Alibi V.19 No.20 • May 20-26, 2010 
Laura Claggett (Irina), Hannah Kauffmann (Masha) and Wendy Scott (Olga)

Culture Shock

The Long(-ish) Goodbye

In trying to write Culture Shock for this week, I’ve felt like J. Alfred Prufrock: “Then how should I begin ... and how should I presume.” In most respects, I think I’m a bit more realized and less fearful than T.S. Eliot’s cautionary creation, but these lines kept coming back to me as I started to write this, my final column as arts and literature editor.

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Laura Claggett (Irina), Hannah Kauffmann (Masha) and Wendy Scott (Olga)

Performance Review

Three Sisters

The Vortex takes on Chekhov

It seemed like a good idea, a happy confluence of events.

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Art News

Brother, Can You Spare a DimeStory?

Short stories long on ambition

Three minutes. No poems.

Those are the rules at DimeStories—a prose-only open mic trying to gain traction in Albuquerque’s poetry-dominated reading circuit.

The timing bodes well. In recent years, short-form writing like flash fiction, nano-fiction and drabbles (stories composed of exactly 100 words) has taken firm root in our text- and Tweet-obsessed, ADHD world. Flash anthologies abound. Big names like Joyce Carol Oates and Chuck Palahniuk have gotten into the act. NPR hosts a popular Three-Minute Fiction Contest. And the Alibi has its own annual clash of conciseness, the eight-year-old Flash Fiction Contest.

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Image courtesy of National Museum of Nuclear Science

EVENT HORIZON ()

General Ripper Exceeded His Authority

Design Zone Exhibit

The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History unveils a new exhibit on Saturday, Feb. 1 and continues through April 26. Titled Design Zone, the new topical display features a somewhat ironic investigation into the processes that drive creation, especially in regard to video games, roller-coasters and EDM music. This exhibit was designed at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry and it has a youthful, productive vibe to it. We get that. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists just announced that the hands on the doomsday clock were closer to midnight than ever. Even though nuclear power showed some promise in solving the world's energy needs, nuclear science still means the study of a type of war that would kill billions if put into action. Nuclear history equals the story of devising ever more efficient killing devices. It's wonderful to know citizens have a museum where they can learn all about that while also acquiring knowledge about the human creative urge. Admission to the museum, which is open daily from 9am to 5pm, ranges between $7 and $14. Go science!

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Image by Clarke Condé

EVENT HORIZON ()

Death? Then What?

Ana Pacheco: New Mexico Death Rituals

The author discusses the history of Christmas death rituals, roadside descansos, communal smallpox graves, Civil War memorials and more.
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Image via Pixabay

EVENT HORIZON ()

It's Not Just For Breakfast Anymore!

Dosed: Screening and Psilocybin Mushrooms and Iboga Panel Discussion

Learn how underground healers are using entheogens to treat depression, anxiety and opioid addiction with psilocybin and iboga and view the award-winning documentary.
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Image via Pixabay

EVENT HORIZON ()

Four Eyes

Niyaz: The Fourth Light Project

Who doesn't love a full sensory experience that challenges the mind? National Hispanic Cultural Center hosts an evening of immersive and groundbreaking multimedia that combines live music and dance performance with projection and body-mapping that responds to sound and movement in real time. Electroacoustic ensemble Niyaz presents The Fourth Light Project on Sunday, March 1 at 7:30pm. Onlookers also experience the words of legendary Sufi poets and ancient wisdom of Middle Eastern folk songs. Walk away from the philosophical adventure with a new outlook into the human depths. Tickets for this all-ages event range from $12 to $32.

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