The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility

Saturday Feb 17, 2018

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516 Central Ave SW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
US

Phone: 242-1445
Website: Click to Visit

Cost:

FREE

Ages:

ALL-AGES!

Contact:

Mackensie

Phone: 505-242-1445
Website: Click to Visit

More events at 516 ARTS

Contemporary artists explore the border as a physical reality, subject and as a site for production and solution. Runs through 4/14.

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516 ARTS and the Albuquerque Museum present The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility co-curated by Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims and Ana Elena Mallet. The exhibition presents the work of contemporary artists who explore the border as a physical reality (place), as a subject (imagination), and as a site for production and solution (possibility). The inclusion of artists from various disciplines —including design, architecture, sculpture, painting, and photography—reflects the ways in which contemporary artists and designers themselves cross disciplinary borders. Many of the artists featured in the exhibition pursue a creative problem-solving process sometimes described as “design thinking,” which involves invention, social engagement, and the task of making.

The original exhibition is developed by and travels to Albuquerque from Los Angeles’ Craft and Folk Art Museum where it was on view for Pacific Standard Time Los Angeles/Latin America (PST LA/LA) 2017. The main exhibition in Albuquerque is hosted by 516 ARTS, and has been expanded into a collaboration with an additional exhibition site at the Albuquerque Museum and accompanying interdisciplinary public programs around Albuquerque.

The border has come to occupy an intellectual and an emotionally charged space as well as a territorial one. It exists within the geography of memory as much as being a place of transit and transformation. Much of the creative production around the border unearths ways in which artists, architects, designers and makers who live in border states negotiate two divided but interconnected realities. Although this exhibition was conceived before the topic of “building a wall” along the US-Mexico border re-emerged in media headlines, its relevance is more potent and instructive than ever before.