Alibi V.15 No.12 • March 23-29, 2006 

Music Magnified

Dead on Point 5, The Blastamottos, Ten Seconds to Liftoff, Darlington Horns

Ten Seconds to Liftoff
Ten Seconds to Liftoff

Friday, March 24, Atomic Cantina (21-and-over); Free: There are music fans and there are genre fans. Genre fans listen to the same stuff repeatedly until they finally burn out and cash in their record collections to buy a suit for their new lifestyle job. Tonight is for the music fans. Rather than your tired, typical bill of four bands all playing the same formula metal or garage, these groups have little in common except musical passion.

Darlington Horns are a shoot-’em-up bar band, light years away from earlier drunk 'n' roll incarnations as the Impatients and Back Seat Rockers. Sure, they can still pull off a song like "Guardian Angel (of the Alcoholics)," but are the sort that would carry on with glorified Exile On Main Street twang even as a bar fight erupts and empties crash over their heads.

From Las Cruces, Ten Seconds to Liftoff are powerhouse sleeves-torn-off-the-T-shirt muscle rock joined with party-down punk and grinding stud riffage. If Ten Seconds died in a fiery plane crash like so many of their rocker heroes, they would be best remembered by the signature tune, "Flip That Record Over." They're led by one of our ex-local boys, Screaming Biff Bunting. Start the countdown.

Also from the LC, the Blastamottos are known for frontman Kenta Henmi, ex-Jonnycats, blistering punkabilly from Burque over a decade ago. He's not resting on his laurels, however. There's still some rock 'n' billy, but the emphasis is on the rockyroll with a lick of Johnny Cash country boogie.

The roar and rumble of Dead On Point Five is led by Dom, longtime local mad saint formerly of the mighty Jacobins, Feltch and many more. Not metal, not quite hardcore but natural disaster rock, like a storm-drenched avalanche, crushing the hapless villagers below. Keep an eye on the drummer. Tim's the guy that locked himself in his bedroom with a drum kit at 14 and didn't emerge until he could pound, roll and fill like Neil Peart or John Bonham.

Longtime local musicians and an attitude adjustment each set—what more could you ask?