Alibi Bucks

 Apr 1 - 7, 2010 
Sweat to Remember


Sweat to Remember

César Chávez’ daughter lends a hand to the South Valley’s day of service

By Shaun Loretto Griswold

School buses lined the road at Arenal and Lopez in the gray light of early morning. More than 260 children and teens were ready to celebrate the life of César Chávez—with sweat and dirt.

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Thin Line

By Marisa Demarco

Witches Are Not Deadly

Albuquerque makes national headlines for the weirdest things. On Wednesday, March 24, the Washington Post ran a report on the giraffe carcass improperly disposed of in the dumpster behind the Rio Grande Zoo. Around the same time, the story of a woman accused of stabbing and killing a man in the Foothills hit the big time.

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Odds and Ends

Odds & Ends

By Devin D. O’Leary

Dateline: India—A long-standing dispute between India and Bangladesh over possession of an island in the Bay of Bengal has been settled—more or less—by Mother Nature. Oceanographer Sugata Hazra announced that satellite imagery and sea patrols confirm the contentious island has disappeared due to rising sea levels. For nearly 30 years, India and Bangladesh have argued over control of New Moore Island, an uninhabited strip of rock in a disputed coastal area known as the Sunderbans. Hazra, a professor at Jadavpur University in Kolkata, has declared the battle a tie, saying, “What these two countries could not achieve from years of talking has been resolved by global warming.” According to Hazra, sea levels have historically risen an average of .12 inches a year. Since 2000, however, that number has jumped to .2 inches annually. Another nearby island, Lohachara, was submerged in 1996, forcing its inhabitants to move to the mainland. At least one official in India’s foreign ministry told reporters that the disappearance of the island does not end the dispute between the South Asian neighbors, as maritime boundaries must still be resolved.

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I live on Yale across from the plasma center. There is normally a tall hedge in front of my house. And because of this hedge, nobody really knows there is a house behind it. And so I am normally situated in the calm eye of the freak storm of drunks and homeless and whoever else that parade around my house 24 hours a day starting fights, yelling "FUUUCK!" and "I'm gonna kill you!" snooping around the side of the house through the dumpster and looking into the windows. On March 25, the city shaved the 7-foot hedge down to a sad knee-high nub of skeletal branches, making me and roommate feel totally unsafe. Even when we had that hedge, the occasional weirdo still managed to wander into the yard off the street and hassle us for any number of reasons. So you can only imagine how things will go without that hedge. Hark! I hear one screaming outside the house right now as I type this. The city, apparently, decided this was necessary for the drivers turning from the alley into Yale lanes, but I haven't seen any sort of accident near the hedge since I moved in more than three years ago. And when my roommate confronted these sadists mid-project, they laughed at him and told him to take it up with the city. And what's more, for good measure they went ahead and shaved off the leaves from what remained of the hedge branches. I guess there's not much I can do, as it's me versus the city, but I just wanted to publicly announce that it's fucked up.

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Workers arrive for seed planting. They chant “Sí, se puede! Yes we can!” as they walk.

Photo Essay

The Harvest is Great

By Minie Gonzalez

Hundreds gathered at Sanchez Farm, 14 acres of open space operated by La Plazita Institute in the South Valley. They were there to work in honor of labor organizer and activist César Chávez. His daughter, Liz Chávez Villarino, flew in from California to attend the service event on Friday, March 26, and the march from the South Valley to the National Hispanic Cultural Center the following day.

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