Meow Wolf: Where Only The Absurd Exists

Go ahead, lose your mind

Monica Schmitt

My journey into an unreasonable world began gradually, transitioning from a seemingly normal, domestic home into increasingly peculiar surroundings. I walked inside of a house, or maybe warped through a space tunnel. I'm still not sure. It was dark, but unlike nighttime; time wasn't a factor. Instead, everything—including the impossible—simply existed. Creaky stairs led me to a small study, a bathroom and two bedrooms. I walked slowly, picking up on an eerie sensation from the desaturated and somber-looking family photos that hung on nearly every wall. Even the photos that contained smiling faces looked inherently sad. Something strange clearly happened here ...

Grant MacAllister

Inside the master bedroom was a computer with a talking head, spewing information about “the power of positive mechanics.” I didn't stay in this room very long. The closet beckoned with a blue glowing light and I entered, turned left and disappeared down a dark corridor into another dimension. Ambient sounds came from a room beyond where a man sat at a piano pressing keys that didn't exude melodic chords, rather, monstrous sounds and spooky vibrations. I got chills.

Grant MacAllister

Inside was indistinguishable from outside at first. Each place was equally inconceivable and they blurred together. Nothing was linear and everything was open to interpretation.

Downstairs, I opened a refrigerator, walked inside of it and through a brightly lit hallway that led to a tunnel. I ended up in a corridor with neon-colored coral wriggling up from the ground and giant fish floating four feet above my head.

Then: on the other side of thick, plastic streamers I stepped inside a dark, foggy room with red laser beams traveling vertically from a rocky formation to the ceiling. I reached out to touch them, plucking different notes with each different beam.

I peered over a railing and looked down into a glowing pink cavernous room with white, cave-like walls, stalactites and stalagmites. How did I get there? … Much later, I crawled through a fireplace and found myself in the pink cave room. Giant ribs floated above my head and I played them with a bone like a xylophone.

Up in the treetops, I crawled into a room with a tiny opening and took a seat on a pillow made of grass. Dragon eyes stared at me from the other side of the concave wall, with dark, silvery pupils and multicolored irises.

Because neither time nor space seemed to function normally, I don't know how long I stayed exploring or how far I wandered in what could have been circles. When I left, I had the urge to open any door, peer inside any window pane and explore anything unknown. I felt a profound curiosity and interest in everything I didn't understand. I was transfixed by a desire to explore, uncover and discover. Thanks to this timeless jumble of enigmatic spaces and objects and bizarre sensory illusions, the whole world became a playground.