The Super Bowl Revisited

Reliving the greatest Super Bowl I care to remember

I was right about one thing, the Super Bowl was damn close. The game went right down to the wire. Besides Super Bowl XXXIV, which was decided by a yard, this was the only Super Bowl in recent memory that had any real suspense.

I actually prefer this one to the Rams-Titans title game because it involved a team that was on the verge of making NFL history against a team that finished with only the fifth best record in a crappy conference.

The game begs to be analyzed using two of the most tired clichées in sports. If ever there were a game that pitted David against Goliath, this was it, and if there was ever a team with a legitimate claim to the always espoused belief that "nobody gave us a chance," it was the Giants.

From the beginning of the playoffs, when the Giants went up aginast Tampa Bay, they had plenty of doubters—myself included. Then when they faced the Packers, very few picked them to win. Finally, when the Super Bowl rolled around, the most anyone would grant them is that they'd make it close. Very few could have believed that the much-maligned Eli Manning would lead a no-huddle offense down the field for a game-winning touchdown with less than three minutes to play. And I don't think anyone thought the Giants defense could hold the most prolific offense in NFL history to seven first-half points.

My only hope is that the Giants' victory won't diminish what the Patriots have accomplished. As much as I despise them, going 18 and 1 is no small feat. It just goes to show how special Don Shula's 1972 Dolphins were. The Dolphins were crowned Super Bowl Champions after an undefeated season and are still the only team to do so in the history of the NFL.