Alibi V.17 No.5 • Jan 31-Feb 6, 2008 
Dan Zanes and a wee friend

Music to Your Ears

I Kid You Not

"My biggest fear as a parent," confesses a first-time father and YouTube documentarian, "was that I would have to spend the next several years of my life listening to Barney or The Wiggles." He was spared that fate, he says, by Dan Zanes, a Brooklynite folk-rocker who crafts children's music that parents are equally mad for. On Dan Zanes and Friends’ 2006 Catch That Train!—probably the first “children’s music” disc you could pick up at Starbucks, thanks to a deal with the coffee juggernaut's Hear Music entertainment division—Zanes' friends include Nick Cave, The Kronos Quartet, Natalie Merchant and The Blind Boys of Alabama. When Zanes plays the National Hispanic Cultural Center this Wednesday, Feb. 6, his friends will be of the home-grown variety (I’m just not sure who, at this point). Bring the wee ones out for this concert. For once, it's not overreaching to say the whole family will enjoy it. Cost is $15 advance, $20 at the door for adults, and $10 advance, $15 at the door for children under 12, through TicketMaster and the NHCC box office (with no service fee, 724-4771). The show starts at 6:30 p.m.

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Roman Numerals

Show Up!

Roman Numerals

Rhythm rock with a breadbasket work ethic

It started as a Joy Division tribute band, but once its members got tired of aping their idols, Roman Numerals set some ground rules.

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Play Youtube Video

Music Interview

A Chat with Wynton Marsalis

The Jazz at Lincoln Center flagship sails in

Over the years, music director, trumpeter and gentleman Wynton Marsalis has maneuvered several smaller craft—a quartet, a quintet and a septet—through New Mexico's jazz waters. Next week, he’ll dock the quindectet Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, the flagship of that New York institution, in Albuquerque for a program of Duke Ellington’s love songs. One thing is for sure: The evening will swing.

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[click to enlarge]

Flyer on the Wall

Drawn Together

A Smile from the Trenches (Grand Junction, Colo.), Bury Your Wings, Brokencyde and Glenn Mara meet up for an all-ages screamy rock sesh this Friday, Feb. 1, at The Compound. $7 gets you in, but be nice and bring cash for a merch purch. (LM)

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Sonic Reducer

Liam Finn I'll Be Lightning · Doomtree False Hopes · The Raveonettes Lust Lust Lust

With so many singer-songwriters out there, perhaps genetics is one surefire way to separate the diamonds from the rough. Liam Finn, son of Crowded House vocalist Neil Finn, has made an album that is simple, quiet and beautiful. The songs are slow to take hold, but once they've crawled inside your brain, they refuse to come out. Acoustic guitar, a swath of synth and straight back-beat drums with Finn's lovely cold-cooing wrap every song in an attractive package. Let's hope Finn's debut is just the tip of his creative iceberg. (SM)

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Eat yer heart out, Louisa May Alcott
Alexander Perrelli

Music Websclusive

Little Women

The band you won't hear live this week

I just got word from Derek Caterwaul that the Little Women show slated for Thursday, Jan. 31, won't be happening—the guitarist developed tendonitis while touring, and won't be driving in for the show. But I did a perfectly good interview with the experimental punky jazz quartet from Brooklyn, and thought I'd tell you about them anyway. Little Women balances tight, turn-on-a-dime changes with a rowdy, frantic energy, a kind of unpolished polish I'll call spit-shined. Take in the frenetic, bursty approach at myspace.com/littlewomensounds. Little Women's first recording, Teeth, will be out March 4 on Gilgongo and Sockets records.

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Courtesy of the Artist

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Special Beat Service

The English Beat • ska

Here's a brief on a band with three names, but unlike Eliot's bunch, these dudes are not a coterie of cats. At home across the pond, they're known as the Beat. In the land down under, kindly refer to them as the British Beat. Here in 'Merica, we call them the English Beat. But no matter what you call them, this estimable ensemble that still includes founder and guitarist Dave Wakeling—but not vocalist Ranking Roger—was partially responsible for the upsurge in popularity that two-tone ska saw on both sides of the Atlantic during the '80s and '90s. …
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