PLEASE NOTE!
Due to the March 23, 2020 NM DOH Public Health Order, These Event Listings Are Not Accurate!
All non-essential businesses are closed, public gatherings are prohibited!
(One day some of these events will be rescheduled or will resume, but they are not happening now!)

We Are New Mexico & E UNIBUS PLURAM Opening Receptions

Friday Jan 9, 2015

1114 Seventh Street NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102-2051
US

Phone: 242-6367
Website: Click to Visit

Cost:

FREE

Ages:

ALL-AGES!

Contact:

Julia Mandeville

Phone: 505.242.6367
Website: Click to Visit

More events at Harwood Art Center

New works by photographer Wes Naman and the artist collective You're On TV. Runs through January.

 

The Harwood Art Center is thrilled to announce our January 2015 exhibitions featuring local talents, photographer Wes Naman and artist collective You’re On TV (Kyle Erickson, Matthew Thorson & Zane White). 

 We Are New Mexico: Portraits & Profiles by Wes Naman

Wes Naman and a team of renowned artists and writers visited 20 cities in 20 days to capture five-hundred portraits and the stories of those people who make our beloved state like no other place in the world. The exhibition previews the forthcoming We Are New Mexico book project.

 E UNIBUS PLURAM: A You’re On TV Production 

(Kyle Erickson, Matthew Thorson & Zane White)

Albuquerque-based artist collective You're On TV focuses on varying cultural attitudes in regards to environment, both natural and digital, that inform social beliefs and infrastructure. The artwork presents perspectives on mass media, wilderness, city life, and the cosmos and explores how they relate to social systems, both organic and contrived. 

See also: Culture Shock

Megametrically many

David Foster Wallace’s 1993 essay “E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction” tossed a lightning bolt into the stodgy world of cultural criticism, arguing in irrefutably logical cadences that TV’s special brand of false voyeurism has surpassed the ability of modern literature to critique it. “We are the Audience,” he writes, “megametrically many, though most often we watch alone: E Unibus Pluram.”

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