"Alive and...Well..." at CFA Downtown, Albuquerque
PLEASE NOTE!
Due to the March 23, 2020 NM DOH Public Health Order, These Event Listings Are Not Accurate!
All non-essential businesses are closed, public gatherings are prohibited!
(One day some of these events will be rescheduled or will resume, but they are not happening now!)

"Alive and...Well..."

Friday March 22, 2019

113 Fourth Street NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
US

Cost:

FREE

Ages:

ALL-AGES!

Contact:

Cat Hulshoff

Website: Click to Visit

More events at CFA Downtown

A symposium designed to start dialogue for the logistics of ethical behaviors involved in being a better scholar, creator and archivist of shared knowledge without ego-driven desire to get credit first and be credible later.

Hello everyone! I would like to extend an invitation to a workshop style symposium, "Alive and...Well..." hosted by the CFA Downtown Studio, on March 22nd, 2019.  

This event is public (not just for artists, this conversations is for anyone doing any kind of graduate research), so please share with anyone and everyone. Seating if free but limited so please RSVP! Light refreshments will be served and there will be a break for lunch. RSVP to "Alive and...Well..." on eventbrite link as follows:

 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/alive-andwell-tickets-55782478896

This symposium started out as a need to answer my own questions and it quickly became clear that I was not alone. Over the course of my career as a grad student, I have rarely ever known what questions to ask, or who to ask when it came to conducting independent research that moves beyond the online search bar or bookshelf. Whether it was for an academic paper, a conference presentation, or in researching for my own creative process and then writing about it afterwards (or even worse having it written about by someone else! Yikes...), the fact was that most of the time I just didn't know- what I didn't know, and in trying to remain an ethical writer and democratic possessor of my new found knowledge, I was really learning more on accident. For example, practicing group work in school never actually taught me how to responsibly seek out and be an interdisciplinary player- even though that's what I was told I was doing. Group work always just feel like a fight to get credit for your own work as an individual (because I'll be damned if I was going to let Slacker Pat get credit for my work). I didn't actually learn how to collaborate successfully until my third year as a PhD student. This feels a little late. 

These happy accidents, like: learning how to make your voice heard in an interview, how to interview a living artist ethically, how to use local and living knowledge in your research- even if it works against your own way of knowing (this is also known as listening), and how to respond to just plain bad scholarship, were all thanks in to my faculty, peers, and community leaders in New Mexico, willing to use their own platforms to talk about some of the real-life issues not treated in a classroom setting. So why not start these conversations on purpose by hosting a symposium and invite some people? 

This symposium is designed to start a casual dialogue that addresses the logistics of being real-world participants in our fields together, but also to address the ethical behaviors involved in being a better scholar, creator, and archivist of shared knowledge today without the ego-driven desire to get credit first, but be credible later. The speakers that have been so willing to share their time with us draw experience from different backgrounds and give us as peers a rare opportunity to bring our own issues into the mix and start to develop actual interdisciplinary skills. We will hear from an art historian, curators, gallery directors, artists, and writers. After the speakers have time to share, we will then turn to each other, and start drawing these issues out of our own experiences. From this we may discover questions we weren't sure we were suppose to be asking, and what we have in common across disciplines.