PLEASE NOTE!
Due to the March 23, 2020 NM DOH Public Health Order, These Event Listings Are Not Accurate!
All non-essential businesses are closed, public gatherings are prohibited!
(One day some of these events will be rescheduled or will resume, but they are not happening now!)

Lawyers Without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany Opening Reception and Talk

Tuesday Feb 7, 2017

1117 Stanford Dr NE
Albuquerque, NM 87131
US

Cost:

FREE

Ages:

18+

Contact:

Tamara Williams

Phone: 505-277-9504
Website: Click to Visit

More events at UNM School of Law

A vivid picture of the life of Jewish lawyers in the Dusseldorf area with their differing commitments to the political, religious and social movements of the time. Talk by Professor Sherri Burr.

The Holocaust & Intolerance Museum of New Mexico and UNM School of Law are hosting the highly acclaimed international traveling exhibition, Lawyers Without Rights:  Jewish Lawyers in Germany under the Third Reich, on display from February 6 - March 11, 2017 in the Forum @ the Law School, 1117 Stanford N.E.  Opening Reception, sponsored by Aleli & Brian Colon, Tuesday, February 7 from 5 - 6:30 P.M.  Talk by Regents Professor Sherri Burr @ 5:30:  Defining Others to Justify Abolishing Legal and Human Rights: Parallels between Jews in Nazi Germany and Free Blacks in Colonial Virginia. (Program approved for 1.0 general hour of credit.)  Free parking after 4 P.M. RSVPs required:  (505) 277-2146 or online: goto.unm.edu/withoutrights  

The American Bar Association and the German Federal Bar are responsible for bringing this compelling exhibition to North America. The ABA says that the exhibition's message "resonates with all persons who understand and appreciate a just rule of law, and it is a commentary and a lesson for all people everywhere about the dangers when lawyers or minorities are attacked or the law itself is unjustly applied." The exhibition gives a vivid picture of the life of Jewish lawyers in the Dusseldorf area with their differing commitments to the political, religious, and social movements of the time. Ultimately, it restores the names, faces, and individual fates to the area's history so that these persons can be remembered.