PLEASE NOTE!
Due to the March 23, 2020 NM DOH Public Health Order, These Event Listings Are Not Accurate!
All non-essential businesses are closed, public gatherings are prohibited!
(One day some of these events will be rescheduled or will resume, but they are not happening now!)

Nobel Prize Through the Prism of Russian Writers

Sunday Jan 8, 2017

2000 Mountain Rd NW
Albuquerque, NM 87104-1459
US

Phone: 243-7255
Website: Click to Visit

Cost:

$15-$20

Ages:

13+

Contact:

Albuquerque International Association

Phone: 505-856-7277
Website: Click to Visit

Dr. Natasha Kolchevska examines the intriguing story behind the Nobel Prize in Literature by looking at the Russian and Soviet awardees over the last 70 years.

The Albuquerque International Association will host a lecture by Dr. Natasha Kolchevska, Professor Emerita of UNM. She will examine the intriguing story behind the Nobel Prize in Literature by looking at the Russian/Soviet awardees over the last 70 years.

What does it take to win the Nobel prize in literature —does it matter if you write fiction, poetry or non-fiction–or some combination of the above? Do you take daring political risk or does it suffice to be an exceptional writer? Is it better to have the support of the establishment or express your principled opposition to it? To have a body of formally innovative work or write in a more traditional vein? To have a career of justified fame or unjustified obscurity? When the first Nobel Prize was awarded in 1901, the Swedish Academy originally favored conservatives such as Rudyard Kipling, while snubbing Leo Tolstoy and Emile Zola. During World War I, several prizes went to Scandinavians as the academy sought to avoid the appearance of taking sides with fighting countries. In the 1930s, the initial criterion of “ideal direction” was reinterpreted as “universal interest,” with popular authors such as Pearl Buck and Sinclair Lewis among the beneficiaries. In recent years, the Academy has become increasingly open to non-traditional genres–e.g. the largely journalistic work of Svetlana Aleksievich in 2015 and of course, the bard and pop culture hero Bob Dylan in 2016–but there is a long history of extra-literary considerations in the selection of awardees. We will examine the story behind the Nobel Prize in Literature by looking at the Russian/Soviet awardees over the last 70 years.

Lecture Cost: $15/AIA Members, $20/Non-Members; Students (under 30) with ID – Free. Please address checks to AIA and mail to AIA, PO Box 92995, Albuquerque, NM 87199 by January 5. You can also pay on-line with credit card at www.abqinternational.org or at the door (cash and check only).