So that’s where my WWII-era machine gun went...

This man was so pissed off that Taco Bell burritos went up in price, he started firing at police. They’re not real anyway, dude.

Stand by Me? These kids in Texas find a human skull while fishing.

OMG, it’s Twitter’s fifth birthday!

...And this N.C. historian is telling the story of the Civil War through Twitter.

Timewaster

The Downfall of 420 Hangovers

While April 20 is mainly known for clouds of marijuana smoke, a lesser-known fact about the day is that it was the birthday of the modern world's most evil dictator. As mentioned in yesterday's DayBird, April 20, 1889 was the day German Fuhrer Adolf Hitler began his maniacal career that brought Europe to the brink of destruction and back. Now that you've sobered up, perhaps now is the time to transition from revelry to revelation, and the following works can help shed a little light on the fascinating history of Nazi Germany and World War II.

Downfall, 2004 film

The movie that inspired all those parody videos of Hitler ranting about his Xbox Live account, the proliferation of the parody videos and everything in between (I even made one about the polio vaccine for a biology project) is not only an exceptional vehicle for humor but also a great film itself. Downfall (German title: Der Untergang) covers the last days of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany and is set in the underground bunker that hid Hitler and other Nazi officials as Berlin fell to the Allied forces above. The movie is based on the memoirs of numerous people familiar with the last days of Nazi Germany, including Hitler's personal secretary and Germany's Minister of Armaments and War Production during World War II. It also probably holds the record for most suicides in a feature film, as the latter part of Downfall consists of a string of Nazi officers and soldiers taking their own lives rather than facing the consequences of the Nazi reign of terror. The film, ranked 81 on the IMDb’s Top 250 films (based on user votes) and a Metacritic.com score of 82, “indicating universal acclaim,” offers a dramatic, powerful look at a story not often told.

blog

Seventy Years Ago Today

The Nazis marching into Warsaw. Contrary to current belief, they did not do this to force upon the Poles universal health care.
The Nazis marching into Warsaw. Contrary to current belief, they did not do this to force upon the Poles universal health care.

On Sept. 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland under the pretense of having been attacked by the Poles (it was staged by Nazis). This is generally regarded as being the beginning of World War II. Tens of millions of people would be killed in Europe and Asia before the end of the war.

Here is the British poet W.H. Auden’s poem “September 1, 1939” about the break-out of the war.

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