Alibi V.17 No.28 • July 10-16, 2008 

Answer Me This

Which Albuquerque business caught fire? Campaign contributions from a questionable source. Who's being named in a civil suit? And Los Alamos National Labs may be ...

1) Which business was damaged in a suspicious fire?

a. A law firm

b. A doctor's office

c. A car dealership

d. A restaurant

2) A state representative accepted campaign contributions from his ...

a. Estranged father

b. Cat-hoarding mother

c. Imprisoned brother

d. Much cooler sister

3) Who is being named in a DWI civil lawsuit?

a. Bars

b. Restaurants

c. Local breweries

d. Car manufacturers

4) Los Alamos National Labs may be ...

a. Hiring more employees

b. Increasing nuclear pit production

c. Buying another supercomputer

d. Getting tired of seeing its company softball team lose

ANSWERS

1) D. Fire fighters put out a blaze at El Norteño Restaurant (6416 Zuni SE) after the business caught fire on the morning of Monday, July 7. The fire caused major smoke damage to the restaurant. Firefighters say they found evidence of forced entry, which could mean the blaze was set intentionally. The Albuquerque Police Department's fire investigators are looking into the incident.

2) C. Rep. Richard Vigil r eceived campaign contributions from his imprisoned brother. Robert Vigil, former state treasurer, donated $6,000 to his brother's re-election campaign in late June. The Vigils’ family attorney says the contribution is completely legal. Robert Vigil is serving a three-year sentence for attempted extortion.

3) A. Several Downtown bars, including Maloney's, Ned's, Sauce Liquid Lounge, the District and Knockouts, have been named in a DWI lawsuit. The suit claims the establishments served Micah Henry when he was already intoxicated. Henry was arrested and charged with driving drunk and getting into an accident that killed two people on New Year's Eve. The lawsuit was filed by the family of one of the victims.

4) B. Los Alamos National Labs may be producing more nuclear pits—the cores of nuclear warheads. The U.S. Department of Energy has put forth a proposal that would increase pit production from slightly more than 10 to 80 pits per year. The National Nuclear Security Administration says it will decide whether to accept the proposal by the end of the year.